The Maltese Falcon (1941)

  • Title:  The Maltese Falcon (1941)
  • Director:  John Huston
  • Date:  1941
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Pictures
  • Genre:  Drama, Mystery, Film Noir
  • Cast:  Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor, Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet, Elisha Cook Jr.
  • Format:  Black and White, Standard
  • DVD Format:  R1, NTSC

“That’s good coming from you. What have you ever given me besides money? Ever given me any of your confidence, any of the truth? Haven’t you tried to buy my loyalty with money and nothing else?” — Sam Spade

“Our private conversations have not been such that I am anxious to continue them. Forgive my speaking blunting but it is the truth.”  — Joel Cairo

“I’ll tell you right out, I’m a man who likes talking to a man who likes to talk.”  — Kasper “The Fat Man” Gutman

The Maltese Falcon, based on Dashiell Hammett’s novel almost defines the genre of Film Noir, though for Noir films, I prefer Billy Wilder’s Double Indemnity. The Maltese Falcon is a tad long, and rather confusing, even after several viewings (and I have seen this film several times over the years). However, it still does have many Noir hallmarks:  the snappy, fast dialogue, the designing woman (or femme fatale), and introduces the Noir staple of the tough-as-nails, but honest, private detective.

Bogart, and the rest of the cast, which includes Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre, as well as Elisha Cook, Jr. and Mary Astor are all good, and excellently cast in their roles. And this film is from the heyday of Warner Brothers, when the studio turned out dozens if not hundreds of Noir films (including their gangster films) a year. This is also a breakout film for Bogart, moving him from day player at Warner’s (oddly enough often playing “heavies” simliar to Cook’s role in this film) to leading roles.

The plot, involving the chase for the the Falcon (often called “The Black Bird”, and once, by Spade, “The dingus”), is more of a McGuffin — the real plot, and the driving force of the film is the murder of Spade’s partner, Archer, at the beginning of the film. This murder is nearly forgotten until the end, when the audience discovers that Sam hasn’t forgotten, at all, what happened to Archer. And, despite the fact that Sam may have had an affair with Archer’s wife (or she at least has a crush on him, she pretty much throws herself at Spade, while still in Widow’s Weeds), he still considers it his duty to do something about the murder of his partner, no matter what. Sam is an honorable man and will keep his honor, whatever the cost. Thus it is the conclusion of the film that is excellent and memorable.

The look of the film is great, and it’s set in atmospheric San Francisco, which helps, though I doubt it was filmed there.

Overall, The Maltese Falcon is one of those classic films one just really needs to see, and appreciate and occasionally re-watch. For such a dark film, enjoyable isn’t really the correct word, but it is a very good film, and an important contribution to Film Noir.

Recommendation:  See it!
Rating:  4 of  5 Stars
Next Film:  The Maltese Falcon (1931)

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