Book Review – Birds of Prey vol. 1: Trouble in Mind (New 52)

  • Title: Birds of Prey vol. 1: Trouble in Mind
  • Author:  Duane Swierczynski
  • Artists: Jesus Saiz, Nei Ruffino, Allen Passalaqua, June Chung, Carlos M. Mangual
  • Line: New 52
  • Characters: Batgirl (Barbara Gordon), Black Canary (Dinah Lance), Starling, Katana, Poison Ivy
  • Collection Date: 2012
  • Collected issues: Birds of Prey #1-7 (2011-2012)
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 5/30/2016

I’m not normally a fan of DC’s “New 52” Era of Comics, which is why I’m very excited about Rebirth but I’ve heard good things about the new Birds of Prey so I thought I’d give it a try. And much to my surprise I did enjoy this book, enough that I plan on buying volume 2.

This story features Black Canary as the nominal leader of the Birds of Prey, Barbara Gordon having bowed out to become Batgirl again. Black Canary is joined by Starling, an expert with guns, Katana, an expert with a katana sword as well as a martial artist, and Poison Ivy. The group each has their own troubles, Black Canary for example is wanted for murder – which she probably did not commit, though we aren’t given any information about why she’s wanted for murder or even who she supposedly killed. The group investigates what turns out to be a mind-control operation. The men in stealth-suits they are fighting are ordinary people who are being controlled by a drug that is supposed to be used to treat stroke, and nursery rhyme control phrases. When an operative is compromised, the control phrase can be used to literally make the person’s head blow-up. The Birds of Prey fall into the mess and try to figure it out. However, by the end of the book it’s clear that one or more, and possibly all of the Birds have also been influenced by “Choke” as they are calling the person in charge of the nefarious plan.

This version of Birds of Prey includes both villains (Poison Ivy) and chaotic good (Katana, Starling) characters as well as heroes (Black Canary, a very brief appearance by Batgirl) but the classic 1990s Birds of Prey featured around thirty female characters, some of which had been considered villains (Catwoman, Poison Ivy) or chaotic good (Huntress), so I don’t have a problem with the inclusion of “bad guy” or villain characters – the Birds of Prey had always been more open about membership than, for example, the Justice League (who seemed to have a Code of Conduct for members).

The story in Birds of Prey volume 1 Trouble in Mind was interesting, enough so that I will buy the next volume because I want to see what happens. However, I did feel the characterization was a little flat. Not as flat as other New 52 books I’ve read, which were awful. But when I compare this version of Birds of Prey to the Classic version, which I’ve also read, it comes up wanting a little – because the book is a slug fest for the most part, and character takes a back seat to the action. Now, I will say, again, I did enjoy Birds of Prey (New 52) but I just don’t find it as good as the original group led by Oracle.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s