The Sting

  • Title:  The Sting
  • Director:  George Roy Hill
  • Date:  1973
  • Studio:  Universal
  • Genre:  Drama
  • Cast:  Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw, Charles Durning, Ray Walston, Eileen Brennan, Harold Gould, Dana Elcar
  • Format:  Widescreen, color
  • DVD Format:  R1, NTSC

“I’ll get him anyway.”  — Johnny Hooker
“Why?”  — Henry Gondorff
” ‘Cause I don’t know enough about killing to kill him.”  — Johnny

“What was I supposed to do?  Call him for cheating better than me in front of the others?”  — Doyle

The Sting is the original caper film.  Without The Sting, there is no Ocean’s 11 or it’s sequels either the original or the new ones, and there’s no White Collar, Leverage, or Hustle either.  But it’s a classic that stands on its own two feet as well, not simply as the film that establishes a sub-genre all by itself.  The film begins with Luther and Johnny, two con artists, working street cons.  As the film opens in Joliet, Illinois in 1936, the two con artists pull a switch, but unknown to them they’ve picked the wrong victim – a numbers runner for the Chicago Irish mob.  Initially, they are thrilled to pull a $11,000 con… but then one of the con artists, Luther, is killed, and Johnny knows that if he gets caught, the mob will kill him too.

Johnny travels up to Chicago and meets Henry Gondorff an old friend of Luther’s.  Gondoroff gathers a group of con artists together and they decide to pull a con on the mobster they blame for Luther’s death. Luther’s so well-known in the con artist underground that everyone wants to help to stick it to his killer where it hurts — in the wallet.

The film is set-up in sections:  The Set-Up, The Hook, The Tale, The Wire, The Shut Out, and The Sting — each with a beautifully designed title card.  And each section of the film is exactly what it says, as the con artists rope in and set-up their victim.  However, what makes The Sting a great and memorable film is the surprise ending… which I’m not going to spoil here.  If you’ve seen the film, you know exactly what I’m talking about — and if you haven’t, it’s just not fair to spoil the surprise ending.  There are hints throughout the film, but it does come as a surprise the first time you see it and it really makes the movie.

This film also features a great partnership between the older, nearly washed-up con artist (Paul Newman) master of  the Big Con, and his new, young, apprentice (Robert Redford).  A number of  excellent character actors round out the cast.  Also, the film is set in the 1930s, which means great suits and hats but on the negative side — some very rough, inappropriate language.

Overall, a great film, especially if you are a fan of the caper film as a genre.  I recommend it.

Recommendation:  See it!
Rating:  4 out of 5 Stars
Next Film:  The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle