Book Review – Doctor Who: The Time Vampire

  • Title: The Time Vampire
  • Series: Doctor Who Companion Chronicles
  • Discs: 1 CD
  • Author: Nigel Fairs
  • Director: Nigel Fairs
  • Characters: Leela, Fourth Doctor
  • Cast: Louise Jameson, John Leeson
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 02/19/2020

**Spoiler Alert** The Time Vampire is a dramatic audio presentation in Big Finish’s Companion Chronicles line. It is also a sequel to The Catalyst. However, although the wrap-around story continues the wrap-around from the previous volume, with Leela prisoner of the Z’Nai, held in painful suspended animation half-living and half not, the majority of the story takes place much earlier.

The story opens with the Doctor and Leela in the console room. The Doctor is working on K-9, building Mark II because he states that K-9 has been unstable lately. But Leela is adamant that if the Doctor takes K-9 apart he will be killing him. The Doctor says he is improving K-9 and once he transfers over K-9s memory wafers he will be the same but improved. Leela wanders off but finds K-9 in the old wooden console room in the TARDIS. Then things get a bit weird. She hears someone in pain, but K-9 says no one is there. Leela asks K-9 questions, but he keeps saying he has to assimilate instructions, his memory is overloaded, and he must reboot. Leela is completely confused by this. But then the TARDIS lands.

Leela leaves the TARDIS and finds herself on a planet, in an opulent building, where all the people are wearing gold cloaks. From this point the story moves back and forth in time as the building, indeed the entire island is moving back and forth in its time stream due to a time paradox. This does make for a frustrating listen, especially when listening during one’s commute. I don’t want my Doctor Who stories to be too simple, but the back and forth nature of this story was extremely confusing and required several listens before it truly made sense. Anyway, the Island, or Leela and the Doctor are moving back and forth within the timeline of this island.

The Island is on a planet, a planet the Doctor has been to before, a planet the Doctor knows is doomed to be destroyed by the Z’nai, whom he and Leela met in The Catalyst. Leela meets a tourist guide who is showing people around an old sea fort – the most haunted place on the planet. The tourists are annoying and the tourist guide, well, he’s a tourist guide. He does show off a ghost at one point, which lets the Doctor realize who he is and what he did. The guide is the son of a chef who was on Interplanetary One, a spaceship that encountered the Z’Nai under Humbrackle’s father. The senior Humbrackle was a good man and a good emperor – he was fascinated with art, poetry, architecture, etc. The senior Humbrackle also embraced diversity and forging alliances with other species in the galaxy. But his son is a Xenophobic hater, essentially – he is so insistent that everyone be exactly like him, not only does he wish to wipe out entire species, but he has the few survivors of his armies’ attacks converted into clones of himself. The Doctor warns this Humbrackle to change his ways, but the younger Humbrackle doesn’t listen – this leads to the events in The Catalyst. But in The Time Vampire, the people on the planet where Leela and K-9 are are waiting for the Z’Nai to arrive, as the Doctor puts it, “They think the Z’Nai are coming to sign a trade agreement that was proposed under the Senior Humbrackle. But the Junior Humbrackle will destroy them. The entire planet will burn. It’s one of the great disasters of the galaxy.” When Leela mentions changing something that hasn’t happened yet, the Doctor insists it can’t be changed because it’s fixed. The Doctor also realizes to his horror that he is also on the planet, with Lord Douglas, and he “really doesn’t want to meet himself”, especially if the fabric of time is weak. There is the typical running around and gathering of information of most Doctor Who stories, although it occurs out of order.

It turns out that the “ghost” the tourist guide shows off is a trapped Time Vampire, a creature created by a time paradox, and a creature that can destroy with a touch by aging people to death. One of the people in the tourist group saw her family die when she was four years old after an encounter with a time vampire – so she now hunts them, destroying as many as she can. When she attempts to destroy this one though, K-9 kills her. The tourist guide himself was the son of a chef on Interplanetary One, but he snuck into the previous Doctor’s TARDIS, stole his cloak and stole something else – which he uses to capture the Time Vampire and force her to appear at his will to amuse the tourists – like a caged bear. The true identity of the time vampire makes sense, links to the wrap-around story, and isn’t really a surprise, even on first listen.

Overall, I thought The Time Vampire was too confusing. And the central question of the audio play, Who or What is this Time Vampire? isn’t really as much of a surprise as it should be. I also felt really bad for the planetary leader who strikes out into the galaxy, meets the Z’Nai under the Senior Humbrackle, starts arrangements for a trade agreement that should help her people, and then is burned in the worst possible way both literally and figuratively. Why should her entire planet be destroyed because Junior Humbrackle hates everyone who is different than him? That’s terribly unfair. And it’s not like she was warned that the Z’Nai had suddenly become Xenophobic maniacs out to destroy the galaxy – no one told her anything. Leela does scream at her that the Z’Nai are her enemy, but she does so after the Doctor is accused of trying to assassinate the leader with his sonic screwdriver. Needless to say, it’s a bit of a misunderstanding, but who’s going to believe the companion of an assassin? So although it is worth listening to this audio adventure a few times, overall it’s not one of my favorites. However, Louise Jameson and John Leeson are excellent performing the audio adventure.