Death in Paradise Season 3 Review

  • Series Title: Death in Paradise
  • Season: 3
  • Episodes: 8
  • Discs: 2
  • Network: BBC
  • Cast: Kris Marshall, Danny John-Jules, Gary Carr, Sara Martins, Don Warrington
  • DVD: Widescreen DVD (R1, NTSC)

This review includes spoilers for Season 3 of Death in Paradise.

Death in Paradise Season 3 opens with quite a surprise. DI Richard Poole returns to Saint Marie from a trip to the UK, only to be murdered during a reunion with friends from his university days. DI Humphrey Goodman is sent to replace Poole and solve his murder. Initially, Camille, Dwayne, and Fidel have no idea what to make of Humphrey – he’s clumsy, disheveled, and disorganized, far different from the straight-laced DI Poole. But Humphrey wins them over by solving the murder of their former DI.

Over the season, I found that I really liked DI Goodman, though it takes a few episodes to get used to his style. Unlike Poole, Humphrey throws himself into island life – trying the local food and drink, spending time off the clock with his colleagues at Camille’s mother’s bar,  wearing more appropriate clothing for the warm weather. He was also married, though in the episode where Humphrey is introduced his wife leaves him a message on his answering machine that she isn’t coming to Saint Maire and she wants a divorce. When she shows up at the end of the season, to ask Humphrey if he wants to “make another go of it”, it’s Humphrey who realises he’s grown over the last year, yet despite her complaints of their marriage being stagnant it’s Sally who hasn’t grown and isn’t willing to try change and new things.

Death in Paradise is also a cozy-style mystery program, as such the detective solves murders by figuring things out in a light bulb moment. DI Goodman still does this, but we some attempt by the team to use forensics, and to interview witnesses. Yet the cases always end with Humphrey having that “I’ve got it!” moment, gathering all the suspects together, and exposing the murderer. Still, I found I enjoyed Season 3 and that after a few episodes, I really liked DI Humphrey Goodman. In many ways, he’s more sympathetic than Poole, at the very least Humphrey tries to fit in with the local culture and his colleagues without giving up who he is. This series is recommended, especially for viewers who enjoy cozy-style mysteries.

Read my Review of Death in Paradise Season 1.

Read my Review of Death in Paradise Season 2.

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Death in Paradise Season 2 Review

  • Series Title: Death in Paradise
  • Season: 2
  • Episodes: 8
  • Discs: 2
  • Network: BBC
  • Cast: Ben Miller, Danny John-Jules, Gary Carr, Sara Martins, Don Warrington
  • DVD: Widescreen DVD (R1, NTSC)

The second season of Death in Paradise is better than the first. The crimes are darker and more complex, and there’s more character development. New father, Fidel, is studying for his sergeant’s exam, which he passes in the final episode of the season. DI Richard Poole and Camille start to have feelings for each other but they ignore them. “Saint Maire” is beautiful as always. The cases involve both residents of the island and tourists.

However, this is still a lightweight series, and almost in the “cozy” style than a procedural. Poole, Camille, and Fidel and Dwayne solve cases by finding the one detail that doesn’t fit. It makes for a diverting hour of television – but it’s not earth-shattering, and the series could do better. In the last episode, Poole is sent back to the UK escorting a prisoner. Camille, Fidel, and Dwayne worry he won’t return to Saint Maire, but of course, he does. And again, the cases are interesting, but at times they are flat.

I do like the cast and characters though, and it’s nice to have a British series with people of color in starring roles who aren’t stereotypes. And the Island itself (actually Guadalupe in the French Carribean) is beautiful. I just wanted a bit more to this series. Still, recommended when you’re in the mood for something light and diverting.

Read my Review of Death in Paradise Season 1.

Death in Paradise Season 1 Review

  • Series Title: Death in Paradise
  • Season: 1
  • Episodes: 8
  • Discs: 2
  • Network: BBC
  • Cast: Ben Miller, Danny John-Jules, Gary Carr, Sara Martins, Don Warrington
  • DVD: Widescreen DVD (R1, NTSC)

Spoilers for the first season of Death in Paradise

When the British DI in charge of the Honoré Police Station is murdered, uptight British DI Richard Poole is sent from London to Saint Maire a formerly French Carribean island to investigate. Poole doesn’t like the sun, sand, surf, or food. But he’s also a brilliant detective who is excellent at finding the one clue that will help solve the case. In the first episode, a locked room mystery where a man is murdered inside a locked panic room, Poole proves the man was alive when the door was opened and he was killed by a corrupt police officer. This leads to Poole being invited to stay. Also, one of his suspects turns out to be an undercover policewoman, who is then permanently assigned to Honoré Police Station. Two long-time Honoré police officers round out the cast: Officer Dwayne Myers and Officer Fidel Best. The police commissioner from Guadalupe also makes regular appearances.

Every episode of Death in Paradise includes a seemingly impossible murder, yet Poole and in the later episodes the rest of the Honoré police department are able to solve them. Poole, an obsessive man, often notices tiny details about a crime scene, the victim, or a situation in the crime that doesn’t make sense. At first, his fellow police officers are inclined to disregard this “one little piece” that doesn’t fit. But as Poole solves case after case based on the small detail, the other officers start to realize it can be important. Watching Fidel, Dwayne, and Camille grow is fun, though I felt there could have been more character development. Poole also slowly starts to adapt to the Island lifestyle, though by the last episode in the season he is still wearing his expensive and totally inappropriate London suits and complaining about the heat.

The scenery in Death in Paradise is beautiful. Saint Marie is a fictional island, but the show is filmed in Guadalupe in the French Carribean. The sunsets, beaches, water, etc, are beautiful. I liked Death in Paradise but I didn’t love it. The cases didn’t feel complex enough, and Poole’s methods of solving cases had more in common with Columbo than a typical British procedural. On the other hand, Poole is played by Ben Miller of Primeval and Officer Dwayne Myers is played by Danny John-Jules (Cat) of Red Dwarf and it’s great fun to see them both again. Also, it’s impressive to see a British show where the regular cast is mostly people of color. Poole also stands out like a sore thumb and is very much a fish out of water. In my opinion, more could have been done with that, but I’ll take what I can get. Overall, Death in Paradise is a lightweight mystery, enjoyable, but not Earth-shattering.