The Flash Season 3 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 3
  • Episodes: 23
  • Discs: 6
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Keiynan Lonsdale, Tom Felton
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

The third season of The Flash begins with Flashpoint, after his father is killed, Barry Allen travels back in time and saves his mother. He has three wonderful months with both his parents being alive, but eventually things don’t go so well, and Barry decides he’s made a mistake, so he has to reverse it. He releases the Reverse Flash whom he’s kept hostage and allows the death of his mother to happen. But when he returns to the new present things are different. Iris isn’t talking to her father, Joe. Cisco is extremely angry at Barry and grieving. Caitlin, unknown to the others at first, is developing cold powers and fears becoming Killer Frost. And at the Central City Police Department, Barry is now working under a new head of the CSI department, Julian Albert, a man that doesn’t like or get along with him.

At first, Barry is at a loss. But within an episode or two, Barry gets the team back together, and although things are not perfect, they are at least working together. It takes Cisco a little longer to come around (he lost his brother, Dante, as a result of Flashpoint), but he works with Team Flash anyway. Flashpoint has another effect – new metas are appearing in Central City, and the police forensic department is finding husks that are somehow linked to these new metas and a villain called “Alchemy”. Barry suddenly realizes that the new metas had existed in Flashpoint.

There’s more investigation, and it becomes apparent that Julian is Alchemy but he’s merely a harbinger and servant to Savitar – the God of Speed. Julian had become obsessed with an artifact known as The Philosopher’s Stone, but when he found it on a dig in India, his entire archaeological team died, and unknown to Julian, he became Alchemy. Julian is brought in to Team Flash and the fight against Savitar. Meanwhile, Caitlin’s cold powers become more obvious. At first, she takes a pair of meta-power damping bracelets to suppress her powers. Later, Cisco makes her a necklace. Wally also becomes Kid Flash – as he was in Flashpoint.

But once the Alchemy plot is resolved, and the fallout from Flashpoint largely settled, the main focus of the season becomes clear: Savitar. In an attempt to destroy The Philosopher’s Stone, Barry is thrust into the future and he sees Savitar murder Iris. Saving Iris becomes the focus of the rest of the season. Team Flash tries to change the future, by changing the other headlines Barry saw on a TV news broadcast when he traveled to the future. There are villains of the week to defeat, but the majority of the plot is devoted to preventing Iris’s death, and figuring out who or what Savitar is and how to stop him. Barry even travels to the future again, and discovers just how messed-up everyone is without Iris – and how broken, he, Barry, is. By the end of the season, it becomes clear who Savitar is: he’s a time remnant of Barry Allen – and essentially a time paradox.

The last two episodes of the season play like one big 2-hour finale, even though there is no “to be continued” title card at the penultimate episode. In the second-to-last episode, we see the events from a few months before – and Savitar kills Iris despite Team Flash finding a physicist, Tracy Brand to build a speed cannon to defeat him. But, it turns out to not be Iris but rather HR Wells, using a projector to hide his appearance and take Iris’s place. Tracy, who was starting to fall in love with HR was devastated. But now that Iris is alive, it changes things – and essentially Team Flash is waiting for the Time Paradox to catch up and for Savitar to disappear from reality. Savitar tries to save himself at the last minute – but Barry shows him mercy and even invites this other scarred Barry on to Team Flash.

This doesn’t go well, and Savitar kidnaps Cisco. But Cisco gets through to “Killer” Frost. At first, it looks like Caitlin will still choose Savitar, but in the end she doesn’t. Julian develops a cure for her, but she also chooses to return it to him, deciding to keep her frosty personality, but maybe without the “Killer” part. Barry has a final fight with Savitar, defeats him, turns away and is nearly killed – until Iris saves Barry by killing Future Evil (Savitar) Barry.

You’d think all would be well, but as Barry and Iris start to discuss wedding plans – a speed force storm erupts and threatens the entire city. Barry voluntarily goes into the Speed Force to fill the prison that Savitar left empty.

Season three of The Flash had it’s ups and downs. Although having Yet Another Evil Speedster seems like a bad idea – I had less of a problem with that than the main plot point being the threat to Iris’s life. The majority of the season seems to rest on the idea that no matter what Team Flash does – they can’t change things enough to save Iris – and the future is fixed. But, we know, Iris is a main character – and she’s not likely to really “die”. Throughout the history of DC Comics – Iris West is Barry Allen’s wife, not his girlfriend – and whether she is “Iris Allen” or “Iris West-Allen” she is his wife. So, despite this “big threat” that she will die – it’s an empty one, we know that she won’t. It is possible to make something interesting to see how she will survive, and HR’s sacrifice to save her is actually a surprise – but that she survives isn’t really a surprise.

That Savitar turns out to be Barry almost doesn’t work – it explains how Savitar knows everything Team Flash will do – he simply remembers what happened. But it’s actually “Killer” Frost who gives the game away – when she says everything Barry will say, as he says it, she’s actually giving Barry a big hint as to who Savitar is. Plus the Savitar-is-Barry plot actually mirrors the Wells/Thawne/Reverse Flash plot from season 1 – but this time in a sense we see the time travel paradox from Barry’s point-of-view, and Savitar is Barry as Reverse Flash, which in some ways works but in a lot of ways does not fit Barry’s character. Barry, despite his dark past, is one of the happiest characters in DC Comics. And, although it makes sense that in a fit of despair, after the loss of his father, he would go back in time and create Flashpoint, it doesn’t follow that he would then become Savitar, especially as Savitar originally exists in the Flashpoint Universe – which is the one where Barry’s parents are both alive and Barry doesn’t have super speed.

However, despite that, and season 3 of The Flash being darker than previous seasons, I still enjoyed it. Watching the development of Iris and Barry’s relationship is joyful. Wally West, especially once he becomes Kid Flash is awesome. I like Julian and HR as members of Team Flash. Caitlin’s story was well told – and I liked, a lot, that she was given agency throughout her story. She was able to choose if she’d be “Killer” Frost (though it’s Julian who causes the manifestation of her powers), and, more importantly, it’s Caitlin who decides not to take the experimental “cure” to remove her powers. It would have been so easy for someone to simply shoot the cure into her – but The Flash didn’t go that route. I also really liked Tracy Brand as a character, and I hope we see more of her in Season 4, but I doubt we will.

Follow this link to read My Review of Season 1 of The Flash.

Follow this link to read My Review of Season 2 of The Flash.

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The Flash Season 2 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 2
  • Episodes: 24
  • Discs: 6
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Keiynan Lonsdale
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen 

The Flash continues to be a highly enjoyable series. Season 2 brings in Earth-2 from the very beginning. Jay Garrick’s, who’s Golden-Age helmet had come through the time portal at the end of last season arrives in person, to warn Barry Allen and the others about Zoom – an evil speedster from Earth-2, who having conquered that world, and has plans to do the same to Barry’s Earth. Not to mention Zoom wants to steal Barry’s speed so he can go even faster.

Barry, Cisco, and Dr. Wells (from Earth-2) do eventually travel to Earth-2 – to save Dr. Wells’ daughter, Jesse, who has been kidnapped. The two-part Earth-2 episode is marvelous. Everything has a golden look, and the architecture and even set design has a marvelous Art Deco quality. While on Earth-2, Barry meets his doppleganger, also a forensic scientist for the police, but one with no powers who is married to Iris West – a police detective. That version of Barry does not get on at all with Iris’s father, Joe, a jazz singer. And that Barry’s mother, Nora, is still alive. Our Barry is brought to tears when he hears an answering machine message from his mother. But Cisco’s doppleganger is the evil meta – Reverb. And Caitlin also has an evil meta doppleganger – Killer Frost. the entire two-part episode is extremely well done and well constructed. It looks beautiful, and the characterization is wonderful.

That isn’t the only two-parter. This box set, unlike last year, includes both parts of the “Legends of Today”/”Legends of Tomorrow” crossover which has Team Flash working with Team Arrow, and introduces Hawkgirl (Kendra) and Hawkman, as well as the villain – Vandal Savage. It’s a backdoor pilot for Legends of Tomorrow but it works. I’ve already reviewed Legends of Tomorrow, so I won’t repeat myself here, but suffice it to say the two-part story was fantastic – and had some impressive special effects. It also shows just how dangerous Barry’s time travelling can be – something which the series will come back to later.

Season two of The Flash, alters between Barry and Team Flash tracking down and defeating meta-humans, often sent from Earth-2 by Zoom, and increasingly complicated personal relationships. And it’s the nitty-gritty of how these characters care about each other that makes the show really work. Barry and Iris also grow much closer together. Caitlin also grows close to Jay Garrick, even creating Volocity 9 a speed drug to help cure him of his illness and get his speed back. But this Jay has a dark secret, and it’s revelation is devastating to Caitlin. Meanwhile, Cisco discovers he is also a metahuman, with the ability to see visions of the present, past, and even sometimes – the future, if events involve a metahuman – he takes the name, Vibe. Cisco’s fear of his own power and eventual acceptance of it becomes another them of the season.

Once it’s revealed who Zoom really is, the season focuses on him, and his need to take Barry’s speed. When he kidnaps Wally West, Joe’s long-lost son, Barry chooses to give up his speed to Zoom to save Wally. This gives Barry a few episodes as a normal guy. Wells then says he can re-create the experiment that made Barry a speedster – but when he does, Barry disappears utterly. Wally and Jesse are both knocked out by the backlash of the experiment as well. But Barry isn’t dead – he’s in a Speed Force limbo – where he talks to everyone important to him – then returns, with his speed.

The final confrontation between Barry and Zoom is – wow – very much a lot to take in. I covered it in a review of The Flash season finale. Overall, Season 2 of The Flash was excellent, even better than Season 1 of the Flash, which I enjoyed very much. I highly recommend this show, which is still appropriate for all ages. It’s very much a must see show.

The Flash (2014) Season 1 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 1
  • Episodes: 23
  • Discs: 5
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Rick Cosnett, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen 

Of the three DC Comics television shows from last year, The Flash is the lightest, the most accessible, and the one I’d recommend to start younger children (10 and up) on the live action DC Universe besides the wonderful DC Animated Universe. Which is most definitely not to say this is a show only for children. But whereas Gotham is extremely dark, and Arrow was also dark last season, The Flash is bright and fun, as it should be, if you know the comics, both the Silver Age Flash and the Modern Flash, Wally West. Grant Gustin is a breath of fresh air as Barry Allen – he’s bright, talented, but also warm, caring, full of heart, and brings his bright light to everything in the show, despite the character’s somewhat dark back story. As always, Barry is a police forensic scientist, in this version, Barry usually introduces himself as “a CSI for the Central City PD”. This isn’t a tie-in to the popular CSI franchise, but rather Barry describing his job in a way the people he meets will understand. When Barry was 11, his mother, Nora, was murdered, his father was accused, tried, and put in prison for life for the murder, and Barry became the foster son of Joe West, a Central City police officer. Joe and Barry developed a strong father-son bond, though Barry also still cares very much for his imprisoned father, Henry (John Wesley Shipp). This tragedy drives Barry to be the best CSI he can be. Then he’s struck by lighting during the particle accelerator accident, and when he wakes he has super speed. Thus, as the Flash, Barry is also driven to help others and solve crimes.

But the particle accelerator accident didn’t simply make Barry the Flash – it also transformed some others into “meta humans”, people with powers. Although some meta humans, like Barry are good, many use their new powers for criminal activities. So Barry, and his friends at S.T.A.R. Labs, Caitlyn, Cisco, and Dr. Wells, find, fight, and contain these new super villains.

The first season of The Flash, successfully weaves together Barry’s life: his job as a forensic scientist, his quest to help others as the Flash, his work with S.T.A.R. Labs to find and stop meta humans, his relationship with his friends and family and how becoming the Flash does and doesn’t change things, and an arc-plot that’s so well-written you don’t really know where it’s going. Even if you’ve read The Flashpoint Paradox graphic novel or seen the Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox animated film based on the graphic novel, it’s still a question exactly how this particular version of the Flash will do the story. Because in anything based on at least DC Comics, each version of something will be slightly different – almost alternate universes. I enjoyed the development of the arc-plot.

The performances by the guest stars playing meta humans and other villains, including one guest appearance by Mark Hamill as the Trickster are excellent. Amanda Pays also appears twice, again playing Dr. Tina McGee, now of Mercury Labs. There are other numerous characters who appear: Captain Cold, Weather Wizard, Golden Glider, Mist, Heat Wave, Grood, etc – and all of them work, even Grood manages to not be completely silly. CW also brings characters from Arrow to The Flash for visits (and vice versa) and did a crossover episode (unfortunately the Arrow half is not included on the DVD set – to see it you also need to buy Arrow Season 3, which I recommend). I like, very much, that Warner Brothers is slowly but surely building up DC on our television screens – this year adds Legends of Tomorrow on CW as a mid-season show, and Supergirl on CBS at the end of October. There were also rumors last year that TNT would be doing a live action Teen Titans (possibly called Titans), but it seems to be stalled. I’d check at mid-season for an update. (By the way, feel free to follow me on Twitter @JackieOMoleski for updates, I retweet and post links to info about nearly anything DC Comics film and television related that I happen to find.) But that CW/Warners is smart enough to not keep The Flash isolated, but integrate it into a larger whole not only makes the series itself seem bigger – but it feels more like the comics, where there were references to other DC cities, locations, and characters frequently – and they had “team-up” issues, and all the DC superheroes were part of the Justice League and worked together there as well as the most popular characters having their own books.

Again, The Flash is an excellent series. I enjoyed year one very much, and I’m looking forward to year two. I highly recommend this show. I also recommend it for younger fans, ages 10 and up. The Flash is much lighter than Arrow, and much, much lighter than Gotham.