Batman Mystery of the Batwoman

  • Title:  Batman Mystery of the Batwoman
  • Director: Curt Geda
  • Voice Director: Andrea Romano
  • Date: 2003
  • Studio: Warner Brothers
  • Genre: Action, Animation, Mystery
  • Cast: Kevin Conroy, Efrem Zimbalist Jr, David Ogden Stiers, Kimberly Brooks, Kelly Ripa, Elisa Gabrielli, Bob Hastings, Tara Strong, Robert Costanzo
  • Format: Color Animation, Standard
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

“The last thing Gotham City needs is a vigilante running amok.”— Bruce Wayne
“As they say on the streets – ‘I ain’t touching that one.’ “— Alfred

A mysterious new vigilante appears in Gotham — the Batwoman, but is she a force for good, or a criminal? That, and just who is the Batwoman, is a mystery Batman must solve. Bruce meets Kathy Duquesne, the daughter of famous gangster, Carlton Duquesne, and begins dating her, in part because he wonders if she might have something to do with the sudden appearance of the Batwoman, a masked vigilante. He also meets a brilliant, and pretty, and blonde female metallurgist, nicknamed Rocky, who is newly employed at Wayne Enterprises. When Batman finds her new programmable metal at the scene of Batwoman’s attack on the Penguin’s club, he wonders if she might be involved. And he also runs into Harvey Bullock’s new partner, Sonia, but doesn’t initially realize the importance of the meeting.

Meanwhile, Carlton Duquesne, Penguin, and Rupert Thorne (another gangster) are plotting how to deliver a cargo of weapons to whatever-stan (a made-up name that’s not really that important). Batwoman had destroyed their first shipment, being transported by truck, so they plot for the next shipment to leave Gotham on a ship — a ship disguised to look like a cruise ship. For insurance, Penguin calls in Bane (the muscle-bound, steroid-addicted, South American mercenary, famous for once literally breaking the back of the Bat).

Batman, with help from Robin, and the ever present support of Alfred, investigates the mystery, trying to determine who the Batwoman is. He comes to the conclusion it might be Rocky and Kathy working together, but Robin finds no evidence that the two ever met. But, Batman then discovers a link: Sonia — who knew them both. Batman, or Bruce, as the case may be, has also discovered what the three have in common: a reason to be angry at the unholy triumvirate of Penguin, Thorne, and Duquesne. Sonia, as a child, saw her parents business destroyed by Thorne — a disaster from which the family never recovered and tore them apart (though it was Batman who saved her life in the fire). Rocky’s boyfriend was framed by Thorne and Penguin and sits in jail. And Kathy lost her mother when a rival gang shot at her father and killed her mother instead.

But Bruce also cannot condone someone else being a vigilante in his town, especially when innocent people get hurt, or even criminals get killed. He sets out to stop them. Meanwhile, Kathy’s taken a bomb to the ship that carries Penguin and Thorne’s guns — but she gets caught by Bane. She’s unmasked, but Batman arrives to save her, followed by Robin in the Batboat and the other two Batwomen on their glider-rockets. The bomb explodes, sinking the ship, but all three Batwomen are rescued and Throne, Penguin and Duquesne are caught.

I enjoyed this Batman animated movie. This was the second time I’d seen it, so I knew who the Batwoman was, yet the care the storyline takes in drawing character studies of these three women, who have all be affected by crime and violence, makes the story very re-watchable. Also, the cast is excellent, bringing back many of the regulars from Batman: The Animated Series — Robert Conzanso as Bullock, Bob Hastings as Gordon, Tara Strong as Barbara, and, of course Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. as Alfred. Yes, a Robin is in this, but since Barbara is away at college, I suspect Dick is too (and possibly not yet Nightwing) and the Robin is Tim Drake, tho’ he’s never actually called by name.

Recommendation: See it
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Faster Shooting Speeds for Film?

You see it on television all the time. Sports shows are 60 frames. Those flawless slo-mo playbacks with no smearing. I haven’t seen ‘The Hobbit’ yet, but I do believe it would be nice to get away from 24 frames per second — even just to 30 frames per second. I don’t have a nostalgic longing to stick with the smearing or strobing you get when you pan with a film camera. It’s not nice. It comes from ancient technology that we don’t need anymore. Even upping to 30 might get rid of that, I don’t know why 48 as opposed to 50 or 60, frankly. In a weird way, 48, as double of 24, is still clinging to the old technology.

David Cronenberg

The legendary director shares his thoughts of the 24 fps vs.48 fps debate (via Indiewire)

Someone explain this?

(via nerdayia)

@nerdavia — FPS stands for Frames per Second.  It refers to the speed that 35mm (or higher) film stock is feed through the camera to record the image.  (The moving image of film is an illusion – actually it’s a series of still images).  Traditionally, modern films with sound are shot at 24 FPS.  Jackson doubled that to 48 FPS, and it probably has to do with the sheer number of digital effects in the film.

Recycled Paper Building Materials

earth911:

Leave it to German engineering…

Check out the GreenFiber company that makes home insulation out of recycled paper that virtually cannot catch on fire! It blew our minds!

earthandscience:

It’s not too uncommon to see paper recycled into things like jewelry, wallpaper or even furniture. But it’s a bit surprising to see a seemingly flimsy material being used exclusively in a building that actually withstood hard rain and high winds, like this 2,045 square foot temporary workspace in Essen, Germany that’s made with 550 bales of recycled paper. (via Experimental Recycled Paper Bale Structure Serves Up Some Surprises)

Hum, I’d like to test it where I live — where it rains all the time, except in the Winter when it snows.

David Cronenberg on Using Faster fps

You see it on television all the time. Sports shows are 60 frames. Those flawless slo-mo playbacks with no smearing. I haven’t seen ‘The Hobbit’ yet, but I do believe it would be nice to get away from 24 frames per second — even just to 30 frames per second. I don’t have a nostalgic longing to stick with the smearing or strobing you get when you pan with a film camera. It’s not nice. It comes from ancient technology that we don’t need anymore. Even upping to 30 might get rid of that, I don’t know why 48 as opposed to 50 or 60, frankly. In a weird way, 48, as double of 24, is still clinging to the old technology.

David Cronenberg

The legendary director shares his thoughts of the 24 fps vs.48 fps debate (via Indiewire)

Bloody good POINT, David!  After all, silent films were at a different FPS rate than “talkies”; and film speed is certainly determined by physical determinations.  Whereas I do see advantages of shooting on film stock over pure digital film-making (clearer masters, larger depth of field, etc) I didn’t notice any difference the first time I saw “The Hobbit” (in a large THX theater).  I did notice that when I saw it the second time in a smaller theater it seemed to make my eyes tired, but it was also about 20 degrees too warm in the place, and I was coming down with a cold — so either of those might explain the tiredness more so than the clarity of the screen image.