Crisis on Earth-X Review

  • Series: The Flash, Arrow, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow
  • Third Arrowverse Crossover Special: Crisis on Earth-X
  • Episodes: 4
  • Discs: 1
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Stephen Amell, Melissa Benoist, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Emily Bett Rickards, Victor Garber, Caity Lotz, Chyler Leigh, Franz Drameh, Paul Blackthorne, Jeremy Jordan, Wentworth Miller, Russell Tovey
  • Network: CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

Barry and Supergirl arrive, and a few moments later Green Arrow pulls up on a motorcycle, “Just a quick reminder, super speed – I don’t have it.” – Oliver Queen, the Green Arrow

“My grandparents didn’t survive the Holocaust so the world could be ruled by Nazis. So if you want Kara, you gotta’ go through me and even if you do, you’re not going to win. Because we will not back down, we will keep fighting. So get the hell off our Earth while you still can.” – Felicity.

Just like DC Comics occasionally does crossovers between two or more books, and all their characters live in the same “universe”, from the very beginning all the “Arrowverse” shows have been clearly in the same universe, and even though Kara Danvers (Supergirl) is on another Earth, she has met Barry Allen (the Flash) and company before, and the characters from Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow in the previous crossover, “Invasion”. “Crisis on Earth-X” starts innocently enough, with all our characters gathered together for Barry and Iris’s wedding. But just as their minister gets to the part about, “Does anyone object to the marriage of this couple?” Nazis burst in and a huge fight erupts. All of our heroes use their powers to fight off the Nazis, despite being dressed for a wedding. It’s total chaos.

Dr. Harry Wells explains that there is a 53rd Earth, beyond the known 52 Earths of the Multiverse. It’s a place so awful, it’s only known as Earth-X because no one would want to travel there. It’s the Earth where the Nazis won World War II. To make matters worse, in this version, Oliver’s doppelganger is the current führer of the Nazi-world and his wife is Overgirl, an evil Nazi version of Supergirl. First, evil Oliver and Evil Supergirl and their soldiers break into a lab and steal a prism, and then they come after Supergirl. Their plan? Well, Overgirl is dying after being exposed to too much sunlight so they’ve come to Earth One to kill Supergirl, take her heart, and implant it in Overgirl – because Supergirl would be the perfect donor. The Nazis manage to take over Star Labs and send half of our large group of Heroes to Earth-X and the rest are locked up in the pipeline. They miss Felicity and Iris though, who manage to be badass in trying to rescue everyone. Felicity and Iris also send a distress call to the Legends.

On Earth-X, Oliver, Barry, Alex Danvers, and company are locked in a cage with others in black and white striped convict clothes, with badges pinned to their chests. They meet Ray, and when Jax asks what he “did wrong” to be locked up, Ray responds, “I loved the wrong person”. Alex and Sara, who shared a one night stand the night before the ill-fated wedding, look knowingly at each other. The doppelganger of Captain Lance arrives and separates out our heroes and Ray, and leads them to a trench, they are told to stand on the edge, and a firing squad is readied. But at the last minute, Leonard Snart (“Leo”) arrives and rescues them all. They are taken to the base camp of the Freedom Fighters and meet General Winn Schott. The good – they are now in with a group that’s organized to fight and overthrow the Nazis. The bad? Their main plan is to destroy the Nazis’ new doomsday weapon, which happens to be housed with the interworld transport terminal that’s the only way for the Legends to get home. They also discover Ray is actually from Earth 1 and he and Leo are partners.

On Earth-X, the heroes need to convince Winn to give them a shot at getting to the portal before Winn uses a secret weapon of his own to blow it up. Meanwhile, on Earth One, Iris and Felicity are trying to get Cisco and anyone else locked in the Pipeline free, and stop Reverse Flash (who is in league with Evil Oliver and Overgirl) from killing Supergirl. They delay the operation that would kill Kara by turning off the power. When Felicity is caught, she tries to stand up to Thawne, but he threatens to kill her, and she gives up the encryption code for getting the power on. Thawne again ties Kara down under Red Light lamps to weaken her, but just as he’s about to cut her open, Ray, the Atom, stops him. The rest of the Legends – The Atom, Amaya, Zari, and Nate have arrived. They get everyone out of the Pipeline and rescue Kara. Everyone else returns from Earth-X, but Martin was shot during the mission to get to the inter-Earth Gateway. Martin Stein is dying, and because he is linked with Jefferson, he is dying also. Cisco, however, had designed, with help from Caitlin, a serum that would safely separate Martin and Jefferson but at the cost of the loss of their powers. Martin takes the serum as he lies dying in the Waverider’s med bay, to save Jefferson.

Even though everyone has returned to Earth One safely, except for Martin, and they’ve rescued Kara. Reverse-Flash is still determined to use their Nazi Waverider to launch an invasion of Earth One and Evil Oliver is still determined to kill Supergirl to save Overgirl. They also discover that not only will Overgirl’s overexposure to sunlight kill her, but she’s a living bomb who will explode with the power of a neutron bomb. Part four largely consists of major fight scenes, and a money shot of all the heroes, in costume, just all-out fighting back against a troop of black and red uniformed Nazis. Nazis who have just stormed a city block, randomly killing anyone they come across. Everyone has their part in the fight. Iris and our Wells are on the Waverider fighting the Nazi one but can’t get through their shields. Supergirl teases Overgirl out to fight, and Overgirl breaks through a window in her own ship, this allows Killer Frost, Amaya and Zari access into the ship to fight Nazis, take it over, and then lower the shields. Vibe arrives to transport them off just in time before the ship is destroyed by the Waverider’s missiles. Kara takes Overgirl Up, Up, and Away, so she can safely explode. Evil Oliver is devastated by the loss of his wife. Oliver kills his evil doppelganger.

Our heroes clean up against the Nazis and exile them back to Earth-X. Everyone attends Martin’s funeral, then one by one, or in small groups, they head back to their own homes. The Ray returns to Earth-X, but Snart decides to stay on Earth One for a short time. Barry brings Diggle to a lakeside park and he marries not only Iris and Barry but Felicity and Oliver.

On the one hand, “Crisis on Earth-X” has some very satisfying moments – superheroes and their human non-powered companions punching Nazis and being badass (especially Iris, Felicity, Alex, and Sara all get to have some great moments. When they finally arrive, Zari and Amaya aren’t left out of the girl power fun.) But the entire crossover is fight-heavy and at times plot light. There is some horrific imagery, but also moments of pure power and generosity such as our Oliver breaking his impersonation of his evil self to save the Earth-X Felicity and Felicity herself standing up to the Nazis that invade Star Labs. Evil Oliver though has an almost understandable goal – to save his wife, whom he clearly loves – Overgirl. Still, his plan, to kill Kara to save Overgirl is horrific. And one has to wonder how he knew to find Supergirl on Earth One since she normally lives on Earth 38. Also, once most of our characters are on Earth-X, their one mission is to return home. General Winn Schott is incredibly stubborn about wanting to destroy the inter-Earth portal before everyone can return home. And Flash and the Ray end up destroying his weapon, which turns out to be Red Tornado, so you have to wonder what that did to Schott’s resistance. But overall, considering the logistics of having so many characters, even in a four-hour special, and giving all of them screen time and stories, the crossover works. I also really, really liked The Ray (Russell Tovey of the original British Being Human) and cuddly Leonard Snart (Wentworth Miller).

Note: Over-exposure to sunlight giving Superman cancer, or at least a sort of cancer, is the plot of All-Star Superman.

Note 2: The first episode opens with a brief preview of Earth-X, which has red skies and yellow lightning, a reference perhaps to the future Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Note 3: Crisis on Earth-X, all four parts, is included in full on the Blu-Ray edition of Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow. The individual DVD box sets of Arrow (Season 6), Supergirl (Season 3), The Flash (Season 4), and Legends (Season 3), on the other hand, only include their individual episode of the crossover.

Supergirl Season 3 Review

  • Series Title: Supergirl
  • Season: Season 3
  • Episodes: 23
  • Discs: 5
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Melissa Benoist, Katie McGrath, Mehcad Brooks, Chyler Leigh, Jeremy Jordan, Chris Wood, David Harewood, Odette Annable, Carl Lumbly
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

This review contains spoilers for the third season of Supergirl.

The third season of Supergirl is focused on family, including the families the characters have built for themselves. Cat Grant is now gone (she’s the press secretary to the president, played by Linda Carter). Lina and Kara are friends, and when conservative jerk Morgan Edge threatens to purchase Catco in a hostile takeover to stop them from publishing the truth, Lina steps in and buys Catco instead. Lina initially tries to be hands-on with running Catco, but James Olsen the managing editor and Lina’s boyfriend convinces her to step back a bit. Edge at one point tries to get back at Lina by accusing her of poisoning the children of National City with lead. Supergirl proves that the children are sick because of chemicals in the city’s swimming pools – chemicals produced by Morgan’s company. There are mutual accusations of attempted murder as well, but Lina isn’t guilty and it’s implied neither is Morgan.

J’onn J’onzz receives a message from M’Gann to come to Mars. He goes with Supergirl and they find a White Martian resistance who have discovered J’onn’s father being held, prisoner. They release him and J’onn brings M’yrnn J’onzz back to Earth. M’yrnn initially stays at the DEO, and then in J’onn’s apartment. However, sadly, M’yrnn is suffering from a Martian form of Alzheimer’s Disease. There are a lot of ups and downs in J’onn and his father’s relationship. In the end, J’onn accepts his father is dying and prepares for “The Reach” a Martian mental passage where all of M’yrnn’s memories and experiences will be passed to his son.

Alex and Maggie Sawyer prepare for their wedding. Alex even finds Maggie’s family who abandoned her when they learned she was a lesbian. Maggie’s reunion with her father seems to go OK, but in the end, he rejects her again. Alex comes to realize that she really wants to be a mom, whereas Maggie doesn’t want children. The two reach an impasse and break up – and Maggie is never seen again. Alex is understandably hurt by this throughout the rest of the season. In the last few episodes of the season, she’s starting to research adopting a child.

Morgan Edge orders an attack at the unveiling of National City’s waterfront Supergirl statue and a young mother, who had bumped into Alex earlier, uses incredible strength to move a fallen metal pipe from her daughter. Alex, Lina, and eventually Kara become friends with Samantha and her daughter, Ruby. Sam works with Lina at L-Corp and is promoted to Chief Financial Officer after Lina buys Catco and steps back from the day to day running of L-Corp. Some weird things happen to Sam and Ruby. Slowly through the season, it becomes obvious that Sam’s blackouts and losses of time are related to the appearance of a new supervillain, Reign – the Kryptonian Worldkiller. Sam/Reign is an oddly sympathetic villain. Sam has no idea what her other half is doing. Sam’s a struggling single mother, trying to balance a demanding new job with raising her 12-year-old daughter. Sam and Ruby have a good relationship, but Ruby is a bit put out that her Mom doesn’t spend as much time with her as she used to. And Sam doesn’t know she is Reign – a supervillain capable of beating Supergirl badly and putting her in a coma.

I had a couple issues with the episode where Reign beats up Supergirl and puts her in a coma. First, I’m a little tired of the pattern – new villain beats up Supergirl, but by the end of the season, Supergirl will defeat the villain. Second, since Kara is in an honest-to-goodness coma and severely injured, Alex should have contacted Clark (Superman). Clark is her cousin, he has a right to know she’s been so seriously hurt. Alex also should have contacted Eliza, she also has a right to know what happened.

Kara is in a funk during the first half of the season because she had to send Mon-El away. Mon-El comes back from the future with a spaceship and his team-mates in the Legion of Superheroes, Brainiac 5 and his wife, Imra. Mon-El’s ship went through a wormhole and he had lived for seven years in the future. The Legion was sent back in time with multiple missions, some of which Mon-El doesn’t know about.

Once Mon-El, Brainiac 5, and Imra arrive, Supergirl and her team are able to learn more about Reign and the two other Worldkillers: Purity and Pestilence. The Legion really wants to destroy Pestilence because in their time she evolves into a being called Blight which is responsible for the destruction of whole planets and everything on them: people, animals, and plants. Lina also, as a friend of Sam’s, wants to help. Lina realizes that Sam is Reign, but that she has no knowledge of her other half. Lina even explains that Reign is over-writing Sam’s DNA, a process that if it continues will cause Sam to be Reign all the time, eventually killing her own personality. (We see this process happen quickly with Pestilence.) Lina keeps Sam in a secret lab at L-Corp and at first tries to figure out what is wrong with her and later tries to fix it. Lina also arranges for protective custody for Ruby while her mother is sick.

Despite Lina’s best efforts – she doesn’t tell Kara, Alex, or Supergirl what she is doing. When the DEO tracks Reign and finds out that Lina’s been trying to stop her – Supergirl especially is very upset, though Alex is also angry. Lina is invited to continue working at the DEO and Reign escapes. There is now considerable tension between Supergirl and Lina – though Lina is still friends with Kara. Yes, this seems to be setting up future conflict.

The story with Reign gets more and more complicated. At one point, Sam is locked in a dream state of a dark, dead valley on Krypton. Kara recognizes this valley. Reign decides to kill Ruby to assure her success – but a threat to her daughter is the one thing Sam can’t handle and it makes her own internal struggle stronger. Kara and company think they have killed Pestilence and Purity at one point, but the audience sees their spirits being absorbed by Reign. Lina realizes they need a special element to stop Reign, but there is no more of it on Earth. Supergirl and Mon-El travel to an “asteroid” to get some but it turns out to be Argo City. Kara meets her mother (now played by a different actress). After an argument with the council, Kara succeeds in getting some of this element. The DEO uses it to “defeat” Reign and Kara and Mon-El return to Argo City so Kara can spend time with her mother. However, Serena, a council member turns out to be the leader of a cult of three Kryptonian witches. They steal Mon-El’s ship and head to Earth to raise the Worldkillers and terraform Earth into New Krypton.

It takes all of the DEOs resources, including help from Lina, Alura (Kara’s mother), Mon-El, Brainiac 5, the other Legionnaires, M’yrnn, and everyone else including Sam to stop Reign. They succeed, but M’yrnn gives his life. Sam lives and is reunited with Ruby.

After Reign’s final defeat and M’yrnn’s death – J’onn decides he needs to spend more time around normal human beings and not stay cooped up at the DEO – he promotes Alex to director of the DEO. Alex, who was wondering how’d she balance her active and dangerous agent lifestyle with adopting a child is happy to take a more desk-bound position. Lina expresses friendship with Kara but anger at Supergirl for betraying her and not trusting her. Mon-El has to return to the future – and takes Winn with him, though it looks like Brainiac 5 will remain behind at the DEO.

Season 3 of Supergirl was a bit dark, but the show is still very good. I liked the female friendships in this season, though the end of season rivalry between Lina and Supergirl was a bit annoying (I hope they do not become enemies next season). Recommended.

Read my review of Season 1 of Supergirl.

Read my review of Season 2 of Supergirl.

Supergirl Season 2 Review

  • Series Title: Supergirl
  • Season: Season 2
  • Episodes: 22
  • Discs: 5
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Melissa Benoist, Mehcad Brooks, Chyler Leigh, Jeremy Jordan, Floriana Lima, Chris Wood, David Harewood
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

This review contains spoilers for the second season of Supergirl.

With it’s second season, Supergirl switches over to the CW, which frankly, is where the show belongs instead of on CBS. Also, Supergirl is now officially part of the CW DC-verse (aka the “Arrowverse”) and this season of the show includes two crossovers. Click here to read my Season 1 review of Supergirl.

There are some character changes for Season 2, Cat Grant is in the first two episodes, but then she leaves to find herself, putting new reporter, Kara Danvers, in the care of Snapper Carr. The opening episodes with Cat show her both as her acerbic self and as a mentor to Kara, and when Kara announces she wants to be a reporter, Cat hands her a sealed envelope – inside is Kara’s resume, with the word, “reporter”, written across it. But rather than shepherding Kara through her new role, Cat leaves. Snapper, Kara’s new boss, is rude, entitled, and a bit racist and sexist. As annoying as that is, by the end of the season – Kara’s experiences with Snapper do show a different type of mentorship – and for a show with a younger audience, an audience that it probably dealing with “old guard’ bosses at work that behave like Snapper or worse, and it shows how to deal with it and with people like Snapper. Kara even follows her heart and publishes a story on her own, a story that Snapper refused to publish due to his own prejudices. Breaking her contract with Catco gets Kara fired. To get her job back, not only does Kara need to find another exclusive story, and bring that story to Snapper with it’s resources and documentation done precisely as Snapper wants, but she has to share the byline with Snapper who did nothing on the story. Then Kara has to apologize to him and declare he “was right” and that she’s learned a lot from Snapper. Watching that scene is hard and it made me bristle – clearly it was Snapper who’s anti-alien prejudice prevented him from wanting to publish either story in the first place. In both cases, Kara was right in her stories – and she wasn’t writing mere opinion, but facts.

Snapper also co-opted Kara’s work and took credit for it. But, as unfair as that seems – it’s also the way of the world. That type of stuff happens all the time in the real world, and in all sorts of industries. Supergirl shows, especially to it’s young audience of teens and twenty-somethings, how to deal with those situations in the real world. Essentially by swallowing her own pride and sucking up – Kara gets her job back, and is given more freedom to do want she needs to do – be a reporter. Would Snapper have treated a male reporter the way he treats Kara? Probably not. If Kara’s stories had been full of anti-alien trash and prejudice with no research and just prejudicial language and hate speech – what would Snapper have done? Probably publish them without a single red-pen edit. In a sense, his Archie Bunker attitude is the one being criticized, while at the same time showing just how to circumvent such people. Snapper also attacks James, whom Cat has named as her successor during her sabbatical. But within an episode or two, James tells Snapper off – pulling the “I’m the boss whether you like it or not” card.

Season Two also introduces Maggie Sawyer, a National City cop, and a lesbian. Alex meets her, they become friends, Maggie gets Alex to realize she is also a lesbian, then Maggie rejects Alex. They do get back together, and Maggie is present in some form or another for the rest of the season. The Maggie/Alex relationship is brilliantly played, with ups and downs, rather than as a fairy tale. It becomes clear that both Maggie and Alex have some self-esteem issues. Both have had trouble in the past being true to themselves and opening up to others. These flaws make the characters more interesting, and give the audience different types of characters to identify with.

Winn also meets a girl (are we sensing a pattern?) an alien named Lyra. Their relationship seems fine, and very hot, until she sets him up to make it look like he broke into a museum and stole Starry Night by Van Gogh. Winn, though, doesn’t buy the police line that he was simply used. Even when Lyra tells him the same, he pushes, until he finds out that Lyra was blackmailed into the theft and a series of others to pay off her brother’s gambling debts and free him from the alien mobsters who are holding him. Even though Supergirl, Winn, Alex, and the DEO are able to free Lyra’s brother and arrest the mobsters, after the incident we seldom see Lyra.

The season introduces Megan McGann, (aka M’Gann, Miss Martian) whom at first seems to be a Green Martian refugee like J’onn J’onezz. She turns out to be a White Martian instead, one whom became disgusted at the genocide of the Green Martians on Mars – and whom helped some escape. The relationship between the two also has its ups and downs and ends with M’Gann deciding to return to Mars to find similar thinking White Martians.

Finally, Kara, herself finds love – but it’s a bumpy, season-long process. At the very beginning of the season, a Kryptonian pod crashes on Earth. It’s occupant is Mon-El of Daxam. Since Daxam, sister planet to Krypton, has also been the enemy of Krypton for centuries, we get the rare experience of seeing Kara’s prejudice against someone – namely Mon-El. She even jumps to conclusions and blames him for a crime that he is innocent of and has no knowledge of. When it quickly becomes apparent that she was wrong, Kara, to her credit, admits her mistake. She then starts to work with Mon-El, trying to basically make him exactly like herself – from wardrobe, to internship at Catco, to becoming a superhero, to wearing silly glasses to hide his identity. It doesn’t work. However, over time, the real Mon-El emerges, and as Mon-El becomes his own person – it is that person that Kara falls in love with. And Mon-El also improves himself because of knowing Kara. Once he gives up on being an intern at Catco, Mon-El gets a job as a “mixologist” at the alien bar that’s a reoccurring location for the season. But he gradually becomes more involved in helping the DEO and Kara.

This season also introduces Lynda Carter as President of the US, who passes the Alien Amnesty Act, allowing alien refugees to become US citizens. In contrast to her compassion and understanding, Cadmus – run by Lillian Luthor (Lex’s mother) is an anti-alien organization that wants the destruction of all aliens – especially Supergirl and Superman. Like most people who act out on unreasonable prejudices – Lillian sees all aliens as the same – something evil, to be hated, to be feared, and Lillian also uses her resources to stir-up hatred in the general population. Lillian is unable and unwilling to see people as individuals but sees all others as evil ones to be hated and feared. Cadmus makes threats over the airwaves, taking over the media in National City. They use alien weapons to commit crimes and attack people then blame aliens for the crimes. Cadmus even co-opts Jeremiah Danvers, Alex’s father and Kara’s adoptive father, convincing him that deporting all aliens is the Final Solution to the Alien Problem. Yeah. For the most part, however, even with the destruction, death, and set-backs (at one point the alien bar is attacked and every alien is killed), the DEO, Alex, Maggie, and Supergirl are able to stop Cadmus and Lillian.

In contrast to Lillian, Lina Luthor is actually a good person. She becomes a fast friend of Kara (who, again, was willing to hate her for being a Luthor, but saw Lina as a person and became her friend instead), and goes up against her own mother to protect the people of National City, including aliens. Lina is fascinating, she’s also a businesswoman, re-branding “LuthorCorp” as “L Corp” to distance the corporation from her notorious brother and evil mother. She develops an alien detector, which becomes a plot point, though not an over-used one.

The beginning of the season tends to have a lot of stand-alone episodes, though threads are being laid for season-long plots, especially in terms of the characters and their relationships. One problem with the stand-alone episodes is it generally goes like this: alien menace arrives, alien menace (or cyborg or constructed alien like Metallo, etc.) defeats Supergirl in a fist fight or by using special powers (Kryptonite, absorbing her powers, etc.) Kara goes to the DEO and John, Alex, Winn, and maybe James or Maggie come up with a way for Supergirl to defeat said alien menace. Supergirl challenges the menace and wins. This is a boring and repetitive plot. Fortunately, it’s only a few isolated episodes in the first half of the season, and all of those, as I’ve said, have other character stuff going on, but it’s something future seasons really need to avoid. Besides, seeing Supergirl get defeated over and over again weakens the character, and makes her subsequent wins unbelievable.

There are two crossover events for this season of Supergirl: Invasion and the Musical. Invasion is the 4-part crossover that features the entire CW DC universe (aka the Arrowverse). Invasion is actually a pretty much stand alone episode. For the Supergirl episode that introduces it – it’s pretty much just the last five minutes of the episode, when The Flash and Cisco arrive via a universe-hopping portal and ask Kara for help. She then leaves with them and spends three episodes as a lead character in Invasion. Unfortunately, those other episodes are not included on the DVD set. Because the DVD releases of all four shows were spread out over a month, it’s also not possible to stop watching Supergirl and skip over to Invasion (until after The Flash and Arrow were finally released that is). I highly recommend that, since I do enjoy the crossovers, the crossover story be released as a separate special DVD with all four episodes in order. Which isn’t to say those episodes shouldn’t be included on the season sets of their respective shows. But like the Doctor Who Christmas specials – Why not release the Crossover Event as a DVD a few weeks after it airs? I’d buy it – and I’d still buy the season sets at the end of the season. From watching Invasion during the highly-rated Crossover Week – it’s pretty stand alone anyway, and it’s a good introduce to the Arrowverse for new fans. An inexpensive DVD/Blu-Ray release would be an awesome idea.

The Musical is a story that is integrated well in the season arcs of both Supergirl and The Flash. In Supergirl, Kara has just found out that far from being the “palace guard” that she thought Mon-El was – he’s the prince. Although every one tells her to work through her anger at being lied to, in the end, Kara breaks up with Mon-El. Meanwhile, on The Flash, Barry and Iris are in a similar situation – Barry had proposed marriage to Iris, she accepted, then for plot purposes they broke it off (there will be more when I watch and review The Flash). Again, at the end of a Supergirl episode, suddenly an “alien” is being led into the operations center of the DEO, he breaks free of his bonds, and whammys Kara, who collapses. Now by this time, my copy of The Flash had arrived from Amazon, so I was able to go straight to “Duet” and watch it. In “Duet”, we find that the “alien” is the Music Meister, an imp with Mxyzptlk-like powers and an interest in “true love”. He traps Barry and Kara in a musical, which features some actors from Legends of Tomorrow and Arrow as well as The Flash – though everyone is playing different characters. They sing. I was disappointed with “Duet” though. The music was, overall, only so-so both the old songs (“Moon River”) and the originals (“Superfriends”). The storyline in the musical is OK, but pokes fun at musicals (“It really is easy to convince people in a musical!”) The story does end with a beautiful scene of Barry proposing again to Iris (for real) and in song. Kara also sees the error of her ways and declares her feelings for Mon-El.

The final arc of Supergirl is brilliant – well acted, relevant, smart, and a better season finale than even Myriad. Cat Grant returns and we realize just how much we’ve missed her. The President (Lynda Carter) becomes a important part of the story. We meet Mon-El’s parents, played by Kevin Sorbo and Teri Hatcher – and discover that Queen Rhea is the most controlling parent in the the universe (not to mention a little nuts). Rhea returns and tries to get Mon-El to return to lead the survivors of Daxam as prince and future king. But Rhea hates Kara because she’s from Krypton, and after all when Krypton was destroyed it bombarded Daxam and made the planet a wasteland. Mon-El eventually is forced to sacrifice himself and his love for Kara, but she rescues him. This puts Rhea on the warpath. She passes herself off as human, approaches Lina, and gets Lina to work with her on a portal to move goods and people from point A to point B instantaneously. There are two issues with this: one – major side effect, the radiation from the generator that runs the portal turns telepathic aliens into dynamos that attack with the uncontrolled power of a tornado, and two – Rhea has no intention of the portal being used for the humanitarian uses Lina envisions, instead she brings in a fleet of Daxamite ships, which attack National City and hold it hostage.

In the end, even though Supergirl challenges Rhea to single combat for the planet, Rhea cheats – not only by using Kryptonite, but by calling in her guards and airstrikes despite Supergirl winning. This causes Supergirl to release a weapon of mass destruction developed by Lillian and Lina Luthor – they seed the entire planet with lead, which is toxic to Daxamites. This kills Rhea outright, and means Mon-El has to leave the planet. He escapes in the Kryptonian Pod, only to be swallowed up by a wormhole.

I had to wonder about the whole “lead” thing. First, lead is highly poisonous to humans, birds, and animals – it causes brain damage to children and babies; yet Lillian, Lina, and Kara don’t seem to even notice this fact or care. Second, it’s stated several times that Supergirl and Superman (who makes several guest appearances this season) cannot see through lead. If microscopic pieces of lead are in the very atmosphere, it would rend both characters blind until the lead settled out of the air, at the very least. It would be like walking outside on a day with heavy mist – you get wet. Not as wet as in a downpour, but your face and hair is going to be covered in a fine spray of water. So the “fix” to get rid of the Daxamites doesn’t make a lot of logical sense.

Still, Season 2 of Supergirl is an enjoyable series. The characters are likable – and it’s nice to see the interpersonal struggles without either falling into the extremes of soap opera plots or perfect characters who never have problems. I liked the relevance of the series, from Superman’s “I’m with her” statement while standing next to Supergirl, to the female president who has compassion and sense, yet is still strong and capable, to the last episodes being entitled, “Resist” and “Nevertheless She Persisted” – this is a show with something to say, and that is good. Also, looking at the credits in the episode guide flyer included with the set – nearly every episode is written, co-written, and/or directed by women. And that is awesome! This season also has less of a “aimed at teenaged girls” feel and more of a “general audiences” feel which is good, many of the people who “need” the messages of this show won’t watch a program they think is for teen girls. Kudos on that.

Recommended.

 

Supergirl Season 1 Review

  • Series Title:  Supergirl
  • Season: 1
  • Episodes: 20
  • Discs: 5
  • Network: CBS
  • Cast: Melissa Benoist, Chyler Leigh, Mehcad Brooks, Jeremy Jordan, David Harewood, Calista Flockhart

Do see my Supergirl Pilot Review for my initial impressions of this series. However, it got better – much better. Although the early episodes seemed very much to be “Supergirl verses monster/villain of the week”, the season developed and once it moved into a continued storyline it improved immensely. The entire cast did a good job – after the pilot, Supergirl, her sister, Alex, and Hank from the DEO all improved, and from the very beginning I liked Winn and James Olsen. Although the structure of the show is similar to the other DC shows (on the CW), especially The FlashSupergirl did find it’s footing rather quickly in it’s first season.

Cat Grant, played beautifully by Calista Flockhart, was the most inconsistently-written character on the show. Some of the series’ writers seemed to believe a powerful woman must be a complete bitch and not in a good way (“The Devil wears Prada” stereotype). Yet, Cat could also be very strong, remarkably sensible, and the arc of her relationship with Kara shows her to be a mentor and a tough teacher. The last scene between the two of them in the season was a complete surprise. It should have been predictable and it wasn’t – making that arc work. We also see the reasons for some of Cat’s actions – and even her inconsistency. And meeting her mother really explains a lot about Cat (in short not only does her mother have Cat’s occasional meanness – but she’s snobbish and pushy as well).

The remaining characters surrounding Supergirl/Kara have their ups and downs as well – and the season has that rollercoaster feel we know so well from the CW shows. But Supergirl has it’s own tone as well. The tone of the show is hope, and unity, and strength that comes from working together rather in constant competition. Cat holds up Supergirl as a symbol of hope to National City. Kara explains to Winn that the S on her chest isn’t an S – it’s the crest of the House of El, whose motto is “Stronger Together”. The finale of the series rests on hope to defeat Myriad and the Kryptonian criminals from Ft. Rozz – the Kryptonian prison that landed on Earth. The series sees positivity as important, and human, and a real American value. It therefore stands against snark, meanness, rudeness, and especially racism and hatred of the other. From a senator’s anti-alien rallies and anti-Supergirl rhetoric to an army general’s statement that James Olsen “isn’t good enough for his daughter” – this series subtly but consistently fights against racism, hatred, and the darkness. In these times that is a strong and brave message – especially in a series that is aimed at pre-teen and teen-aged girls. That isn’t to say that adults can’t enjoy the show – it’s very much all-ages, but at least the first half of the season seemed very much to pitching itself towards that demographic audience.

As a quick glance through my blog will show, I’m a long-time DC fan, so I also appreciated the references and characters that were brought into the first season of Supergirl. Red Tornado and his creator, Dr. T.O. Morrow, were perfect. And I really enjoyed seeing Martian Manhunter – one of my favorite lesser-known characters as a regular. Maxwell Lord is also a regular – and is correctly portrayed as a very gray character. Grant Gustin’s the Flash also makes an appearance in an excellent episode called, “World’s Finest”. I hope the second season brings in more DC characters.

Season 2 of Supergirl will air on the CW, which is where this show should have been from the beginning. Overall, I recommend this show. And if you have a pre-teen or teenaged daughter, or niece or friend’s daughter – by all means introduce them to the show.