Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

  • Title:  Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  • Director:  Alfonso Cuaron
  • Date:  2004
  • Studio:  Warner Brothers
  • Genre:  Fantasy, Children
  • Cast:  Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Julie Christie, Robbie Coltrane, Michael Gambon, Gary Oldman, Alan Rickman, Fiona Shaw, Maggie Smith, Emma Thompson, Dawn French, Robert Hardy, Julie Walters
  • Format:  Widescreen, Color
  • Format:  R1, NTSC

“Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of  times.” — Professor Dumbledore

Prisoner of Azkaban is my favorite Harry Potter book, and so far it still remains my favorite Harry Potter movie. The book opens up the Wizarding World even more by introducing the Wizard town of Hogsmeade just outside of  Hogwarts. The movie doesn’t spend as much time in Hogsmeade, I would have liked to see more, but it’s still an important part of the plot. The danger and sense of  evil is also much stronger in this film.

The director has changed, but the film is still beautifully shot, just gorgeous, especially the way quick-acting frost is used to visually signify the appearance of a Dementor.  This film also introduces a new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher, Professor Lupin (later revealed to be a werewolf), whom I really, really liked.  And we find out about Harry’s Godfather, Sirius Black, who’s accused of betraying Lily and James Potter to Voldemort and causing their deaths.

However (spoiler alert!), the core of the film is the discovery that Sirius wasn’t guilty of killing Peter Pettigrew, and it was Pettigrew who actually betrayed the Potters to Voldemort.  Still, Sirius has spent all that time in Azkaban, the Wizard prison, and only escapes at the beginning of this film.  Even at the end, he’s on the run for his life, because no one will believe Harry, Ron, and Hermione that he’s innocent.

Also, this film is the only one with time travel.  Hermione over-loads herself with a triple load of classes, and uses a time turner to attend classes held at the same time.  She and Harry are able to use the time turner to save Buckbeak, the Hippogriff, and Sirius.  Harry also conjures a Patronus for the first time, saving himself and Sirius from the Dementors.  (It’s cool – we see the scene from Harry I and Harry II’s perspective).

This film is also the last time the look and feel of the Harry Potter films is still innocent and young.  After this, the films get progressively darker (as do the novels they are based on).  Highly, highly recommended for children eight and up.  Later films are better for the over-thirteen crowd.

Recommendation:  See it!
Rating:  5 of 5 Stars
Next Film:  Harry Potter and the Goblet of  Fire

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