Book Review – Doctor Who: Timewyrm: Apocalypse

  • Title: Timewyrm: Apocalypse
  • Series: Virgin Publishing New Doctor Who Adventures
  • Author: Nigel Robinson
  • Characters: Seventh Doctor, Ace
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 11/02/2017

Timewyrm: Apocalypse is the third volume of the Virgin Publishing Doctor Who New Adventures opening “Timewyrm” mini-series. The story features the Seventh Doctor and Ace. The TARDIS lands on a planet that seems to be perfect, which Ace, of course, immediately dislikes. The Doctor, however, surprisingly also dislikes the planet – finding the peace and harmony, and content people to be artificial. He and Ace decide they must figure out what’s going on after rescuing a young man who falls off a cliff, into the ocean and is quite beat-up by the rocks. Yet the next day, he’s fine without so much as a scratch or a bruise.

The main society on the planet is the Kirith, who live their days having all their needs from shelter to food taken care of by the Panjistri. The Panjistri are aliens who landed on the planet generations ago and saved the Kirith from war, destruction, and death. The Kirith can study or do whatever they like. Even leaving their city isn’t forbidden, it’s just considered a bad idea because of the dangers outside it.

The most talented of the Kirith are invited to study with the Panjistri, but instead of returning to teach in ten years, they never return. However, no one objects because as soon as a great artist, or musician, or dancer goes to the Panjistri – everyone forgets that person. This is a bit suspicious, but because of the wide-spread amnesia, it’s not something Ace and the Doctor learn about right away.

Ace convinces Raphael, the boy they had rescued, to go exploring with her outside the city. They discover in the Harbours, the embarkation point for the ships to the island of the Panjistri, a underground lab devoted to grotesque genetic experiments. They escape and meet the Unlike, the mutated survivors of the experiments. One of the Unlike reveals the food the Kirith eat every day is Soylent Green, opps, I mean, it’s made from people, specifically the left over genetic experiments and the dead of the city.

Ace, Raphael, and the Unlike return to the city. Meeting up with Miríl, a scholar, they start a revolution by cutting off the food supplies and electric power. This results in both unrest and a lot of death and destruction. But the Doctor has already left or been taken to the Harbours. The return there, and Raphael is forced to kill one of the worst genetic experiments. He’s devastated by this.

They steal a hovercraft and head to the Island to rescue the Doctor.

There they discover the Matriarch of the Panjistri is the Timewyrm. In defeating her, Raphael dies, taking over the “God Engine”, Miríl had died on the hovercraft trip to the Island. The society is broken and must discover for themselves how to survive without help, and Ace and the Doctor escape.

Timewyrm: Apocalypse is one case where everyone is actually much worse off after the Doctor and Ace interfere than they were before. Although the people of Kirith are described as a “stagnant” civilization, as they are also genetic constructs, one wonders if they are even capable of caring for themselves and creating their own civilization, now that their protectors are gone. In many ways, and not to be mean, the Kirith are like sheep or cattle – and the Doctor and Ace have just destroyed the farmers and the farm – then left, expecting the sheep (or cattle) to care for themselves. If the people of Kirith were being exploited the interference might have made sense, but these are happy, contented people. The Doctor’s argument that they need to be hungry to be alive sounds, well, like an argument made by someone’s who’s never been hungry and therefore romanticizes poverty. And there’s nothing “romantic” about being poor and starving.

The Panjistri are culling the “best of the best” to feed the Timewyrm’s GodEngine as the Doctor calls it, and the Panjistri’s genetic experiments are pretty horrible – but the novel doesn’t really portray those as being “bad”, but more of as side effects. That was disturbing.

Also, Timewyrm: Apocalypse feels very derivative, which doesn’t help.

Overall, this book was only OK. I didn’t care for it. It is one of the middle volumes of a four-book series, though, so hopefully the finale will make it worth the time spent reading it. Not really recommended, but because of it’s place in the series, it must be read, I guess.

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