Arrowverse – Invasion! Review

  • Series: The Flash, Arrow, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow
  • Second Arrowverse Crossover Special: Invasion!
  • Episodes: 4
  • Discs: Episodes Located in Individual Boxed Season Sets
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Stephen Amell, Melissa Benoist, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Emily Bett Rickards, Victor Garber, Caity Lotz, Chyler Leigh, Franz Drameh
  • Network: CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

The first full crossover event between all four of CW’s DC Superhero shows includes episodes of Supergirl (Season 2 Episode 8: “Medusa”), The Flash (Season 3 Episode 8: “Invasion! Part 1”), Arrow (Season 5 Episode 8: “Invasion! Part 2”), and Legends of Tomorrow (Season 2 Episode 7: “Invasion! part 3”). The Supergirl episode is more of a preview or “part zero” as a breach keeps opening around Kara and then disappearing. Kara meanwhile is dealing with Cadmus releasing a Kryptonian virus that kills all aliens. At the very end of the episode, Barry and Cisco arrive and ask Kara for her help.

Kara joins Barry and Cisco and is introduced to everyone and the plot. An alien spacecraft crashes in downtown Central City, bringing with it some very unfriendly aliens. The Dominators had previously been to Earth in the 1950s where they kidnapped people “for intel” according to Lyla. Kara is introduced to everyone, and as more characters join Barry’s crew – the characters from Arrow and Legends, specifically, everyone is introduced to everyone else. It’s very much like the great comic book crossover events where various characters come together to combat a major threat.

Invasion! is great in that we see all our characters interacting, together, and broken up into smaller groups, each with their individual assignments, including the Waverider heading back to the 1950s to kidnap a Dominator so the heroes can figure out what they want. I enjoyed seeing Cisco, Felicity, Curtis, and Caitlin working together as “Team Science” and “Tech Support”. And since this is just post-Flashpoint for The Flash, everyone is dealing with the repercussions of that, especially Cisco who’s brother Dante died as a result of Flashpoint. Also, the Legends have a message from “future Barry” not to trust current Barry. This brings some depth to a story that otherwise is pretty much just a big fight with all the heroes costumed or not playing their part. This is also the episode that introduces Lily Stein, Dr. Stein’s daughter who was created by his meeting his younger self in an episode of Legends of Tomorrow.

Oliver, Thea, Ray, Sara, and John Diggle are kidnapped by the Dominators and put into a dream state where Oliver and his father never got on the Gambit – so Moira and Robert Quinn are alive and Oliver is about to marry Laurel Lance. John is the Green Arrow. Sara is just living her life. Eventually, Oliver realizes as perfect as this fantasy life is – it’s not real, and they must break out of the illusion. They do and find themselves on an alien spaceship. They escape and their escape craft is rescued by the Waverider before it’s can be destroyed by the Dominators.

Finally, the ultimate plan of the Dominators becomes clear. They consider Metahumans a threat and have come to Earth to eliminate that “threat”. Curiously, Rene Rameriz, Wild Dog, is also showing his hatred and prejudice against Metas and Superheros, basically being a jerk in the one episode where he is heavily featured. He even seems to think eliminating Metas is a good idea.

The heroes have to fight off the Dominators. Firestorm will transmute the Dominator Metabomb into water. Supergirl stands off against the “Man in Glasses” an X-files-like character who was there during the previous Dominator invasion, ordered the torture of one of the aliens, and shows-up when the Dominators do to suppress information about the incident and take charge, even pushing aside Lyla and ARGUS. The Heroes fight is successful. Especially, after their bomb is turned into water the Dominators just leave.

The good about this crossover. It does feel like a big comic book crossover event – with lots of characters (the entire casts of Arrow, The Flash, Supergirl, and Legends of Tomorrow are seen at least briefly, and the core casts have featured roles). There are some more emotional parts to the story – Cisco’s visible anger at Barry, though he eventually learns to let go as he realizes after traveling to the past with Felicity in the Waverider how easy it is to accidentally change the past. And Stein’s acceptance of his daughter really works in this story. But, at the end – it’s a slugfest: heroes versus aliens, that’s it.

Although the Supergirl episode is really more of a prologue than a full part of the story, it is thematically linked. Cadmus, led by Lillian Luthor, mother of Lex and Lena Luthor, wants to destroy all aliens, good, “bad”, or indifferent. Actually, as racists, they believe all aliens are bad and must die to leave America clean for the humans. Yes, it’s racist. But at least their plan is seen as evil, and Kara stops it fairly easily, with some help from Lena. The Dominators, who want to eliminate all Metas are the same. They don’t care if some Metas might be good. They consider anyone with power to be a threat and someone that must be eliminated. Again, they are racists who are willing to commit genocide (like Lillian) to preserve themselves. Rene Rameriz is the same – he clearly hates Metas and Superheros and never changes his mind, despite working with a couple dozen people with powers or talented mortals who put on a mask and become a hero.

I recommend Invasion! I do wish that CW and/or Warner Brothers would put all the crossovers out on individual DVDs or Blu-Rays like movies. It is a little awkward to pull out different DVD sets to watch the various episodes. And I had to look-up the order online when I want to watch this again. But it’s a not insurmountable problem, it’s just a little awkward.

You can also read My Review of Crisis on Earth-X the next crossover.

Legends of Tomorrow Season 4 Review

  • Series Title: Legends of Tomorrow
  • Season: Season 4
  • Episodes: 16
  • Discs: 2 (Blu-Ray) (DVD set is 3 discs)
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Caity Lotz, Brandon Routh, Maise Richardson-Sellers, Dominic Purcell, Nick Zano, Tala Ashe, Matt Ryan, Jes Macallen, Adam Tsekhman
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

This review will contain spoilers for Season 4 of Legends of Tomorrow

As the tease at the end of Season 3 promised, Season 4 brings magic into the Legends of Tomorrow universe and John Constantine becomes a regular. The first half of the season has relatively self-contained episodes, as the Legends chase magical creatures before they can mess-up the timeline. These episodes though are so very character-centric and each one allows our characters to shine. In the third episode of Season 4, the Legends meet a punk shapeshifter in 1970s London. Although Constantine wants to send the creature to hell, as he had previous magical creatures they had met, Ray Palmer, who has gotten to know Charlie, convinces the Legends to capture her instead. First imprisoned by the Legends, Charlie eventually becomes one of them, assisting on the current mission. She also looks like Amaya.

The two-part midseason finale, “Hell No, Dolly!” and “Legends of To-Meow-Meow” gives us more information on Constantine, including explaining why he’s been in a weird headspace all season and introduces the season’s villain, a demon called Neron, who bonded with Constantine’s lover Des (Desmond) forcing Constantine to send them both to hell. Being in the same city at the same time that he lost his lover, Constantine cannot resist trying to change things and save Des. But when he does he breaks time. He and Charlie, who helped run interference while he was on his unsanctioned solo mission, return to the jump ship and find Zari’s been turned into a cat.  In “Legends of To-Meow-Meow” Constantine, Charlie, and Zari with help from Nora and Mona attempt to find a solution that will allow them to save Des, allow Charlie to keep her shapeshifting powers, but that won’t have the Legends die – because in this new broken universe, members of the Legends team keep dying in magical creature attacks. These losses cause the Legends to become reckless killers. Although the episode expresses this with various genre-style “TV series”, complete with credit sequences, including, “Guardians of the Chronology” (an 1980s-style, all male-led, action show with lots of guns and violence), “Sirens of Spacetime” (in “Charlie’s Angels” style – Sara, Ava, and Gideon are action stars) and “Puppets of Tomorrow” (the Legends have been turned into singing puppets). But the only way to prevent disaster is to prevent John from changing time in the first place.

The second half of the season features more magic, Mona becomes a regular – despite being essentially a werewolf, and Nora Darhk also, through her friendship with Ray Palmer, joins the crew. It’s not a straight or easy transition for either Nora or Mona. Mona starts as the girl who delivers food to the bureau (and is continuously mind-wiped by Gary) to the creature keeper to falling for a Kaupe named Konané to being scratched/bit by Konané and becoming a Kaupe herself. Mona’s journey includes learning both to control and embrace “Wolfie” – her werewolf side. Nora had escaped the time bureau using the time stone Ray gave her, but when John Constantine goes too far to save a young camper – only Nora can save him. Ray finds her and Nora learns she can use and control her power without becoming evil. She too joins the Legends but is still considered a fugitive.

Throughout the season Nate is mostly based at the Time Bureau, which leads to some interesting confrontations with his father. Henry Haywood seems to behind a plot to torture the captured magical creatures. Too late, Nate, John and the others discover Henry had made a bargain with the demon Neron for funding. When Henry tries to reject the demon, Neron kills him. Nora, a captive herself, feels Neron’s attack but when she tries to stop it, she’s caught and accused, of course, of killing Henry. Fortunately, Ray, Nate, and John believe her when she says she didn’t do it. John discovers Neron’s kidnapped Ava to be a new vessel for his “Tabitha”. John sends Sara to Ava’s personal purgatory to rescue her. It proves to be a test (and a successful one) of their relationship, which has suffered a few setbacks due to the Legends “harboring” Charlie and Nora.

Mona, Zari, Sara, and Charlie end-up solving a magical alert when Jane Austin’s books disappear. Mona not only meets her favorite author, but Zari confronts the Hindu god of love who is causing chaos. Mona is initially upset with Jane’s practical advice on love (marrying for security not love) but when she “wolfs out” and confronts Jane again, Jane is more honest, telling her not only she does believe in love, but that she rejected her only marriage prospect because she didn’t love or respect him. She then says that she and her sister will be penniless. Mona assures her she will publish her writing and it will be timeless, and she is her favorite author. Jane helps Mona to embrace Wolfie. Meanwhile, Zari is nearly talked into marriage by the Hindu god, leading to a fabulous Bollywood-style musical number. The Legends prevent her from making a mistake and free the young man who is being possessed. The unexpected musical number is wonderful!

The rest of the season focuses on finding a way to stop Neron, someone Constantine has failed to stop once. Ray, unfortunately, gets possessed by Neron, and starts a campaign to raise fear and paranoia – he even introduces a new app to report monster sightings. The app’s terms of service include the statement that “in return for using this service the user signs over their eternal soul to the demon Neron”. Neron is gathering souls to confront the Triumvirate that rules Hell. Also, by owning people and stirring up fear, hatred, and paranoia, he makes the atmosphere ripe for all sorts of trouble. When he doesn’t get enough downloads he arranges a “monster attack” during congressional hearings into monsters. Zari remarks that this is how her dystopia started – then they passed the anti-meta act and soon after ARGUS took total control. She and her family were forced to move to a ghetto (restricted living) and later her brother and family were killed – all because of their religion (Muslim). But Nate also discovers his father’s plan wasn’t to “out” magical creatures, or to turn them into weapons, but to capture and train them for a magical theme park called HeyWorld. Zari discovers that if the Legends are able to successfully start HeyWorld and get people to believe magic is well, magical and wonderful, she can save her family and change the future. But she has to stay on the ship in the temporal zone or she’ll lose her memories if time changes.

Constantine finds out that Ray made a bargain to let Neron take him over if Neron didn’t kill Nate. Nate is willing to sacrifice himself – if that’s the only way to stop Neron. The Legends have Mick Rory, now an accomplished romance writer (a thread slowly introduced in season 3), create HeyWorld using the journal of Bridget that creates whatever a writer can imagine. But they still have to convince people that magical creatures are magical and wonderful, not dangerous and evil. Sara, Nate, and Gary try a stage show that is bombing badly (while the Monitor sits in the stands, munching popcorn). But when Tabitha (the fairy godmother), and Constantine (returned from Hell) arrive it becomes more of a confrontation. Nate and Charlie switch places, tricking Neron into “killing” Nate. Zari arrives when she sees that it’s Nate who died. Neron’s hold over Ray is broken and he’s sent back to hell. Zari gets everyone to sing Henry Heywood’s favorite song to revive Nate. But, although the timeline is now safe, and Zari’s dystopia is erased, she is replaced by her brother who is now the air totem bearer. Nate doesn’t seem to remember Zari. In Hell, Astra cashes in the soul coins she stole from Neron’s vault (where Constantine and Nora went in search of Ray’s coin) – in a set-up for next season.

Although not quite as surprisingly wonderful and marvelous as the season finale for Season 3, Season 4 still has a fun finale. I loved the “looking for magic” theme that developed from “magical creatures are evil – send them to hell” to “OK, some magical creatures are all right” to “let’s live in concert and happiness with magical creatures”. And the singing scene was similar to saving Tinkerbell by clapping in Peter Pan. But while the sing-along is going on, Nate has a much-needed final conversation with his father, Hank.

We also get some wonderful girl power this season – Legends has gone from Sara being the only female member of the crew (albeit the captain) to having four members: Sara, Zari, Charlie, and Mona – plus regular appearances by Ava and occasional ones by Gideon as more than just a computer voice. Because the cast, in general, has gotten so large (the guys include Mick, John, Nate, Ray, and Gary) many of the episodes have two or three plots with the crew being split into groups. (Such as the wonderful, “The Eggplant, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” – where Nate and Zari go on a date in the 1930s and find a dragon egg, Ray figures out Nora didn’t kill Hank, and Sara has to save Ava from Purgatory.) This allows the women to shine and work together, while at the same time gives everyone something to do. Even “quarterbacking” from the Waverider isn’t a way to shove a character aside for a story or two. And Sirens of Spacetime – starring Gideon, Ava, and Sara – I just love it!

I highly recommend Legends of Tomorrow, especially seasons 3 and 4 – the show just gets more original and more magical every season and its tons of fun to watch. Because the Legends were not involved in this season’s crossover it is not included on the Blu-Ray or DVD set.

Read my Review of Legends of Tomorrow Season 1.
Read my Review of Legends of Tomorrow Season 2.
Read my Review of Legends of Tomorrow Season 3.

Crisis on Earth-X Review

  • Series: The Flash, Arrow, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow
  • Third Arrowverse Crossover Special: Crisis on Earth-X
  • Episodes: 4
  • Discs: 1
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Stephen Amell, Melissa Benoist, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Emily Bett Rickards, Victor Garber, Caity Lotz, Chyler Leigh, Franz Drameh, Paul Blackthorne, Jeremy Jordan, Wentworth Miller, Russell Tovey
  • Network: CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

Barry and Supergirl arrive, and a few moments later Green Arrow pulls up on a motorcycle, “Just a quick reminder, super speed – I don’t have it.” – Oliver Queen, the Green Arrow

“My grandparents didn’t survive the Holocaust so the world could be ruled by Nazis. So if you want Kara, you gotta’ go through me and even if you do, you’re not going to win. Because we will not back down, we will keep fighting. So get the hell off our Earth while you still can.” – Felicity.

Just like DC Comics occasionally does crossovers between two or more books, and all their characters live in the same “universe”, from the very beginning all the “Arrowverse” shows have been clearly in the same universe, and even though Kara Danvers (Supergirl) is on another Earth, she has met Barry Allen (the Flash) and company before, and the characters from Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow in the previous crossover, “Invasion”. “Crisis on Earth-X” starts innocently enough, with all our characters gathered together for Barry and Iris’s wedding. But just as their minister gets to the part about, “Does anyone object to the marriage of this couple?” Nazis burst in and a huge fight erupts. All of our heroes use their powers to fight off the Nazis, despite being dressed for a wedding. It’s total chaos.

Dr. Harry Wells explains that there is a 53rd Earth, beyond the known 52 Earths of the Multiverse. It’s a place so awful, it’s only known as Earth-X because no one would want to travel there. It’s the Earth where the Nazis won World War II. To make matters worse, in this version, Oliver’s doppelganger is the current führer of the Nazi-world and his wife is Overgirl, an evil Nazi version of Supergirl. First, evil Oliver and Evil Supergirl and their soldiers break into a lab and steal a prism, and then they come after Supergirl. Their plan? Well, Overgirl is dying after being exposed to too much sunlight so they’ve come to Earth One to kill Supergirl, take her heart, and implant it in Overgirl – because Supergirl would be the perfect donor. The Nazis manage to take over Star Labs and send half of our large group of Heroes to Earth-X and the rest are locked up in the pipeline. They miss Felicity and Iris though, who manage to be badass in trying to rescue everyone. Felicity and Iris also send a distress call to the Legends.

On Earth-X, Oliver, Barry, Alex Danvers, and company are locked in a cage with others in black and white striped convict clothes, with badges pinned to their chests. They meet Ray, and when Jax asks what he “did wrong” to be locked up, Ray responds, “I loved the wrong person”. Alex and Sara, who shared a one night stand the night before the ill-fated wedding, look knowingly at each other. The doppelganger of Captain Lance arrives and separates out our heroes and Ray, and leads them to a trench, they are told to stand on the edge, and a firing squad is readied. But at the last minute, Leonard Snart (“Leo”) arrives and rescues them all. They are taken to the base camp of the Freedom Fighters and meet General Winn Schott. The good – they are now in with a group that’s organized to fight and overthrow the Nazis. The bad? Their main plan is to destroy the Nazis’ new doomsday weapon, which happens to be housed with the interworld transport terminal that’s the only way for the Legends to get home. They also discover Ray is actually from Earth 1 and he and Leo are partners.

On Earth-X, the heroes need to convince Winn to give them a shot at getting to the portal before Winn uses a secret weapon of his own to blow it up. Meanwhile, on Earth One, Iris and Felicity are trying to get Cisco and anyone else locked in the Pipeline free, and stop Reverse Flash (who is in league with Evil Oliver and Overgirl) from killing Supergirl. They delay the operation that would kill Kara by turning off the power. When Felicity is caught, she tries to stand up to Thawne, but he threatens to kill her, and she gives up the encryption code for getting the power on. Thawne again ties Kara down under Red Light lamps to weaken her, but just as he’s about to cut her open, Ray, the Atom, stops him. The rest of the Legends – The Atom, Amaya, Zari, and Nate have arrived. They get everyone out of the Pipeline and rescue Kara. Everyone else returns from Earth-X, but Martin was shot during the mission to get to the inter-Earth Gateway. Martin Stein is dying, and because he is linked with Jefferson, he is dying also. Cisco, however, had designed, with help from Caitlin, a serum that would safely separate Martin and Jefferson but at the cost of the loss of their powers. Martin takes the serum as he lies dying in the Waverider’s med bay, to save Jefferson.

Even though everyone has returned to Earth One safely, except for Martin, and they’ve rescued Kara. Reverse-Flash is still determined to use their Nazi Waverider to launch an invasion of Earth One and Evil Oliver is still determined to kill Supergirl to save Overgirl. They also discover that not only will Overgirl’s overexposure to sunlight kill her, but she’s a living bomb who will explode with the power of a neutron bomb. Part four largely consists of major fight scenes, and a money shot of all the heroes, in costume, just all-out fighting back against a troop of black and red uniformed Nazis. Nazis who have just stormed a city block, randomly killing anyone they come across. Everyone has their part in the fight. Iris and our Wells are on the Waverider fighting the Nazi one but can’t get through their shields. Supergirl teases Overgirl out to fight, and Overgirl breaks through a window in her own ship, this allows Killer Frost, Amaya and Zari access into the ship to fight Nazis, take it over, and then lower the shields. Vibe arrives to transport them off just in time before the ship is destroyed by the Waverider’s missiles. Kara takes Overgirl Up, Up, and Away, so she can safely explode. Evil Oliver is devastated by the loss of his wife. Oliver kills his evil doppelganger.

Our heroes clean up against the Nazis and exile them back to Earth-X. Everyone attends Martin’s funeral, then one by one, or in small groups, they head back to their own homes. The Ray returns to Earth-X, but Snart decides to stay on Earth One for a short time. Barry brings Diggle to a lakeside park and he marries not only Iris and Barry but Felicity and Oliver.

On the one hand, “Crisis on Earth-X” has some very satisfying moments – superheroes and their human non-powered companions punching Nazis and being badass (especially Iris, Felicity, Alex, and Sara all get to have some great moments. When they finally arrive, Zari and Amaya aren’t left out of the girl power fun.) But the entire crossover is fight-heavy and at times plot light. There is some horrific imagery, but also moments of pure power and generosity such as our Oliver breaking his impersonation of his evil self to save the Earth-X Felicity and Felicity herself standing up to the Nazis that invade Star Labs. Evil Oliver though has an almost understandable goal – to save his wife, whom he clearly loves – Overgirl. Still, his plan, to kill Kara to save Overgirl is horrific. And one has to wonder how he knew to find Supergirl on Earth One since she normally lives on Earth 38. Also, once most of our characters are on Earth-X, their one mission is to return home. General Winn Schott is incredibly stubborn about wanting to destroy the inter-Earth portal before everyone can return home. And Flash and the Ray end up destroying his weapon, which turns out to be Red Tornado, so you have to wonder what that did to Schott’s resistance. But overall, considering the logistics of having so many characters, even in a four-hour special, and giving all of them screen time and stories, the crossover works. I also really, really liked The Ray (Russell Tovey of the original British Being Human) and cuddly Leonard Snart (Wentworth Miller).

Note: Over-exposure to sunlight giving Superman cancer, or at least a sort of cancer, is the plot of All-Star Superman.

Note 2: The first episode opens with a brief preview of Earth-X, which has red skies and yellow lightning, a reference perhaps to the future Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Note 3: Crisis on Earth-X, all four parts, is included in full on the Blu-Ray edition of Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow. The individual DVD box sets of Arrow (Season 6), Supergirl (Season 3), The Flash (Season 4), and Legends (Season 3), on the other hand, only include their individual episode of the crossover.

Read My Review of Invasion! The first Arrowverse 4-show crossover.

Legends of Tomorrow Season 3 Review

  • Series Title: Legends of Tomorrow
  • Season: Season 3
  • Episodes: 18
  • Discs: 4
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Caity Lotz, Brandon Routh, Arthur Darvill, Franz Drameh, Victor Garber, Maise Richardson-Sellers, Dominic Purcell, Nick Zano, Tala Ashe, Neal McDonough, Matt Ryan, Wentworth Miller, John Noble
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

This review will contain spoilers for Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow.

Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow picks up where Season 2 left off, with the Legends discovering they “broke time”. However, no sooner do they realize this than the team runs in to Rip Hunter. Hunter explains he’s spent the last five years building the Time Bureau specifically to deal with anachronisms caused by breaks to Time. The Legends borrow the Waverider again and set off to fix Time and remove the anachronisms.

The early episodes of Legends for Season 3 are pretty self-contained and stand-alone until “Crisis on Earth X” the massive four-show crossover event. After the crossover, the episodes flow into each other, but there is still a tendency for the stories to be somewhat self-contained, more so than other CW DC series.

Besides fixing anachronisms – and managing to make things worse, as usual for the Legends, they also learn that by breaking Time there is a danger that a demon by the name of Mallus will be released from its prison. The only way to stop Mallus is by gathering the six stones of the Zambesi tribe. Much of the season has the Legends accidentally or intentionally gathering the stones, which represent: Spirit, Death, Water, Air, Earth, and Fire. Amalya has the Spirit totem, though at one point in the season it is stolen from her and the Legends have to get it back. In the third episode of the season, the Legend crew travels to a dystopian 2042 where Zari joins the crew. She possesses the Air Totem. Kuasa is a woman who possesses the Water Totem and is working with Damien Darhk. At first, Darhk seems to be up to his old tricks – causing anachronisms to help break the prison holding Mallus because he can. But when Mallus possesses his daughter, Nora, Darhk comes to realize that if the demon is released his daughter will die and he will lose her forever. The redemption of Damien Darhk is a fascinating story, especially considering he was the main villain for a year on Arrow and part of a threesome of villains on last year’s season of Legends of Tomorrow. Neal McDonough is brilliant in the part of Damien Darhk though so it is great to see him finally redeemed.

Season 3 brings in John Constantine played perfectly by Matt Ryan. Constantine is an accomplished magic user, though he also tends to have bad luck. Still, with a Time Demon as the “big bad” of the season, it makes perfect sense for Constantine to make an appearance. Constantine explains that the six stones can be used to defeat the demon, but he warns Sara about using the death totem herself. Sara ignores this advice, not because she’s stubborn, but she’s essentially fooled into using the Totem and then trapped. However, she manages to master it eventually, enough to use it against the demon when the time comes.

The Totems and Mallus are also tied in with Amalya’s history, including the destruction of her village, and the future history of her Totem (her village must be destroyed for the Totem to find its way to her granddaughter, Mari, who becomes the Detroit superheroine, Vixen.) Amalya, Nate, and the Legends, including Rip Hunter, despite their best efforts end-up breaking time in Zambesi, and Rip sacrifices himself so the Waverider can escape.

Sara takes the Waverider to Salvation in the Old West. The Legends meet up with Jonah Hex, but the town which is supposed to be a time travel blind spot – isn’t. Julius Ceasar and his Roman Legion, Leif Erickson’s sister and an attack phalanx of Vikings, and Blackbeard and his pirates, and of course – Mallus attack the town. But Amalya has figured out why simply attacking Mallus with the Totems didn’t work. The Totems must be used together. “Oh, like Voltron,” remarks Nate. The first attempt fails but in the second attempt the six Totem Bearers call forth beams of pure light which form a construct of good. Yes, these different colored beams of light that represent the elemental forces of the Totems do bring to mind Voltron – and the “being of pure good”? It’s Beebo! Beebo is a talking, fuzzy toy that a younger Martin Stein had bought for his daughter’s Hannukah present before he was accidentally sent through time to Vinland – the Viking colony in North America. The anachronism has the Vikings conquering North America instead of returning to Greenland, and worshiping the talking Beebo toy instead of becoming Christians. Anyway, the Beebo construct created by the Legends is a giant size version of Beebo – and it does manage to defeat Mallus and even kills the demon.

Legends of Tomorrow is a fun show. Whereas the other CW DC shows have gotten darker over the years (but are still good), Legends remains light. The show is also focused on character. This season Martin Stein dies during “Crisis on Earth X”, and Jax loses his firestorm powers and leaves the crew. Rip Hunter sacrifices himself to simply give the Legends time to escape – though I’m hoping he will return, or that Arthur Darvill will play another character on the series (Booster Gold, anyone? I’d love to see that.) The finale of Season 3 is wild: pirates, Roman soldiers, and Vikings attacking a Wild West town. Ava, the director of the Time Bureau, also introduces characters from the future – descendants of our characters or characters from episodes of this season (such as Helen of Troy, whom Zari drops on Themyscira rather than returning her to the Trojan War). But it’s the Voltron-style Beebo that just makes that final episode hilarious and perfect. I am still really enjoying this show and I highly recommend it.

Read my Review of Season 2 of Legends of Tomorrow.

Read my Review of Season 1 of Legends of Tomorrow.

UPDATE: I recently purchased and re-watched Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow, and I really enjoyed it. The Blu-Ray version is three Blu-Ray discs and includes the entire “Crisis on Earth-X” crossover, with the special “Crisis on Earth-X” titles.

Read my Review of Crisis on Earth-X.

Legends of Tomorrow Season 2 Review

  • Series Title: Legends of Tomorrow
  • Season: Season 2
  • Episodes: 17
  • Discs: 4
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Caity Lotz, Brandon Routh, Arthur Darvill, Franz Drameh, Victor Garber, Maise Richardson-Sellers, Dominic Purcell, Nick Zano, Matt Letscher, John Barrowman, Neal McDonough
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

This review contains spoilers for the second season of Legends of Tomorrow.

Season 2 of Legends of Tomorrow starts off very much as an anthology series – Rip Hunter is missing, and the remaining Legends are travelling through history to fix “aberrations” or changes in the established timeline of history. The first nine episodes have the Legends in a variety of places: World War II, where they meet the JSA (Justice Society of America), including Amaya Jiwe (Vixen) who joins the Legends. Also introduced in the season premiere is Dr. Nate Heywood (Citizen Steel). The Legends also end up fighting zombies in the civil war; they travel to 17th century Japan meeting Katana’s great-great-great etc grandfather, and they go to the Old West where they meet Jonah Hex again. These episodic stories are fun, and also allow the characters, especially the new ones to grow and the team to gel. Sara Lance (White Canary) is appointed leader and captain in the wake of Rip’s disappearance.

Eobard Thawne, from the first season of The Flash is one of three main villains, however, the Legends don’t know that is who they are facing. Firestorm finds a secret message from a future Barry Allen warning of an evil speedster – which they don’t immediately share with the team. Damien Darhk, from Season 4 of Arrow is another villain. Sara meets Darhk in the season premiere and intends to kill him, but her team prevents her, since killing Darhk in the 1940s would change everyone’s history. The third partner in the trinity of sin is Malcolm Merlyn (from Arrow from the beginning). Thawne, Merlyn, and Darhk make for great villains. Audiences who have watched the CW-verse (or Arrowverse) from the beginning are familiar with their stories and their endings. Many of our characters, especially Sara, have personal conflicts with the villains. And by introducing them more gradually, as well as their goals, the series flows better than last season where the main villain (Vandal Savage) just did not work. Also, each episode begins with a spoken intro that explains the premise of the show, however, Legends of Tomorrow keeps this from being boring by having each character repeat the info in their own style, and in episode 10, “The Legion of Doom”, it’s one of the “villains” from the Legion who put their own spin on the by then familiar introduction. Note that officially, the villains are “The Legion of Doom”, despite Sara saying, “Yeah, we’re not calling them that”. Nate had come up with the moniker, after a “Hanna-Barbara cartoon I watched as a kid”.

After “Invasion” the 4-part crossover featuring all four CW DC shows, the conflict between the Legion and the Legends heats up. In “Raiders of the Lost Art”, the Legends meet George Lucas while he is a film student, and have to convince him not to quit film school. The episode is filled with Star Wars references and a great deal of fun. They find Rip as well, who has completely forgotten who he is, his mind being scrambled by contact with the Waverider time drive. Rip thinks he is a film student, working on a student film of his script, “Legends”. Not only does “Legends” feature versions of all the Legends, but Rip is frustrated by a really bad actor playing the Vandal Savage character, and the script introduces the plot for the rest of the season, the search for the legendary “Spear of Destiny”, which has been broken in to multiple pieces. Rip calls this the McGuffin of his script. This is the type of self-referential humor that Legends manages to do really well. It also helps that the villains and the season-long plot are introduced slowly.

The second half of the season has the Legion of Doom (Merlyn, Darhk, and Thawne) and the Legends all looking for the Spear of Destiny. The Legion also messes with time to try to trap the Legends – and the Legends have to put it back. Rip, meanwhile, is captured by the Legion at the end of “Raiders of the Lost Art”, and tortured for information. However, the Legion discovers that Rip can’t tell them anything because his personality has been overwritten. However, one of the Legion pulls an artificial tooth from Rip’s mouth that hides a bank acct number, the Legion goes to the bank, first intending to rob it, then having Rip simply ask for his vault to be opened, only to discover Rip doesn’t know his passphrase. The dynamics between the Legion are great. Once they get the future tech that would restore Rip’s mind and personality, Malcolm alters it to make Rip a mindless tool of the Legion. Although the audience won’t know it until later – this is also when Captain Cold is pulled out of time from before he dies and recruited by the Legion.

With Rip on the Legion’s side, the Legends are in trouble. The Legends also discover that the Spear was broken into pieces, and each piece was given to a member of the JSA to guard. The JSA was then scattered throughout history. So, we now have a quest to get back the spear. The Legion strikes first, killing Dr. Mid-Nite in the future and taking his piece. The Legend gets Rip’s piece of the Spear from 60s Los Angeles, saves George Lucas, but as mentioned previously, fails to save Rip Hunter. Another piece of the Spear is found in Camelot, guarded by Stargirl, whom the locals know as Merlin, and whom has created the Round Table. Commander Steel, Dr. Heywood’s grandfather, and member of the JSA, worked for NASA, and hid his piece on the moon. But with all their successes, and even assembling the Spear themselves, the Legends decide they must destroy it – the Spear is too powerful an object for anyone to wield. They head to the Battle of the Somme in World War I, to meet JRR Tolkien, who had written an unpublished paper about the final resting place of Sir Gaiwan, said to be the hiding place of a vial of the Precious Blood of Christ – the only substance that can destroy the Spear. The adventure with Tolkien is also great, with multiple Lord of the Rings references, and includes a quote of the “Men of the West” Speech from the film Return of the King. But for all their efforts, the Legends fail and the Legion of Doom gets the Spear.

The penultimate episode, “Doomworld”, has a world re-created by Merlyn, Thawne, and Darhk. However, they have also messed with the Legends – making them into their worst and most unlucky selves. Dr. Heywood, however, figures out something is wrong. He meets Ray who has created a device to restore the Legends memories. This works OK, until Jax tries to restore Professor Stein – who resists and breaks the device. There’s a massive fight, but in the end, Thawne gets the Spear and drops it into an very hot reactor to destroy it (not unlike the destruction of the One Ring by volcano in Lord of the Rings). The Legends decide they must go back in time and prevent the Legion from getting the Spear in the first place. In the end, it’s Sara, who all along had been the strongest voice to say they mustn’t use the Spear, who uses it to defeat the Legion. Yet, when the team arrives in Los Angeles – time doesn’t seem quite right.

Legends of Tomorrow is quite fun and the second season was an improvement on the first. Sara shines as captain, able to make tough decisions, wrangle her crew, but also able to learn from her own mistakes, and even to develop compassion. These characters are still screw-ups, which is a great way to do superheroes – as perfect characters are boring. The crew this time around: Sara, Professor Stein, Jax, Dr. Ray Palmer, Mick Rory, Dr. Heywood (Steel), and Amaya (Vixen) work better than last year’s line up.  I missed Rip in the early part of the season, and for much of the second part of the season he’s working with the villains, but overall he’s there enough – and Sara actually made for a better captain with a better leadership style. Dr. Heywood fits in to the Legends immediately, and Amaya also is not as awkward a character as Hawkgirl from last season. And Vixen’s power, the ability to channel the power of any animal, is very cool and realized beautifully. Overall, Legends of Tomorrow was my personal favorite of the CW shows last season.

You can also read my Season 1 Review of Legends of Tomorrow.

Legends of Tomorrow Season 1 Review (spoilers)

  • Series Title:  Legends of Tomorrow
  • Season: 1
  • Episodes: 16
  • Discs: 4
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Arthur Darvill, Brandon Routh, Victor Garber, Franz Drameh, Caity Lotz, Dominic Purcell, Wentworth Miller, Ciara Renée

Legends of Tomorrow is a team-up show that was spun-off mid-season from The Flash and Arrow. It features Brandon Routh as Dr. Ray Palmer (The Atom) and Sara Lance (White Canary) from Arrow, Dr. Martin Stein and Jefferson “Jax” Jackson (Firestorm) from The Flash, and also from The Flash Leonard Snart (Captain Cold) and Mick Rory (Heatwave). New to this series are time traveller, Rip Hunter, and Kendra Saunders (Hawkgirl). Hunter brings his time-ship, the Waverider and it’s A.I. computer, Gideon.

What makes Legends of Tomorrow different and interesting isn’t simply the characters – it’s that these characters are the “screw-ups”. They not only make mistakes – they frequently make things worse. Rip Hunter’s mission is to track down and kill Vandal Savage an immortal dictator from the future that killed his wife and child (and billions more people). Yet Rip is also on the run – because his mission isn’t sanctioned by the Time Masters he once served – they are actually after him for breaking the rules. Halfway through the season we discover the soldier, Chronos, who was chasing our characters through time is actually Mick Rory – who was captured by the Time Masters and brainwashed into being their killing machine. This means that when, during the first time you watch this series and you assume Chronos is tracking the Waverider using future technology – he’s actually able to track Rip and company because he remembers where they will be. This means the second time you watch this show, there’s an extra layer of meaning to what’s going on.

The first six or so episodes of this series are very episodic – Rip and his crew travel to different eras of time, trying to track down and eliminate Savage. Yet again – their plans seem doomed. Savage also has an intimate connection to Kendra (Hawkgirl) and Carter Hall (Hawkman). However, gradually the story becomes more connected and each episode ends with a “cliffhanger” that leads into the next episode – and this is where the show really picked up steam. The last four episodes are essentially one grand story – with revelations about the Time Masters – who, after all, are still using Rip Hunter.

The weakest part of season 1 of Legends of Tomorrow is Vandal Savage, and not simply because a immortal villain is a boring villain (after all how do you kill an immortal villain?) but because I just didn’t like how he was played. However, I liked the finale very much.

The best part of Legends of Tomorrow is the characters and the cast. Watching Arthur Darvill playing a time traveler again is a pure joy. The rest of the cast does an excellent job – and the writing takes the time to explore each of the characters – their backgrounds, their fears, and how they can become heroes despite their faults and doubts. So this is a show about very human “superheroes”. Watching Leonard Snart develop is especially a joy. The show is also well-written, and isn’t afraid to get into the occasional moral quandary about what they are doing. I recommend it highly.