Book Review – Doctor Who: Lords of the Storm

  • Title: Lords of the Storm
  • Series: Virgin Publishing Missing Doctor Adventures
  • Author: David A. McIntee
  • Characters:  Fifth Doctor, Turlough
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 10/12/2015

The Lords of the Storm is a original novel in the Doctor Who the Missing Adventures series, featuring the unusual combination of the Fifth Doctor as played by Peter Davison on the BBC television series, and his companion, Turlough. I enjoyed seeing Turlough and just Turlough as the Doctor’s companion in this book – it’s an unusual combination (one I’ve only seen in one Big Finish audio adventure and no other novels), it also means there’s less of the “the companions and the Doctor get separated and spend half the story looking for each other” running around. Not that I don’t enjoy that too!

This story is set on a pair of Indian colony moons (Indian as in the country of India) that circle a gas giant planet in the far future. Unfortunately for the inhabitants of the moons, their star system is about to be caught in the crossfire of the long-running Sontaran/Rutan War.

The Doctor and Turlough arrive, almost by mistake, and quickly become involved in events – but coming at them sideways, not head on, which made for an interesting story.

This book also gives a lot of information about the Sontarans and the Rutan, with whole chapters written from Sontaran or Rutan point of view. I enjoyed learning more about the Rutan, their collective mind, and their interesting method of reproduction (they spontaneously divide into exact copies), and their space ships were fascinating. The Sontarans, being a clone race, had considerably less individuality than the humans and were in a sense less interesting. I did find it interesting though that lower-level Sontaran combat troops, basically the cannon fodder, had their brains literally bred out of them. They were bred to follow orders blindly, without question, and even without regard for their own lives. The officers were slightly more intelligent, but not much. And the Sontarans totally felt that their society was better than that of humans with their individuality. The Rutan, as literally a single group organism that was split into many parts didn’t even seem to understand human individuality.

All of this is set against a pair of terraformed moons (well one terraformed and the other partially terraformed) settled by India and still using the Caste system. I actually learned something about India and Indian culture reading this book, which was interesting to note. And I really liked the main guest character, Nur, a pilot who’s father was randomly appointed the governor of the terraformed moon, which means he’s in charge and since Nur is female, she’s expected to be a good-will ambassador (touring hospitals, etc.). Nur who is fiercely independent despite her background, despises the fluffy work she has to do – and points out she’s not good at it. However, the hospital tour she takes at the beginning of the story does provide information that’s important later.

The Sontarans basically have a plot to trap the Rutan Host, but it’s not a very good one – and besides causing a lot of death, it’s success would destroy the gas giant, not to mention the moons orbiting it. The Doctor, Turlough, Nur, and Shama Nur’s fiance (arranged) have to figure out and then stop the Sontarans’ plan.

Although the book was slow in places, I liked the setting, I liked the featured guest characters, it was fun to learn more about the Rutan (a frequently mentioned but seldom seen Doctor Who monster), and I enjoyed learning a bit about the culture of India. The glossary in the back of the book was very useful. But I did find it harder to get through the chapters about the Sontarans.

Chronologically, this Missing Adventure novel precedes the New Adventure Shakedown.

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