Legends of Tomorrow Season 3 Review

  • Series Title: Legends of Tomorrow
  • Season: Season 3
  • Episodes: 18
  • Discs: 4
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Caity Lotz, Brandon Routh, Arthur Darvill, Franz Drameh, Victor Garber, Maise Richardson-Sellers, Dominic Purcell, Nick Zano, Tala Ashe, Neal McDonough, Matt Ryan, Wentworth Miller, John Noble
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

This review will contain spoilers for Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow.

Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow picks up where Season 2 left off, with the Legends discovering they “broke time”. However, no sooner do they realize this than the team runs in to Rip Hunter. Hunter explains he’s spent the last five years building the Time Bureau specifically to deal with anachronisms caused by breaks to Time. The Legends borrow the Waverider again and set off to fix Time and remove the anachronisms.

The early episodes of Legends for Season 3 are pretty self-contained and stand-alone until “Crisis on Earth X” the massive four-show crossover event. After the crossover, the episodes flow into each other, but there is still a tendency for the stories to be somewhat self-contained, more so than other CW DC series.

Besides fixing anachronisms – and managing to make things worse, as usual for the Legends, they also learn that by breaking Time there is a danger that a demon by the name of Mallus will be released from its prison. The only way to stop Mallus is by gathering the six stones of the Zambesi tribe. Much of the season has the Legends accidentally or intentionally gathering the stones, which represent: Spirit, Death, Water, Air, Earth, and Fire. Amalya has the Spirit totem, though at one point in the season it is stolen from her and the Legends have to get it back. In the third episode of the season, the Legend crew travels to a dystopian 2042 where Zari joins the crew. She possesses the Air Totem. Kuasa is a woman who possesses the Water Totem and is working with Damien Darhk. At first, Darhk seems to be up to his old tricks – causing anachronisms to help break the prison holding Mallus because he can. But when Mallus possesses his daughter, Nora, Darhk comes to realize that if the demon is released his daughter will die and he will lose her forever. The redemption of Damien Darhk is a fascinating story, especially considering he was the main villain for a year on Arrow and part of a threesome of villains on last year’s season of Legends of Tomorrow. Neal McDonough is brilliant in the part of Damien Darhk though so it is great to see him finally redeemed.

Season 3 brings in John Constantine played perfectly by Matt Ryan. Constantine is an accomplished magic user, though he also tends to have bad luck. Still, with a Time Demon as the “big bad” of the season, it makes perfect sense for Constantine to make an appearance. Constantine explains that the six stones can be used to defeat the demon, but he warns Sara about using the death totem herself. Sara ignores this advice, not because she’s stubborn, but she’s essentially fooled into using the Totem and then trapped. However, she manages to master it eventually, enough to use it against the demon when the time comes.

The Totems and Mallus are also tied in with Amalya’s history, including the destruction of her village, and the future history of her Totem (her village must be destroyed for the Totem to find its way to her granddaughter, Mari, who becomes the Detroit superheroine, Vixen.) Amalya, Nate, and the Legends, including Rip Hunter, despite their best efforts end-up breaking time in Zambesi, and Rip sacrifices himself so the Waverider can escape.

Sara takes the Waverider to Salvation in the Old West. The Legends meet up with Jonah Hex, but the town which is supposed to be a time travel blind spot – isn’t. Julius Ceasar and his Roman Legion, Leif Erickson’s sister and an attack phalanx of Vikings, and Blackbeard and his pirates, and of course – Mallus attack the town. But Amalya has figured out why simply attacking Mallus with the Totems didn’t work. The Totems must be used together. “Oh, like Voltron,” remarks Nate. The first attempt fails but in the second attempt the six Totem Bearers call forth beams of pure light which form a construct of good. Yes, these different colored beams of light that represent the elemental forces of the Totems do bring to mind Voltron – and the “being of pure good”? It’s Beebo! Beebo is a talking, fuzzy toy that a younger Martin Stein had bought for his daughter’s Hannukah present before he was accidentally sent through time to Vinland – the Viking colony in North America. The anachronism has the Vikings conquering North America instead of returning to Greenland, and worshiping the talking Beebo toy instead of becoming Christians. Anyway, the Beebo construct created by the Legends is a giant size version of Beebo – and it does manage to defeat Mallus and even kills the demon.

Legends of Tomorrow is a fun show. Whereas the other CW DC shows have gotten darker over the years (but are still good), Legends remains light. The show is also focused on character. This season Martin Stein dies during “Crisis on Earth X”, and Jax loses his firestorm powers and leaves the crew. Rip Hunter sacrifices himself to simply give the Legends time to escape – though I’m hoping he will return, or that Arthur Darvill will play another character on the series (Booster Gold, anyone? I’d love to see that.) The finale of Season 3 is wild: pirates, Roman soldiers, and Vikings attacking a Wild West town. Ava, the director of the Time Bureau, also introduces characters from the future – descendants of our characters or characters from episodes of this season (such as Helen of Troy, whom Zari drops on Themyscira rather than returning her to the Trojan War). But it’s the Voltron-style Beebo that just makes that final episode hilarious and perfect. I am still really enjoying this show and I highly recommend it.

Read my Review of Season 2 of Legends of Tomorrow.

Read my Review of Season 1 of Legends of Tomorrow.

UPDATE: I recently purchased and re-watched Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow, and I really enjoyed it. The Blu-Ray version is three Blu-Ray discs and includes the entire “Crisis on Earth-X” crossover, with the special “Crisis on Earth-X” titles.

Read my Review of Crisis on Earth-X.

Constantine – the Complete Series Review

  • Series: Constantine
  • Season: 1
  • Episodes: 13
  • Discs: 3
  • Cast: Matt Ryan, Angelica Celaya, Charles Halford, Harold Perrieneau
  • Network:  NBC (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • Blu-Ray Format: Color, Widescreen
  • Based on characters from DC and Vertigo Comics

I first saw the character of John Constantine in a guest shot on the CW’s Arrow. I enjoyed the character and Matt Ryan’s portrayal of the character. I knew the actor and character had been on his own short-lived series, a series a few friends had raved about. And I knew the character came originally from the Hellblazer comic book. But I had missed the original series – horror isn’t my thing – and my brain had somehow mixed-up “Hellblazer” with some horror movies from the 1980s.

Constantine, the Series, does have some horror elements. It also has elements of supernatural stories – at times bringing to mind series like Shadow Chasers, The X-files, and Supernatural. However, what makes this show work is the characters – especially John Constantine – exorcist, spellcaster, magic user, and con man. John Constantine is an anti-hero, but you can’t help wanting him to win. And not simply to win by defeating a demon, malevolent spirit, or ghost – but for once to not lose everyone around him. In the pilot, he meets the daughter of an old and deceased friend. When, at the end of the episode she tries to join him in his fight – John waves her off with – “everyone around me dies.” Over the course of thirteen episodes – we see how true that is. Because no matter how talented John is as a spellcaster and magic user – he’s also a bit cursed. John’s magic comes at a high price.

But again, Matt Ryan makes this show work. He is utterly convincing when uttering spells in arcane languages which may or may not be real. He’s, surprisingly, not an angry character – if anything he’s perpetually sad – struggling on in an endless fight against evil – and often losing friends in the process. John’s a pragmatist – if the only way to stop a hunger demon is to convince a friend – the one who caused it’s accidental release – to become it’s host, then that’s what John will do, even when he knows it will cause his friend his life. Constantine isn’t afraid to make sacrifices. And those sacrifices haunt him.

Other characters in the show include Zed – a psychic haunted by images of Constantine, that she can’t help but draw, who joins him in his fight. Chas, an old friend, who seemingly cannot die, In “Quid Pro Quo” we find out why and that his inability to die isn’t quite infinite. (Let’s just say that “protection spells” can have unintended consequences.) And Manny – an Angel who seems attached to John. The final episode even calls into doubt just who Manny is really working for. John also has a network of friends and associates whom we see occasionally.

Because this show comes from DC Comics – we have the inevitable “Easter Eggs”. Constantine has inherited “the Mill House” from Jasper. The house is filled with antiquities and magical artifacts. It’s bigger inside than out. The rooms move and change. It’s basically “the House of Mystery” from Justice League Dark without the ability to travel in space. And the House of Mystery is rather similar to the TARDIS but without the ability to travel in time under normal circumstances. In one episode, the helmet of Dr. Fate (Lord of Order) can be spotted among the artifacts. The Spectre (Det. John Corrigan) is present in two episodes: “Danse Vaudou” and “Waiting for the Man”. Papa Midnite is present in three episodes: “The Devil’s Vinyl”, “Danse Vaudou”, and the final story, “Waiting for the Man”. There may be more. I suspect Richie and Gary Lester weren’t invented for the television series.

Constantine ends on a bit of a cliff-hanger. And it’s an emotional one – because we suddenly learn something about Manny – a revelation that makes one question everything he’s done, his motivations, the whispering he’s done in John and Zed’s ears, respectively, etc. In other words, I almost wanted to re-watch the series from the beginning and try to determine just what Manny was doing. And I must admit, I love a series that can do that. You are told at the beginning, “Manny is an Angel”, which leads to assumptions about his character. We learned things in “Blessed are the Damned” that reinforce this point. In any case, I’d love to see the CW bring back this show. It would easily fit in with their line-up of DC superhero shows, slotting in as the “supernatural/horror” show. Or to build a show around Justice League Dark. John Constantine was the leader of Justice League Dark. Bringing the show back as Constantine would allow the answering of unanswered questions: What is The Rising Dark? Just who is Manny working for? Why is John so cursed, and being cursed, what led him to fight evil? Whereas Justice League Dark is a team book – it would allow the CW to bring in as many characters as DC would allow – and to rotate them in and out as they do in the book. Currently, there are plans for DC Animated to do a Justice League Dark movie – and Matt Ryan has already been announced as voicing John Constantine. Not only am I anxious to see that, but perhaps it will lay the foundation for a return of the character in some way.

As it stands, Constantine is an excellent though short series. Some of the grosser scenes are in the early episodes, then it lightens up for the most part. This is a character-driven supernatural drama, built on the DC Comics tradition of magic users and spellcasters. It’s a show I can recommend. I have the Blu-Ray version but it’s also available on DVD – directly from Warner Archive and also from retailers like Amazon. Do check it out!