HBO Inks Exclusive, 10-Year Deal With Universal To Keep Content Out Of Netflix’s Hands

futureoffilm:

Good or bad idea?

BAD IDEA!!!!  Universal is already one of the worst providers of DVD content.  This demonstrates a determination to stick with an out-dated business model.  Entertainment companies can no longer horde their content and expect to somehow create a “lost treasure” pile that gains interest (as in savings account interest).  When consumers literally have thousands of options all vying for their their most precious commodity – their time, by not publishing content, all Universal and HBO are doing is creating a situation where no one will be interested in their content.  I can’t think of a quicker way to go bankrupt.

If HBO thinks that by doing this they can get more consumers to subscribe to their “exclusive” content — they are living in the 1980s.  Or maybe even the 1960s.  That might have worked when the US only had three television networks, but in a world where cable/satellite television alone provides hundreds of channels full of original programming this is truly an out-of-date pipe-dream.  Add in the Internet, DVD and Blu-Ray, games of all types, comics, movies, live events such as sports, and even good old-fashioned books, and the consumer doesn’t so much have to search for entertainment as he or she must find a way of whittling it down to the content most interesting and appropriate to their own interests and life.

HBO Inks Exclusive, 10-Year Deal With Universal To Keep Content Out Of Netflix’s Hands

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Big Data

Big data is not just about the enterprise. The fact is that every company, from consumer giants like Facebook and Twitter to the fast-growing enterprise companies like Cloudera, Box, Okta and Good Data are all big data companies by definition of the word. Every technology company with a set of engaged regular users is collecting large amounts of data, a.k.a. “big data.” In a world where data is the key to most product innovation, being a “big data” startup isn’t that unique, and honestly doesn’t say much about the company at all.

According to IBM, big data spans four dimensions: Volume, Velocity, Variety, and Veracity. Nowadays, in the worlds of social networking, e-commerce, and even enterprise data storage, these factors apply across so many sectors. Large data sets are the norm. Big data doesn’t really mean much when there are so many different ways that we are sifting through and using these massive amounts of data.

Batman Year One

  • Title: Batman: Year One
  • Directors: Sam Liu, Lauren Montgomery
  • Date: 2011
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: Action, Drama, Animation, Film Noir
  • Cast: Bryan Cranston, Ben McKenzie, Eliza Dushku, Katee Sackhoff
  • Format: Color, Widescreen Animation
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

The animation in this film is very impressive — it’s difficult to get a gritty, dark look to animation, yet Batman: Year One manages to do so. This film impressively keeps the look of Frank Miller’s Batman: Year One from the Batman comic book published by DC Comics. This is also Jim Gordon’s story, and cast in the role of Lt. James Gordon is Bryan Cranston, who does a good job.  The film is also real film noir stuff. Film Noir doesn’t have heroes, it has protagonists. The difference being a hero is frequently perfect (or can be thought of as perfect or trying to obtain perfection. Superman is a hero — invulnerable to anything bar Kryptonite, immortal, and always, always doing the perfect thing without errors or mistakes). A protagonist is much more realistic — Batman, in whatever guise you find him, has always been a protagonist.

Batman: Year One, though, makes Jim Gordon the protagonist. He’s an honest cop, which is dangerous in a town with a dishonest and corrupt police force. He’s just moved to Gotham City, after turning in a dirty cop to Internal Affairs in another city, and not being thanked for his efforts. But Gordon is no perfect angel. He has an affair while his wife is pregnant. He watches and waits as he’s introduced to the corruption in the Gotham PD, but he isn’t anxious to make the same mistakes he did before. And he’s tough.

Batman: Year One, is also the story of Gotham City. A nightmare town, full of danger, violence, graft, corruption, and sex. Catwoman starts off as a hooker. She’s also trying to protect a young girl who’s starting in the trade as well when Bruce meets her for the first time. Gotham is rough, scary and dark — and it needs the Dark Knight as a protector. This is a city that understands when Batman says, “I am the dark, I am the night, I am Batman.”

Unfortunately, Batman doesn’t get to utter that line, or any other seminal Batman lines of Bruce claiming his identity as his own. Part of the problem is the actor they got for Batman/Bruce (Ben McKenzie) just doesn’t do a very good job. I can’t believe this guy as Batman, he just doesn’t work. Why, oh why, couldn’t they have asked Kevin Conroy back? Or at least Bruce Greenwood? This Batman is too weak and doesn’t work as Bruce either. A good Batman must also always be able to carry the part of Bruce Wayne, something Christain Bale and Kevin Conroy could do. In this version, Bruce is either WAY over-the-top, or so morose he sounds semi-suicidal. Neither is right for Bruce Wayne, not even a young Bruce Wayne.

Alfred is also practically non-existent in this film. One of the advantages of early Batman stories, is they tend to use Alfred more. And the Alfred and Bruce relationship has always been one of my favorites in the Batman mythos. (The other is Batman and Nightwing. And there’s a similarity between those two relationships. Alfred is very much a father to Bruce — he raised him and is the only person in the entire DC universe to have any idea what Bruce was like before that fatal night. Bruce, in turn, raised Dick Greyson, and he’s very much a father to the younger man.) There was a missed opportunity, by showing Alfred hardly at all.

But if Alfred is practically non-existent in Batman: Year One, it’s ironic, given the title of the film, that Batman really doesn’t get much screen time. This is Gordon’s story, it’s Gotham’s story, but it sure isn’t Batman’s story — and therefore it misses the boat. I was disappointed, for I did have high hopes. So, yes, the film is good, and the animation is incredible, but it’s not great (as it should be), and that’s to be laid at the feet of a major casting misstep.

Recommendation: See it at least, it’s worth it for the noir story.
Rating: 3 out of 5 Stars

Batman Beyond Return of the Joker

  • Title: Batman Beyond Return of the Joker
  • Director: Curt Geda
  • Voice Director: Andrea Romano
  • Date: 2000
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: Action, Fantasy, Mystery
  • Cast: Kevin Conroy, Will Friedle, Mark Hamill, Dean Stockwell, Teri Garr, Tara Strong, Frank Welker, Michael Rosenbum
  • Format: Color Animation, Widescreen
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

This film bridges the gap between Batman: The Animated Series and Batman Beyond, answering some of the unanswered questions. And it brings back the most famous Batman villian — the Joker. Briefly, Batman Beyond, part of the DC Animated Universe, was a television series set 50 years after Batman: The Animated Series. Bruce has gotten old and is now unable to fight crime. Terry McGinnis becomes the new Batman, having at first stolen Bruce’s latest Batsuit (used before his retirement) and then with Bruce’s blessing. Terry is a bit more light-hearted than Bruce but not as light-hearted as some of the Robins. He has a mother and a younger brother (tho’ his father was murdered) and even a girlfriend. The solid black suit with a red bat symbol is more technically advanced, with jet packs that allow real flight (so the cape is gone). It also has a video and audio link to the Cave where Bruce advises Terry. Throughout the series The Joker’s been missing but a gang of trouble-makers called Jokerz have caused Terry and the city of New Gotham trouble. It’s a cyber-punked/21st century Batman rather than the Art Deco/30s/Film Noir look of Batman: The Animated Series.

This film opens with Batman breaking up a theft of electronic equipment by the Jokerz. All goes well, but when he discusses it later with Bruce, Terry’s confused, because high-end electronics and computers aren’t normally the Jokerz’ style — they usually go for quick cash. Bruce dismissed the theft as “looking for stuff they could fence”. Bruce, perhaps, has too much on his mind — he’s returning to be the active head of Wayne Enterprises.

The Joker (again, voiced by Mark Hamill, as he was in B:TAS) breaks up the party welcoming back Bruce. Terry changes into the Batsuit and rescues Bruce and the party-goers but the Joker gets away. At the Cave, he insists Bruce fill him in on the background of the Joker. Bruce merely insists that Joker is dead, saying he was there when it happened. Terry jumps to the conclusion Bruce killed Joker, he had no choice, then stopped being Batman. Bruce refuses to comment. He also forbids Terry to go after Joker and even asks for the suit back.

Terry goes to see Barbara Gordon. Barbara refuses to talk, only mentioning Tim Drake (Robin # 3).  Terry sees Tim, but gets no answers from him either.

Deciding he will quit, Terry is relieved to spend time with his family and Dana, his girlfriend. But the Jokerz show up at the club Terry and Dana frequent and try to kidnap the girl. They also try to kill Terry. After speaking with the police, and checking on Dana, Terry goes to see Bruce. But he’s too late — Ace, Bruce’s protective Great Dane is injured, and Bruce is unconscious with a hideous smile on his face. The Cave is a wreck, the costume displays destroyed, and “Ha Ha” written in red everywhere. Bruce, between laughs, manages to point Terry to the anti-toxin for the Joker’s laughing gas, and Terry gives him a shot, then calls Barbara.

Barbara Gordon, who was once Batgirl and is now Police Commissioner Gordon, decides to explain what happened in the past. In a well-executed flashback, we learn what happened:  Harley Quinn had set-up young Robin, Tim Drake, and he is kidnapped by the Joker. Batman and Batgirl search for him for three weeks. Finally, Joker leaves them a blatant clue — Batman and Batgirl follow, and discover the horrifying truth:  Tim/Robin was tortured, electrocuted, drugged, beaten, and finally programmed to be Joker Jr. They find him complete with the white face, green hair, and a miniature purple suit. But merely turning Robin into a copy of himself isn’t enough for Joker — he also orders the boy to shoot and kill Batman. (Batgirl is meanwhile somewhere else in the now abandoned Arkham Asylum fighting Harley Quinn). But Tim shoots, and kills, Joker instead. Barbara rushes to Tim, as does Batman.

In the present, Barbara explains they buried Joker then took Tim to Dr. Leslie Thompkins, who took a year to put him back together again. After that, Batman forbade him to ever put on the Robin suit. It was the disastrous final clash with Joker that caused Bruce to forbid Terry from going after the super villain.

Terry, meanwhile, is trying to find out what’s going on. Evidence leads to Tim, yet Tim claims to be innocent. However, in front of Terry (in the Batsuit) and Bruce’s (at home in the cave, barely recovered) eyes Tim turns into Joker — victim of a transmitter containing Joker DNA that takes over his subconscience and brain. It’s basically like a scientific explanation of the “split personality” villain. Tim isn’t even aware that the Joker is piggy-backing in his body, thinking any memories are only bad dreams. Joker plans to take over a government laser defense satellite, using telecom equipment stolen by the Jokerz and Tim’s know-how to put it together. He’s already blown-up a boat, and now plans to strike close to home for Terry:  blowing up the hospital where Dana’s recovering, blowing up Terry’s home where his Mom and brother are, and blowing up Wayne Manor and Bruce — just to get started. However, Terry has discovered the secret to defeating the Joker, which is does, then he destroys the control chip in Tim’s head, bringing the man back to normal.

An excellent movie, yes, it is like a longer version of a Batman Beyond episode, but it was also quite dark — especially the torture of Tim Drake, and Bruce and Barbara covering up a murder. There’s also some extremely effective visuals. The film is enjoyable tho’, with the saucy dialog common to Batman Beyond, and it answered some questions — where was the Joker? What happened to Tim Drake? What caused Bruce to give up the Batsuit? (something touched on in the series premiere as well). But it also didn’t answer everything — Nightwing / Dick Grayson is mentioned, a couple of times, but it’s never explained what happened to him.

Recommendation: See it! Buy it!
Rating: 4 of 5 stars