Book Review – The World of Flashpoint Featuring Wonder Woman

  • Title: World of Flashpoint featuring Wonder Woman
  • Author: Dan Abnett
  • Artists: Tony Bedard, David Beaty, James Robinson, Andy Lanning, Ardian Syaf, Vicente Cifuentes, Eddie Nunez, Javi Fernandez, Scott Clark
  • Line: Stand Alone Graphic Novel
  • Characters: Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Lois Lane
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 7/03/2016

**Spoiler Alert** Whereas other volumes in the “World of Flashpoint” series have contained four separate stories, The World of Flashpoint featuring Wonder Woman consists of four much more closely related stories. The first two feature Wonder Woman and Aquaman, respectively, so we see the war that is tearing apart the world from both perspectives. The third story explains how Lois Lane, reporter, ends up in the UK working for the Resistance. The final story features an odd villainous character known as The Outsider.

In the Wonder Woman story, Princess Diana meets King Arthur of Atlantis – and the two plan a royal wedding as a way to merge their kingdoms for the betterment of the world. Diana even offers to let the marriage be one of convenience and appearances only – allowing Arthur to be with Mera his love. But unfortunately for them, and the world at large, Prince Orm, Arthur’s brother has Diana’s mother killed during the wedding. Orm and Penthesilea, Diana’s aunt, even frame Arthur’s ward, Garth for the crime. This starts the war between Atlantis and Thermyscira.

Every time one side or the other proposes peace or even seems to think of ending the war – either Orm or Penthesilea does something to blame the other side, to make the situation worse, and to continue the war – with hapless humanity in the crosshairs between the two titans of Atlantis and the Amazons. Aquaman sinks half of Europe when his wife, Mera, is killed during a peace conference in Vienna – unaware that it was Orm who killed her. In retaliation, at Penthesilea’s suggestion – the Amazons destroy Thermyscira, then invade the UK and raise it to new heights, towering above both the ocean and Europe at the cost of millions of lives.

Finally, Diana discovers that Penthesilea has been torturing and experimenting upon the humans she’s captured and put in concentration camps – in addition she’s also working with Orm to promote war. Diana is angered by what she discovers and goes to explain all to Arthur, exposing the manipulation for what it is. Arthur, to his credit, does actually believe her – until his entire fleet is blown up (by Orm – but he doesn’t know that). Aquaman becomes determined to make Wonder Woman pay for her final betrayal.

The Aquaman story also tells in flashbacks the story of Arthur’s early beginning – how his father met AtLanna, his mother, and how later he was stolen away to Atlantis to be the prince.

By showing the war from both Diana’s point of view and Arthur Curry’s point of view – the reader is able to really understand the conflict and see exactly what has brought Wonder Woman and Aquaman to their positions of destroying the world. That the two had wanted to join together to be a force for peace, for good, for enlightenment, and for making the world a better place – only to have that plan snatched away by “warriors” who only understand destruction and only want war – makes the story that much more tragic. Diana and Arthur could have brought about a “Golden Age” – instead Orm (whom DC comics readers know as “Ocean Master” one of Aquaman’s deadliest foes) and Penthesilea decide that war is “better” than peace, that as “warrior cultures” supporting peace and a better world is “the coward’s way”, etc. They practically accuse Diana and Arthur of “singing Kumbaya and growing flowers”. If this sounds familiar it should. The real villains here aren’t Aquaman and Wonder Woman for all the completely terrible things they do and the deaths they cause. The real villains are Orm and Penthesilea who manipulate two great cultures into a war – and cause the deaths of millions. Orm and Penthesilea call themselves cowards and also call Diana and Arthur weak “peacemongers” – but it is the two traitors who are weak. They are the ones who lack the vision of a better world.

“Lois Lane and the Resistance” starts with Lois on the phone with Perry White from Paris Fashion Week complaining about doing fluff pieces rather than real reporting. Well, be careful what you wish for, because Lois is right there when Paris and half of Europe are flooded. Lois sees Jimmy Olsen get killed and is transported to the former UK by the Amazons, but not before discovering that the “camera” Jimmy gave her before being swept away was actually made by Cyborg and was a link allowing Jimmy to report in as an agent. Lois agrees to work for Cyborg. Lois’s diary as a prisoner of the Amazons shows just how horrifying the conditions are. Yet it’s Lois who exposes Penthesilea to Wonder Woman who didn’t know what her Aunt is doing. Lois makes a desperate broadcast from the prison. She’s then rescued by the Resistance, led by Grifter (who looks a lot like Red Hood in costume, but remember Jason Todd is a priest in Gotham), and including Lady Godiva, Britannia, Canterbury Cricket and Hyde. Despite a betrayal by Hyde’s alter ego, Bobbie Stephenson a woman who’s gone over to the Amazons to be cured of Hyde, the Resistance and Lois are able to get Britannia her Mark 2.0 battle suit. Lois’s story ends with her broadcasting what’s going on, and the Resistance fighting the Furies (Wonder Woman’s most deadly troops).

“The Outsider” is the most unusual story in the collection. “The Outsider” is from India, yet his skin is greyish-white and looks like stone. He’s an unsavory businessman with his hands in every illegal business there is, and a manipulator of currencies, raw materials, jewels, metals, and just about everything else. He has no qualms about killing to get what he wants. He’s pretty much as evil as Lex Luthor, with none of the “charm”, and works on a global scale. The story also mentions Blackout, whom “The Outsider” want to use as a power source for India, Black Atom – now the ruler of Pakistan, and an awesome surprise – J’onn J’onzz – the Martian Manhunter, and The Outsider’s plaything who strikes back. It’s a surprising story, but though it’s told from The Outsider’s perspective he’s an utterly unempathetic character who one cannot identify with, even with his background explained.

The World of Flashpoint featuring Wonder Woman is the one Flashpoint novel you must read if you only read one of the extra novels – it gives the deepest background for Flashpoint and takes place directly before that story. Although the Flash isn’t in the novel at all, it sets the stage and explains what is going on and what this world is that Barry has woken up in. Highly, highly recommended.

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Book Review – Doctor Who: The Mystery of the Haunted Cottage

  • Title: The Mystery of the Haunted Cottage
  • Series: Doctor Who Novelette Collection
  • Author: Derek Landy
  • Characters: Tenth Doctor, Martha Jones
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 07/08/2016

Doctor Who – The Mystery of the Haunted Cottage is another short, little volume in the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary – 12 Doctors, 12 Books collection of mini-books. This one features the Tenth Doctor and his companion Martha Jones. The TARDIS lands in a bank of fog, but when Martha steps out of the TARDIS it immediately becomes a clear and sunny day with grass and trees and such. The Doctor and Martha meet four children – two boys and two girls, and Martha realizes she recognizes them as the Troublemakers – characters from a series of books that she read as a child. Quickly, she realizes that the situation is the same as the first Troublemakers book she ever read, “The Mystery of the Haunted Cottage”.

Martha and the Doctor work to figure out the clues and solve the mystery. When they take a boat down an underground river they are attacked by mysterious beings. They also quickly discover not only who is behind the mystery from the children’s book – but who the real threat is. This threat attacks the Doctor and Martha – causing them to run to escape through a maze of fictional characters and landscapes.

The Doctor confronts the being at the center of everything successfully and he and Martha, ultimately escape.

This story was a bit disappointing – it’s very simple, both in structure and in writing style. The Doctor makes some good points about “The Troublemakers” books and Martha makes some good counter-arguments (the books might not have been that good in an objective sense, but she loved them as a child and they set her on the path of a life-long reader). The descriptions of the Troublemakers books reminded me of Nancy Drew (syndicated series – written by ghost writers), and the characters also reminded me of Scooby Doo (but without a dog), because the Scooby kids included two guys: Fred and Shaggy – two girls: Velma and Daphne and they solved mysteries. Overall, though, the story was about as flat as the type of books and stories it parodied. The ending part, with the reveal of the real villain was slightly better, but not as good as other books in this series.

Book Review – The World of Flashpoint Featuring Superman

  • Title: World of Flashpoint featuring Superman
  • Author: Scott Synder, Mike Carlin, Rex Ogle, Dan Jurgens
  • Artists: Lowell Francis, Rags Morales, Paulo Siqueira,
    Norm Rapmund, Gene Ha, Eduardo Francisco
  • Line: Stand Alone Graphic Novel
  • Characters: Superman, Lt. Sinclair, Project S1, Traci 13, Booster Gold, Guy Gardner, Jason Todd, Canterbury Cricket
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 6/29/2016

The World of Flashpoint featuring Superman is another volume in the World of Flashpoint series that fleshes out the characters and situations from Flashpoint, explaining in greater detail this alternate view of the DC world we know, created when Barry Allen travels back in time to save his mother. This volume also features four stories.

The Superman story is definitely the strangest of the bunch – and the focus of this volume is the more mystical aspects of the DC universe. The Superman story features Lt. Sinclair, recruited by General Lane (Lois’s father) to become a super-soldier. But Sinclair is a bit unbalanced before he starts the process and the experiments, drugs, and torture only make him worse. At the same time, the being who would be Superman is a small child – who is tortured, experimented upon, and abused. We even see Krypto the Super-dog, as well as what happens to him. Sinclair, meanwhile, develops strong mental powers, influencing Project S 1 (Flashpoint’s “Superman”). Both Sinclair and Project S escape, but Sinclair goes on a rampage. Project S also meets General Lane’s young daughter, Lois. When they escape, both Sinclair and Project S head to Europe to join the fray.

The next story, “World of Flashpoint”, features a character I couldn’t pin down as being a version of a known DC character – a magic user known as Traci 13. But she was fascinating and I really enjoyed her story. 13 is, as I said, a magic user. Her mother was a precog – who dies during the Atlantean attack on Europe. This creates a rift between her and her father (who becomes the leader of H.I.V.E.). Her father blames her for her mother’s death (to be precise for not preventing it) and tells her to not use magic. Traci 13 uses magic anyway, especially her teleporting ability. She meets with a fortune teller in New Orleans who becomes a good friend.

The fortune teller sends her on a mission to find other people to assist in the fight for Earth. This gives a wider view of what’s going on in the Flashpoint world – Red Tornado and his android brothers and sisters protect Japan but want nothing to do with the rest of the world; Nat Irons in Brazil leads a group fighting the Nazis who have taken over the country; Guy Gardner has found Buddism, let go of his anger, and opened a bar in Australia; and Jason Todd is a priest in Gotham. Although none of these people can help in Traci’s fight – Traci returns to H.I.V.E. and finds her father has primed the weapon that will take out New Themyscira and Atlantis – despite projected casualties in the billions. Traci 13 tries over and over to talk her father out of the destruction. Her father, who’d preached against the use of magic – is revealed to be a strong magic user who is soaked in dark magic. But Traci manages to finally get through to him. He makes a tremendous sacrifice, but Traci also manages to save him. It’s a great story with a lot of levels to it – especially as these aren’t characters we “know” at all. That Traci is a magic user reminds me a bit of Zatanna but Traci’s magic is different and far stronger. Her teleporting ability is also something we’ve seen a few times in DC characters.

The next story is Booster Gold’s story. Booster is the same guy we know – and, as a time traveler he knows the Flashpoint world is wrong. Booster, tries to figure out what is going on, and he’s not helped by the military strike team “Sea Devils” who are convinced he’s an Atlantean and keep trying to kill him and the woman with powers that he picks up as an ally. This story may be integrated with the graphic novel Time Masters: Vanishing Point.

The last story is “The Canterbury Cricket” – what happens when a former con man is turned into a giant cricket? This story tells us. Canterbury Cricket joins a number of bug-themed heroes in the Resistance. This story is short, and focuses more on Cricket’s back story, but it’s fun and an enjoyable read.

Other than the Superman story which was both confusing and very sad, this volume was excellent. I liked all four stories, even the Superman one, I just found that story to be sad. Booster’s story is great – I always like Booster Gold stories. Traci 13 is an awesome superhero in her own right, and intriguing as a new character. Even Canterbury Cricket, though that story is quite short, is something very different as both a hero and as a story.

Book Review – Doctor Who: The Beast of Babylon

  • Title: The Beast of Babylon
  • Series: Doctor Who Novelette Collection
  • Author: Charlie Higson
  • Characters: Ninth Doctor
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 07/05/2016

**Spoiler Alert** Doctor Who – The Beast of Babylon is part of the 50th Anniversary 12 Books – 12 Doctors collection of mini-books. This book features the Ninth Doctor, as played by Christopher Eccelston and takes place between Rose deciding not to travel with the Doctor in “Rose” and the Doctor coming back and asking her a second time, also in “Rose”. It’s a unique idea that the Doctor could have an entire adventure in that brief span we see as seconds in the first episode of the new series.

The novel starts with Ali having a picnic with her family, when the Doctor shows up. The Doctor, well, does Doctorish things, which seem a bit confusing because the story is from Ali’s point of view. Then Ali sits and thinks about how much she wants to travel and have adventures as she watches the moons over a lake at night. So we know Ali and her family are on an alien planet. The Doctor arrives and says that Ali has something he needs back, a silver orb. Ali does have it, but she wants to travel with the Doctor. The Doctor agrees.

As the Doctor takes the TARDIS to ancient Babylon on Earth, he explains he is after a Starman – a being created during the collapse of stars into black holes and white dwarfs and such. The silver orb can be used to send the Starman back where it came from before it can eat a planet. And it was the silver orb that the Doctor used to defeat the Starman on Ali’s planet. The Doctor also talks about the girl, Rose, he met on Earth.

When the Doctor arrives on Earth, he tells Ali to stay in the TARDIS. Ali listens, but full of curiosity, figures out how to use the TARDIS scanner. So she sees the Doctor getting in trouble. When the guards, who have hauled the Doctor off, attack the TARDIS – Ali strikes back, using her antenodes and even killing a man. Ali then wanders around, following the Doctor, trying to help, and causing havoc in a way. It’s at this point we realize she isn’t human.

The ancient Babylonians think Ali is a monster and the Doctor a sorcerer. However, when the Starman attacks it prevents the Doctor’s execution, and the Doctor and Ali work to defeat the Starman. The Doctor then rushes Ali in to the TARDIS. Ali is, it turns out, an ant-like being, but, obviously, intelligent. The women are the deadliest of her species. And she convinces the Doctor to give Rose another chance. Ali is returned to her home planet, glad to be home, and appreciative of her home.

This is a good story, especially the way Higson gradually reveals that Ali isn’t human, but that she is still a “person” so to speak. And I really liked seeing the Doctor with a non-human companion for a story. The Starman wasn’t a great villain – basically a monster to defeat that, despite being a strong threat, is rather easily defeated. Ancient Babylon and King Hammurabi make for a different setting for a Doctor Who story.

Recommended.

Book Review – The World of Flashpoint Featuring Green Lantern

  • Title: World of Flashpoint Featuring Green Lantern
  • Author: Adam Schlagman
  • Artists: Pornsak Pichetshote, Marco Castiello, Jeff Lemire
  • Line: Stand Alone Graphic Novel
  • Characters: Green Lantern (Abin Sur), Frankenstein, Oliver Queen, Hal Jordan
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 6/22/2016

The World of Flashpoint Featuring Green Lantern is one of a series of graphic novels that flesh-out the characters introduced in Flashpoint the alternative-universe story in which Barry Allen (the Flash) changes time – much to the the detriment of the world – by saving his mother. As with other graphic novels in this series, this one features four stories.

The first story is the story of Abin Sur Green Lantern of Earth – and I loved it. Abin Sur survives crash landing on Earth, so Hal Jordan never gets the Power Ring. Yet the story gives a great back story for Abin Sur, introduces his planet, and has an awful lot about Sinestro too. The Green Lantern Corps is trapped in a war on two fronts against the Black Lanterns on the one side (yes, Blackest Night not only is still happening but it happens simultaneously to Flashpoint) and the Manhunters on the other. As if having two of the worst Lantern enemies tearing the universe apart isn’t enough, Sinestro decides to interrogate Atroicious – which goes about as well as you’d think. The Guardians, being rather concerned with the state of the Universe also only send Abin Sur to Earth for a simple “find-and-retrieve” mission. Abin Sur, who it turns out, is a really nice guy, gets involved in the mess that is Flashpoint Earth. Sinestro tracks him down and well… things happen that I really don’t want to spoil. Needless to say it’s both satisfying and a great story that in a way makes you sad that Abin Sur died in the “real” DC Universe.

“Frankenstein and the Creatures of the Unknown” – This story would make for a great movie on it’s own. During World War II, a scientist discovers a way to turn normal soldiers into the great gothic creatures of Victorian fiction. The main characters would have all died without some form of treatment, including the scientist’s own daughter, who now resembles the Creature from the Black Lagoon. Also in the group are Frank (Frankenstein’s “Monster”), a werewolf, and a vampire. These “creatures” win the war for the Allies, but after the war they are moth-balled in storage. With Flashpoint, the group escape or are released. There’s a considerable amount of flashbacks and flash forwards to explain who the characters are, and where they came from as they search first for Nina’s father and later to find where she and the rest came from. The story has a great feel to it and mixes the modern and the gothic really well.

“Green Arrow Industries” presents us with an Oliver Queen, CEO of defense firm, Green Arrow Industries who’s precisely the opposite of the Oliver Queen we know from the normal DC Universe. This Oliver resembles the pre-Ironman Tony Stark in more than one way. Oliver steals alien technology, meta-human DNA, super abilities, even weapons like Heatwave’s and Citizen Cold’s guns and weaponizes them, then sells them to the highest bidder. His defense plants start in the US, but he’s recently outsourced them over seas to make even more money. This Oliver has eight children (at least) from various wives and girlfriends and knows none of them. It’s even his own daughter who comes after him for not thinking of the consequences of his actions.

“Hal Jordan” tells the story of what would happen to Jordan without the ring. Now a fighter pilot, still in love with Carol, totally unable to be serious enough to tell her so, and basically a guy who acts like Tom Cruise in Top Gun (not a compliment) Hal is a mess. Although Hal is still a hero in that he, and Carol (also a fighter pilot) are fighting hard in the losing war to save Earth from the Amazon-Aquaman war; Hal needed the steadying influence of the Green Lantern Corps and the ability to be part of something greater to lose his innate selfishness. Hal does, though, volunteer to drop the Green Arrow Industries untested bomb on the Amazons. If you’ve read Flashpoint you know how successful that was.

This is a great graphic novel. The art is consistently excellent. The stories are also a fascinating glimpse into what “might hav been” thanks to Flashpoint. For readers of the series it’s a must read.

Book Review – Doctor Who: Spore

  • Title: Spore
  • Series: Doctor Who Novelette Collection
  • Author: Alex Scarrow
  • Characters: Eighth Doctor
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 07/03/2016

Doctor Who – Spore is the eighth book in the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary 12 Books 12 Doctors collection and features the Eighth Doctor as played by Paul McGann. The Doctor has no companion in this story. The Doctor lands in Nevada in the dessert and immediately runs into a military investigative team. They are all in protective gear, but Major Platt jumps to the conclusion that The Doctor is from the CDC in Atlanta, this bit of mistaken identity doesn’t actually last long though and the Doctor ends up introducing himself as being from UNIT – which gives him the run of the operation.

The Doctor goes to the nearby town of Ft. Casey, where everyone is dead and only a black goo remains – of all organic matter (plants, people, even animals). The Doctor recognizes the signs – it’s an ancient spore which once terrified Gallifrey, killing thousands of Gallifreyans. In the town, the Doctor meets Cap’t. Evelyn Chan, the soul survivor of Major Platt’s original team. The Doctor explains what the Spore is – but far from a simple organic virus or biological entity, it’s designed. Whether it was a weapon or a form of terraforming is unknown. However, the surprising thing is that after the first stage of gathering organic material, and the second stage of making organic constructs for defense, it begins the third stage – constructing a brain – this brain will ask The Question. If the Question is answered correctly, the entity will self-destruct, leaving the intelligent species alone. But if the species answers incorrectly – the entire planet will succumb to biological destruction. The Doctor enters into conversation with the entity and gambles.

This was a good short story. The idea of an intelligent virus or entity was unusual. And the story, though at first sounding like The Andromeda Strain actually ends in a much better way and is more intelligent.

Recommended.

Glee Season 1 Review

  • Series Title: Glee
  • Season: Season 1
  • Episodes: 22 Episodes
  • Discs: 4 (Blu-ray)
  • Network: Fox
  • Cast: Matthew Morrison, Jane Lynch, Chris Colfer, Lea Michele, Kevin McHale, Amber Riley, Jenna Ushkowitz
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

Glee was an extremely popular series that I somehow managed to miss. Unfortunately, the first season is extremely disappointing and at times even painful to watch. The series follows the adventures and misadventures of a group of misfit kids who manage to grow and learn by becoming members of the Glee Club at a small town Ohio high school. It’s an interesting premise at least. Musicals are one of my guilty pleasures, so I really should have enjoyed this show.

Unfortunately, Glee has some of the worst writing I have ever seen. The characters aren’t characters – they are stereotypes: the gay kid, the fat Black girl, the kid in a wheel chair, the dumb cheerleader, the spoiled Jewish brat. The stereotypes are offensive – and represent short cuts in writing. Rather than let us know what it’s like to be in a wheelchair, or overweight, or be raised by two gay Dads, or to be a gay high school boy – this show instead merely gives us stereotypes, especially in the first half of the season. The kid in a wheelchair doesn’t even get a name until ten episodes in. Sue, the cheerleading coach even calls Artie, “cripple”. Now, Sue is the series “bad guy”, but the principal uses the same extremely offensive word to describe Artie, as well as using “budget” as an excuse to deny him basics like handicap-accessible school transportation, a handicap-accessible entrance to the school (other than through the loading dock), and one has to wonder about bathrooms. This is a clear example of Title IX violations (and violations of the ADA) and would get the school sued. But Artie isn’t the only kid treated in deplorable fashion by the writers of this show. Rachel constantly mentions her two gay dads, but we never, ever see them, even when Rachel gets suddenly curious about her birth mother (a surrogate). The show could have shown us Rachel asking her fathers some pointed questions, and gotten real drama and emotion out of the issues of adoption and surrogacy. But instead, her dads are always absent and it’s Rachel who finds her mother, a showbiz diva and show choir coach of the rival high school glee club, Vocal Adrenaline.

The adults in this show are even worse than the kids. At least the kids are likable, especially as we learn more about them (yes, this is one of those ensemble shows that eventually focuses an episode or two on each main character). We have Will Schuester, the Glee Club coach (and Spanish teacher), who is the perfect teacher and perfect guy. He’s married to Terri, his high school sweetheart, a materialistic woman who is more focused on keeping up with the Jones than being happy or letting Will be happy. She even fakes a pregnancy when she fears Will wants to leave her. He eventually figures this out and they divorce. Good riddance, Terri.

Sue Sylvester is the cheerleading coach, she hates Will with a passion, and hates the Glee club. We are given absolutely no reason for this whatsoever. Sue is rude, cruel, mean-spirited, and dumb. She’s conniving as well. The only reason we are given for her hatred of Glee is that they are “taking her budget”, but considering Sue’s champion cheerleaders have apparently the world’s largest budget, she shouldn’t even care about the pennies going to Glee. Sue is also just as terrible to her own cheerleaders as she is to every one else – making fun of the girl’s bodies, firing her team captain when it becomes obvious she’s pregnant, forcing two girls to join Glee as her spies, etc. Sue even gets a commentary spot on the local news where “Sue Sees It” encourages littering and other such drivel. Sue might be interesting if we ever learned why she hates Will (I mean, What did he do – ignore her in high school? Tell her she couldn’t sing and kick her out of the glee club?), but since we don’t – she becomes a cardboard villain. The only hint we get is Sue is jealous of Will – which makes no sense at all. Late in the season, Will finally takes their rivalry to her and gives Sue a well-deserved dose of her own medicine.

Other characters include Emma, the OCD guidance counselor who is not so secretly in love with Will. Or “has a crush” might be more accurate, because when they finally start dating, she pulls way back. Emma is likable, but written as weak and a bit dumb because of her OCD (which has her constantly cleaning the teacher’s lounge, and using wet wipes on her grapes before eating them), so she becomes a caricature rather than a character. The gym coach loves Emma, and even convinces her to marry him as a “second choice” since Will is unavailable. Needless to say, the marriage falls through and we never see the gym coach again. The principal rounds out the characters – he’s relatively fair, though he ends up under Sue’s thumb when she drugs him and takes sexual blackmail pictures of the two in bed.

The only thing Glee has going for it are the musical numbers. The singing and dancing are fantastic, as is the Broadway Musical Film style choreography. I was continuously impressed by the singing, dancing, and song craft in this show. At times, it is obvious (at least on Blu-ray) that the characters are lip syncing, but it’s a minor issue. I’m used to musicals with bad (or no) plots and good dancing, but it’s a lot harder to overlook bad plots, weak characterization, and extremely bad writing for 22 hours rather than two or three. Even though I know some of the actors from The Flash and Supergirl were eventually on Glee, I will not be buying more of this series. I was very disappointed, and that’s sad, because I really wanted to like it.