Non-Fiction Book Review – The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy

  • Title: The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Geek Girls
  • Author: Sam Maggs
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 06/10/2015

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and some aspects of it are very well-researched. The resources pages at the back are definitely going to be worth checking out. Sam, by the way, is short for Samantha.

This book is half guidebook how-to manual and half feminist celebration of fangirls. In many ways, it could have been sub-titled, “The Fangirl’s Guide to Tumblr”, though it does venture beyond that, especially in the areas of Anime, Comics, and Gaming.

What I found, um, intriguing is that it seems to really reflect a completely different generation. The fangirls celebrated in this book have grown up with Tumblr, Twitter, youTube, and really big conventions like San Diego Comic Con and DragonCon – yet no mention is made of the the traditional media cons, especially ones that were originally run by women (some still are) and which catered to female fans. Yes, I’m talking about MediawestCon, Chicago TARDIS, and the traditional Star Trek and other conventions. It just seems that smaller, local, fan-run conventions aren’t even on the author’s radar. (Even Toronto Trek/Polaris/whatever-they’re-calling-it this year isn’t mentioned in the conventions section or the resources – and the author is from Toronto.) It just seemed strange. And if your advising 18-14 year old women to “yes, SDCC, just go” – it seemed to me that maybe she should have at least suggested checking out your local Comics/Gaming/SF/Media con. For one thing, it’s easier to get your feet wet at a convention with a few hundred people or even 1000, rather than one of the biggest conventions in the US.

But on the other hand, part of the message of the book is “Be Fearless”. OK, be safe but be fearless. And that is a really good message – and it’s a great message for young, enthusiastic girls. For once, at least this book isn’t full of scare-mongering about the Internet.

Her section on Cosplay is brilliant. Her discussion of “Cosplay is not consent” explains exactly what that means, what to do if you are harassed (talk to con security and/or volunteers). It’s not complicated. And her explanation of the whats, whys, hows, and even whos of Cosplay was also very instructive. I loved learning about how women and men who Costume make, fabricate, put together, and even buy or commission costumes. (It’s not as hard as I always assumed!)

She’s also without restraint teaching about respect for creativity, respect for the creators of art (be it written, drawn, crafted, sewn, or any other form of fan art). No whiny, “but that’s illegal” arguments here. And Sam never says some types of art, such as Cosplay, are more valid than others, such as fan fiction, or blogging about your OTP. She’s pretty even handed about every fangirl’s opinion is OK. She constantly reminds the reader to respect other girl’s opinions and likes – “even if their OTP is your NOTP”. If that confuses you, it’s updated IDIC, or a celebration of diversity – all diversity. OTP is One True Pairing or the romantic pair from a book, TV show, movie, video game, comic, or magna that you really love – write fan fiction about, blog about on Tumblr, and just see as your perfect romantic pairing that must get together. For fangirls, that pairing can be male/female, male/male, female/female, whatever. It can be a pair that actually is canon to TV show, film, comic, etc. – or not so much. A NOTP is Never or Not OTP, basically the couple you can never see together, the couple that does not rock your boat even if it’s canon. Stories that bring romance to a couple, whether canon to the show or not, “ship” characters, as in “relationship”. Canon, though sometimes complicated – ask someone to explain Star Wars canon sometime, is generally the actual work. Episodes of a TV series; the film as it was released; the actual book(s). Etc. IDIC is the Star Trek philosophy of “Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations”, or basically – respect for people in all their diverse wonderfulness. Sam Maggs makes it very clear, that being rude to people who you disagree with, especially over your favorite and not-favorite geek things, is not cool.

The books includes descriptions and advice for dealing with Internet Trolls as well (up to and including how to contact moderators, block another account, contact law enforcement, etc.) And she stresses safety for in-person meetings such as conventions.

The book also includes a enlightening, well-written, intelligent explanation of feminism. I found myself nodding and fist-pumping the air (figuratively) over that chapter, because yes. The Myths of Feminism was especially well written.

Highly recommended to any fan, older fans who might want to try learning about their younger cohort, younger fans who have mastered Tumblr and want to branch out into modern fandom, media studies students (try not to let the informal language put you off), and the reporter scratching their head and saying, huh? It’s a fun, short, highly recommended read.

Let me know what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.