Superman Doomsday

  • Title:  Superman – Doomsday
  • Director:  Bruce Timm, Lauren Montgomery, Brandon Vietti
  • Voice Director:  Andrea Romano
  • Date:  2007
  • Studio:  Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: Action, Animation, Drama, Fantasy
  • Cast:  Adam Baldwin, Anne Heche, James Marsters, John Dimaggio, Tom Kenny, Swoosie Kurtz, Cree Summer
  • Format: Widescreen, color animation
  • DVD Format:  Blu-Ray 

“Just look at him, so sleek, so powerful, so beautiful, like some great golden god made flesh. Of course, any sensible god would demand absolute obidence in return for his favor. But no, our Man of Steel protects us and keeps us with no strings attached. And the people, hum, they practically worship him anyway. Enjoy your reign while you may, Superman, for as surely as night follows day, there comes a time when even gods must die.” – Lex Luthor, prologue

“The subject in question was biologically engineered to be the ultimate soldier: precise, clinical, unstoppable. But its creators came to realize it could not distinguish between friend and foe, thus this Doomsday machine lives to extinguish any and all life forms. Because it must.” Superman’s robot in the Fortress of Solitude

Luthor has a group of scientists and miners digging to the Earth’s core in search of a new energy source that Lexcorp can sell. However, they get more than they bargain for by freeing Doomsday, a biological killing machine. Luthor will later have his assistant Mercy eliminate all trace of Lexcorp’s involvement in freeing Doomsday, and to cover his tracks further, Lex cold-heartedly murders Mercy.

Doomsday escapes and wrecks havoc. Lois and Superman had been having a romantic get away to Superman’s Fortress of Solitude, when Superman’s robot informs him of Doomsday’s attacks on Metropolis. They return. Superman fights Doomsday, and they both cause havoc. Lois and Jimmy Olsen cover the story. The fight between Superman and Doomsday wrecks buildings, causes havoc, and ranges all over Metropolis – city streets, subway tunnels, city streets again. But in the end, Superman does the only thing he can – he grabs Doomsday from the back, flies straight up to the stratosphere, then crashes to Earth. He and Doomsday land in a huge impact crater. Doomsday is stopped, but Superman is also killed. Superman crawls out from beneath Doomsday’s body, and dies in Lois’s arms. Jimmy Olsen takes a picture of the dead Superman, and of Lois with tears streaming down her face.

Martha Kent, who had been watching the fight between Superman and Doomsday on TV, collapses off her chair, tears streaming down her cheeks. In the wake of Superman’s death, Clark Kent is missing, though Perry White is convinced he’s “fine” just incommunicato in Afghanistan (where Kent had gone as a war correspondent). Lois decides she has to talk to Clark’s mother, and drives to Smallville to see her. At first, Martha is suspicious, but when Lois talks about being “in love with him” and “being loved by him” the two go inside to talk.

Lois returns to Metropolis and covers a story of Toyman threatening a schoolbus full of kids. She sneaks inside to rescue the kids, and all of them get out but one little girl. Lois and the girl are also threatened by a “Chuckie”-type living doll/toy with a big knife. Lois defeats the toy/doll, but Toyman pushes the bus off the building. Lois and the little girl are rescued by “Superman”. At first, Lois is overjoyed to have Superman back – but then she notices things – like he doesn’t know where her apartment is, and his attitude towards her is cold and clinical not romantic. Lois tries to figure out if it’s a result of Superman’s trauma, or if this Superman is perhaps not really Superman.

Lois becomes even more suspicious when Clark Kent still doesn’t return or make contact, and Martha calls her and says that even though “Superman” has returned – Clark hasn’t contacted her, he hasn’t even called.

The new Superman goes to confront Luthor, but he’s trapped in a room filled with red sunlight, and Luthor beats him up with Kryptonite brass knuckles. We then learn two things – this new Superman isn’t Superman, he’s a clone made by Luthor and under his control. And Luthor actually missed his enemy Superman so much after his death, he made the clone but a clone who would work for him. Luthor also has Superman’s dead body in status.

Lois tries to get Jimmy to help her investigate, but Jimmy, feeling his mortality after the huge Superman – Doomsday fight in Metropolis, has quit the Daily Planet, and taken a well-paid job as a Paparazzi photographer for a tabloid. Jimmy refuses to help the first time Lois asks.

Meanwhile, Superman’s robot steals Superman’s real body from Lex Luthor. The robot takes the body to the Fortress of Solitude where it turns out Superman isn’t dead – his pulse had slowed down to a rate of once every 17 days to allow him to heal. It had taken the robot 17 days to detect it, and another 17 days to pin-point the location. The robot tells the still injured Superman he retrieved him from LexCorp.

“Superman” takes on Toyman, and, after learning the villain had killed a young child at a day care center, takes him from police custody, flies up high with Toyman, then drops Toyman to his death on top of a police car. Jimmy takes a picture of the bloody and very dead Toyman. It becomes very apparent this this is not the Superman we know – he’s cold, threatening, and scary. Plus he’s still very, very powerful. When the police commissioner asks Superman to come in for questioning – Superman simply refuses because he has “better things to do”, and there’s nothing anyone can do to stop him.

At the Fortress of Solitude, the robot continues to treat Kal-El, the real Superman.

Back in Metropolis, “Superman” goes into a beauty shop and looks into a mirror. With his X-ray vision he finds a lead ball in his head containing Kryptonite. He uses his laser heat vision to remove it.

Lex Luthor hits on Lois when she confronts him. Lois lets Lex kiss her – and knocks him out with a hypo. She, and Jimmy search Lex’s office.  Lois and Jimmy use Lex’s unconscious body on a retinal scanner. They find Lex’s bank of cloned Supermen.  Lex arrives to kill Lois and Jimmy, then Superman arrives. Superman destroys the clone bank. Superman locks Lex in the red room and takes the entire thing into the stratosphere then throws it to the ground.

Meanwhile at the Fortress of Solitude, Superman weight-lifts and exercises to tone his body. He hears the news reports of Lex Luthor’s death. The army is mobilized in Metropolis to take out “Superman” for “killing” Lex Luthor.

The real Superman, in a solar suit, armed with a Kryptonite gun, flies to Metropolis to confront the clone “Rogue Superman”. Superman tries to use the Kryptonite gun, but it goes flying. Superman and Rogue Superman fight. There is a lot of destruction during the fight. Lois grabs the Kryptonite gun, but when she fires at Rogue Superman – she misses. Rogue Superman beats up Superman. However, Superman is able to get the Kryptonite into Rogue Superman’s chest and it explodes – destroying him. Superman is also weakened by the blast but survives. He kisses Lois Lane as proof that he’s the “real” Superman. At the end he reveals himself to Lois as Clark Kent.

Luthor also is reveal to be not as dead as he appears.

This animated film adapts the Death of Superman storyline from the regular weekly Superman comic books. The blu-ray is accompanied by three excellent documentaries – especially the one on the public and press reaction to the Death of Superman (Superman # 75), as well as trailers and sneak peeks for other films in the DC Animated Universe series of films. However, this film also has some changes and unique features that differ from the original printed story. First, Bruce Timm, who co-wrote, produced, and co-directed the film with others introduced Luthor both as a narrator for the story and as the cause of Doomsday’s escape. I thought that made the film stronger – if someone’s going to kill Superman – it should be his well-known enemy. Second, though, simply for time limitations, many of the vignettes of the one to two-year long story arc of the death of Superman and his return weren’t used.

Also, this story, like many Superman stories, is a slug fest. Yes, it’s a slug fest where Superman loses, and he has to sacrifice himself to stop the threat, but it’s still a slug fest. The second half of the film -the world without a Superman, and Lois, Perry, Jimmy, and Martha all coping with there grief in their own ways, was better than the opening and closing fight scenes. However, I wanted to see more of that human story – especially Lois and Martha. Specifically, when Lois goes to see Martha at the Kent family farm, and Martha invites her in – I really wanted to see what happened next.

The animation in Superman- Doomsday was incredible. It was gorgeous and at times I forgot I was watching an animated film. It was that good. I haven’t seen a DC Comics / Warner Brothers Animation film that looked this good since Batman: Under the Red Hood (which, yes, I realize chronologically came after this – but I saw it first.) The realistic animation style and the seriousness of the subject matter also reminded me strongly of Batman: Under the Red Hood.

I will say though that this animated film from several years ago handled Doomsday and the Death of Superman better in many ways that a certain live-action film that is probably still in theaters.

Recommendation:  See It – especially  if your a fan of Superman or good animation
Rating: 4 Stars
Next film: I have several new films to choose from, but probably Spy

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Green Lantern First Flight

  • Title: Green Lantern First Flight
  • Director: Lauren Montgomery
  • Date: 2009
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: SF, Action, Animation
  • Cast: Christopher Meloni, Tricia Helfer, John Larroquette, William Schallert
  • Format: Widescreen Color Animation
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

Another excellent movie in the DC Animated Universe series. This one gives us Hal Jordan’s origin story and the betrayal of the Green Lantern Corps by Sinestro in one fell swoop. And it’s Sinestro who initially takes Hal under his wing and starts his training. But Hal, especially after being set up by Sinestro realizes he’s not the “super-cop” or in this case “super Lantern” everyone thinks he is. So Hal is learning about the corps, learning to use his powers, and yet still smart enough to realize when something just isn’t right. I also liked Hal’s constructs — witty, useful, and showing us Hal’s personality in glowing green light. This is Hal Jordan.

The story is also very dark at times. Sinestro kills Keja Ro — whom he’s secretly been working with to find the Yellow Element and construct (or have constructed for him) the Great Weapon. He then frames Hal Jordan for the crime, getting the newest Lantern thrown out of the Corps. But Hal isn’t willing to go quietly. When Sinestro shows up on Oa with the Yellow Battery (the Great Weapon) he does considerable damage, killing countless Lanterns. One of the most impressive scenes, in terms of “wow” factor is after Sinestro destroys the Green Power Battery on Oa, a few minutes later, it rains green rings — the “sky” is filled with countless rings. Sinestro explains they are from all the Lanterns in space, unprotected, once the power of the battery was shut off. The shear size of Sinestro’s crime is almost unimaginable.

Hal, however, tries to help and fight back, and finally a Guardian gets him his ring, Hal charges it through a crack in the Power Battery, then goes after Sinestro — and what a fight! These guys are throwing planets around.

By the way — a lot of members of Green Lantern Corps make their appearances: Sinestro, Kilowog, Bodica, Tamor-Re, even Chip and it’s great to see them. Un-named alien Corps members are also seen in various crowd shots. It was nice to see they paid attention to the rich Green Lantern history from DC Comics.

Overall, an impressive movie, I recommend it.

Recommendation: See It
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Superman Batman Apocalypse

  • Title: Superman/Batman Apocalypse
  • Director: Lauren Montgomery
  • Voice Director: Andrea Romano
  • Date: 2010
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: Action, Animation, Drama
  • Cast: Kevin Conroy, Tim Daly, Susan Eisenberg, Summer Glau, Edward Asner, Andre Braugher
  • Format: Color Animation, Widescreen
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

“This is how they see you. Bigger than life. You’re their champion.”— Kara to Clark

“Ever since this girl came into our lives, you’ve let your guard down, Clark, even exposed your secret identity – despite common sense.”— Batman

“Unlike you, Bruce, I don’t look for the bad in everyone. You may think I’m naive but every instinct tells me this girl is my cousin. She’s done nothing to show me otherwise and she’ll be safe with me.”— Superman

“This might not be the right time, but you’ve always been an inspiration to me.”— Big Barda

“Barda…”— Wonder Woman
“Seriously, Diana, when someone brings hope to another person? It’s a gift.”— Big Barda

The film opens with the voice-over of a radio talk show, among items mentioned are former President Lex Luthor’s impeachment and the frequent meteor showers of Kyptonite meteorites. Both items refer to the previous film, Superman Batman Public Enemies. Suddenly, a huge meteor hits in Gotham harbor and eyewitnesses call it in to the radio station, cue opening credits.

A naked girl arrives on the Gotham docks. Longshoremen act, well, as they would, but she trashes two of them. A third gives her his trench-coat. She takes it, then runs into the street, where she’s hit by a car, which barely slows her down. This mysterious girl causes havoc where ever she goes. Batman catches up to her, and she blows up one of Gotham’s new auto-blimps. Superman arrives and tosses the blimp into the harbor before it can crash into something and cause real damage. Batman meanwhile uses Kryptonite to calm down the girl. This knocks her out and he’s able to take her to the Batcave.

In the Batcave, Superman arrives, and he and Kara speak in Krypton. Superman learns this is Kara, his cousin. Krypto the dog also arrives, but doesn’t seem to trust Kara. Batman and Superman agree to keep her in quarantine. Kara remembers her parents putting her in a ship, then dying (as well as the bright flash of the planet being destroyed). Batman, still not sure, is protective of Superman.

Meanwhile on Apocalypse, Darkseid is training a new Queen Fury. However, she fails her test – a fight with the Furies, and is killed. Granny Goodness and Darkseid look on during the fight.

Clark takes Kara shopping (and appears to have Bruce Wayne’s budget). They end up in a park, where he shows her a statue of Superman. There’s a bright flash of light, and someone arrives. Kara fights, her powers get out of control, and she trashes the park. Wonder Woman and Batman explain Kara needs more training and they are taking her away for her own good. Reluctantly, Superman agrees.

Wonder Woman takes Kara to Paradise Island. Superman and Batman, along with Wonder Woman and her Amazon sisters, watch Kara battle Artemis. Kara loses. Superman is a bit freaked by this and even tries to protect his cousin from a perceived threat. Kara runs off and spends time with her friend the Prophetess Harbinger.

Meanwhile a Boom Tube arrives bringing Doomsday – an army of Doomsdays. Wonder Woman leads her army of Amazons to fight them. Batman and Superman fight as well. Superman defeats the Doomdays with his heat vision. He’s upset by using his power in such a way, but Wonder Woman points out they weren’t really alive. Batman realizes the attack was a diversion and leads Superman and Wonder Woman to find Kara. On the other side of Paradise Island, Superman approaches a body in the water – it’s Harbinger. Kara’s been taken to Apocalypse.

Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman drop in on Big Barda, who’s in witness protection in a small town. They ask her for Mother Box so they can open a Boom Tube to Apocalypse. Barda offers to come too. The four soon arrive on Apocalypse. Big Barda and Wonder Woman face the Furies.  Batman faces mechanical tiger/dog beasts. Superman also faces off against mechanical monsters before challenging Darkseid.

However, when Superman gets to Darkseid, Kara’s been brainwashed to fight for him. Batman arrives in Darkseid’s throne room and tells him he’s set all the hell spores (megaton bombs – a single one can destroy a planet, Batman has rigged 500) to blow. Darkseid thinks Batman is bluffing and threatens him with the Omega Beam. However, as they fight and Darkseid over-powers Batman, he realizes that Batman might not be bluffing. He releases Batman and Kara to Superman. Darkseid orders Batman to disarm the hell spores and leave Apocalypse.

Clark takes Kara to Smallville and to the Kent farm. But instead of his parents, Darkseid is waiting there. Darkseid threatens Kara with his Omega beams. Both Kara and Clark fight Darkseid. Darkseid sends Superman into orbit, but he drifts towards the sun – regaining his powers. Seeing Kara hurt, Superman goes nuts, and trashes Darkseid. Darkseid uses his Omega beams. Superman does a good impersonation of a twister on Darkseid. Darkseid leaves via Boom Tube. Superman embraces Kara. She reveals she’s changed the destination on the Boom Tube – sending Darkseid into deep space. The Kents arrive, only to see their farm has been trashed and their house collapses. Clark promises to re-build everything.

At the end, Superman introduces Supergirl (Kara) to the Amazons on Paradise Island.

Overall, I liked this better the second time around. It’s still not as much fun as Public Enemies, and it’s definitely more a Superman story than a Batman one. In fact the graphic novel this is based on is Superman Batman Supergirl. But I liked that Wonder Woman had such a big part in the film. It was also very cool to see Big Barda – and as a good guy no less (she’s often ambiguous at best). Darkseid is a Superman villian, though, so again, very much a Superman story. The voice cast is excellent – Kevin Conroy reprises his role from Batman the Animated Series and Justice League.  Susan Eisenberg is again Wonder Woman (she had voiced Wonder Woman / Diana in Justice League). Tim Daly from Superman the Animated Series and Superman / Batman Public Enemies is back. And the guest cast includes Summer Glau as Supergirl, Ed Asner as Granny Goodness, and Andre Braugher as Darkseid. The film also has a lot, and I mean, a lot of fight sequences. There are a few character moments, but not many. I’d have preferred a more character-driven storyline with fewer fight sequences. Also, I would have liked to see more of Clark’s views of Bruce and Bruce’s views of Clark – as that was what made the graphic novel series so much fun.

Recommendation: See it, especially if you are a Superman fan.
Rating: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Justice League Doom

  • Title: Justice League Doom
  • Director: Lauren Montgomery
  • Voice Director: Andrea Romano
  • Date: 2012
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: Action, Drama, Animation
  • Cast: Kevin Conroy, Tim Daly, Susan Eisenberg, Nathan Fillion, Carl Lumbly, Michael Rosenbaum, Claudia Black, Paul Blackthorne, Olivia D’abo, Alexis Denisoff, Phil Morris, Robin Atkin Downes
  • Format: Widescreen, Color animation
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

“When we fought before, I broke the bat; today I break the man.” — Bane to Bruce Wayne

“No, you weren’t afraid, not really. You were dosed with a synthesized version of the Scarecrow’s fear gas. Because will is the source of your strength.”— Batman
“And fear is the enemy of will.” — Green Lantern, Hal Jordan

Justice League Doom brings back most of the original cast from the original Justice League animated television series, only substituting Nathan Fillion as Green Lantern Hal Jordan, rather than keeping Phil LaMarr as GL Jon Stewart or introducing Guy Gardner. There is also a stellar cast of “guest stars” as the Leaguers greatest foes.

Vandal Savage uses Mirror Master to obtain secret files from the Batcave – files that Batman created containing plans on how to bring down any of the main Justice League members in case they went rogue. The villains then begin to attack and defeat the League members. Mirror Master gets Flash to put his hand inside a Schrodinger’s cat box to rescue an old woman. Flash ends up with a bomb in his wrist that will explode if he stops, de-accelerates, or does nothing when the timer runs out. Cheetah fist-fights Wonder Woman, but poisons her with her finger nails so everyone she sees looks and sounds like Cheetah. Green Lantern Hal Jordan is sent to a Salt Mine to rescue some hostages from a militia group and the rescue goes wrong – a woman who is a dead ringer for Carol (Hal’s former girlfriend) is killed. Even running into Star Sapphire doesn’t help Hal realize he’s been set up. Martian Manhunter is slipped a poison that caused him to sweat Magnesium, which bursts into flame, even under water. Superman is shot in the chest with a Kryptonite bullet. Bane takes Bruce’s parents out of their graves. A groundskeeper (not Alfred) reports this to Bruce, who goes out to investigate in civilian clothes. He’s jumped by Bane, who beats him up, then drops him into his mother’s (new) grave, and buries him alive, with her skeleton in her coffin.

Bruce, stranded underground, takes the keys out of his pocket and starts to pummel the coffin lid. He’s about to give up, when he turns and sees his mother’s skeleton staring at him — and he renews his attack and escapes. It’s a very eerie and spooky image — but it’s also something that is just “so Batman” and “so Bruce” — he cannot ever give up on the oath he swore to his parents that faithful night when he was only eight years old.

Once he’s escaped, Batman contacts the other Justice League members to get them out of their immediate danger, then they meet to find out what’s going on.

Meanwhile, Vandal Savage has gathered the villains together to take out the Justice League, so he can put a secondary plan into motion. Once the various villains report their success — they insist on joining Savage in his plans. Savage’s plan is to fire a missile into the sun, causing a massive solar flare which will destroy the sunward side of the Earth as well as send out an EMP that will fry anything electronic. The Justice League arrives, and each member fights his or her opposite number villain. However, despite the assistance of Cyborg, Savage’s missile is fired. Superman and Green Lantern attempt to stop the missile at the sun, but fail, giving the League seven minutes to figure out what to do. They come up with something — and Earth is saved.

I really liked the first part of  the story — that Batman would have contingency plans for taking out everyone in the League (though his plans were non-lethal) is both scary, and yet fitting with his personality. I would have liked to see more of a sense of the League’s sense of betrayal though — not only that Batman would do that, but that he’d keep detailed records of his potential plans. After the Justice League saves Earth, they discuss what to do with Batman, and it’s Clark who tells Bruce that he was right, then asks what safety valve exists for Bruce — Bruce responds, “The Justice League”. In other words, he’s created an equal and balanced system. But, I would have liked more. More storyline, more background, especially for the villains, even more dialogue between the Leaguers (and between Alfred and Bruce. Alfred appears and then suddenly disappears, before just as suddenly appearing again. It was very frustrating). With six heroes and seven villains, including Savage, plus the opening gambit with the Royal Flush Gang, the film really should have been longer than 76 Minutes, and more flushed out.

I also felt the film fell a little flat at the end. It sort of turns into, “Of course the Justice League will win,” and really loses momentum. There’s some great stuff with Superman and Hal in space as they try to stop the missile and fail, but there’s still no real sense of danger — in part because Savage’s plan is just too big. I like the more subtle villains with subtle plans (like Lex Luthor becoming the US president — which he did in the DC Universe).

Still, it was great to see the re-united Justice League cast together again. I’d like to see Doom as the pilot for a new Justice League series, but I doubt it will happen. Still, one can hope. I will admit it was great to see the Legion of Doom appear threatening instead of as a joke, though. If you’re a DC fan you’ll enjoy this!

Recommendation: See it, especially if you’re a DC fan.
Rating: 4 out of 5

Justice League Crisis on Two Earths

 

  • Title: Justice League Crisis on Two Earths
  • Directors: Sam Liu, Lauren Montgomery
  • Date: 2010
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: Action, Drama, Animation
  • Cast: William Baldwin, Mark Harmon, Chris Noth, Gina Torres, James Woods
  • Format: Color, Widescreen
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

“I can’t believe we’re having this discussion. Of course we’re going to help.”— Wonder Woman
“She’s right, that’s what we do.”— Superman

“Might doesn’t make right. It might seem that way sometimes, but in the long run it’s the other way around. We’re always stronger when we’re doing the right thing.”— Rose Wilson (the alt-Earth president’s daughter)

The movie opens with Lex Luther in the midst of a robbery and about to get caught. His partner, a guy in a jester’s outfit gives his life, so Lex can escape. We soon discover this is an alternative Earth, and this Lex is a good guy — the “Justice League”, on this particular Earth, are known as the “Crime Syndicate” and are the bad guys. Lex dimension jumps to our Justice League Earth to ask for help.

After a short discussion, six of the seven Justice Leaguers go with Lex to his Earth — Batman stays behind to oversee the construction of the Watchtower. On the other Earth, the Justice League discovers things are as Lex said — the crime syndicate uses bribes and muscle to prevent police, attorneys general, governments, etc from stopping them and the populace lives in limited terror (their day-to-day lives are “free” but if they don’t toe-the-line in bowing down to the crime syndicate, they are subject to possibly even lethal rebuke). One person standing up to the crime syndicate is Rose, the president’s daughter, much to her father’s chagrin, as he made a deal with the crime syndicate years ago.

Unbeknownst to the president, things are about to go from bad to worse — the crime syndicate now has a device that can destroy the whole planet. And Owlman (the evil Batman) wants to do even worse than that and destroy all the alternate Earths by unleashing the device that will destroy all realities on Earth Prime.

Meanwhile, Owlman sends Superwoman to the JL’s reality to steal the trigger for the device. She fights Batman and gets the device, but Batman follows her when she escapes, by flinging himself  into her transport beam. This costs him, as Superwoman beats him up again in another fight.

There is a fantastic fight sequence with each of the Justice Leaguers fighting their opposite numbers on the crime syndicate’s home base on the moon. However, Owlman is able to locate Earth Prime and take the device there. Batman theorizes the only way to get to Owlman now is to have someone vibrate quick enough to open a portal. Convincing the crime syndicate they have to work together or all realities will disappear, Batman gets Johnny Quick to open the portal.  Batman leaps through, he and Owlman have a philosophical discussion, then fight, then Batman sends him to an abandoned Earth. Owlman could escape, but he’s so insane he decides not to, and is destroyed.

The movie is quite, quite good. The fight scenes are extremely well-realized, especially the climatic fight between the Justice League and their opposite numbers. James Woods is chilling as Owlman, reminding me a bit of a character from the film, Watchmen, though not his namesake (who was sort of a good guy). However, he’s completely insane, having decided that because every choice results in a new reality — nothing has any meaning, leading to his idea to destroy all reality (Hum, sounds like Davros and his reality b*m b from DW?). There’s a couple of other references to DW as well — Owlman’s plane has a Chameleon circuit, though I think it was Flash who asks ‘What does that do?” before nearly getting run over by the invisible plane. The device itself, abbreviated, Q.E.D., which was not working, is said to work when the Blinovitch Limitation Effect is eliminated.

Owlman’s speech on Earth Prime is chilling — but his decision to not save himself when Batman sends him to an abandoned world is even more so. Superwoman is also a complete psychopath, who enjoys hurting, maiming, and playing with people — she and Owlman have a very twisted relationship. In one of her fights with Batman, she says to him, “That’s going to cost you a rib,” then takes her thumb and presses his side hard enough to break a rib. Batman is left gasping in pain.

Overall, definitely one of the better Warner Brothers Animated DCAU movies, and I recommend it.

Recommendation: See it!
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Batman Year One

  • Title: Batman: Year One
  • Directors: Sam Liu, Lauren Montgomery
  • Date: 2011
  • Studio: Warner Brothers Animation
  • Genre: Action, Drama, Animation, Film Noir
  • Cast: Bryan Cranston, Ben McKenzie, Eliza Dushku, Katee Sackhoff
  • Format: Color, Widescreen Animation
  • DVD Format: R1, NTSC

The animation in this film is very impressive — it’s difficult to get a gritty, dark look to animation, yet Batman: Year One manages to do so. This film impressively keeps the look of Frank Miller’s Batman: Year One from the Batman comic book published by DC Comics. This is also Jim Gordon’s story, and cast in the role of Lt. James Gordon is Bryan Cranston, who does a good job.  The film is also real film noir stuff. Film Noir doesn’t have heroes, it has protagonists. The difference being a hero is frequently perfect (or can be thought of as perfect or trying to obtain perfection. Superman is a hero — invulnerable to anything bar Kryptonite, immortal, and always, always doing the perfect thing without errors or mistakes). A protagonist is much more realistic — Batman, in whatever guise you find him, has always been a protagonist.

Batman: Year One, though, makes Jim Gordon the protagonist. He’s a honest cop, which is dangerous in a town with a dishonest and corrupt police force. He’s just moved to Gotham City, after turning in a dirty cop to Internal Affairs in another city, and not being thanked for his efforts. But Gordon is no perfect angel. He has an affair while his wife is pregnant. He watches and waits as he’s introduced to the corruption in the Gotham PD, but he isn’t anxious to make the same mistakes he did before. And he’s tough.

Batman: Year One, is also the story of Gotham City. A nightmare town, full of danger, violence, graft, corruption, and sex. Catwoman starts off as a hooker. She’s also trying to protect a young girl who’s starting in the trade as well, when Bruce meets her for the first time. Gotham is rough, scary and dark — and it needs the Dark Knight as a protector. This is a city that understands when Batman says, “I am the dark, I am the night, I am Batman.”

Unfortunately, Batman doesn’t get to utter that line, or any other seminal Batman lines of Bruce claiming his identity as his own. Part of the problem is the actor they got for Batman/Bruce (Ben McKenzie) just doesn’t do a very good job. I can’t believe this guy as Batman, he just doesn’t work. Why, oh why, couldn’t they have asked Kevin Conroy back? Or at least Bruce Greenwood? This Batman is too weak, and doesn’t work as Bruce either. A good Batman must also always be able to carry the part of Bruce Wayne, something Christain Bale and Kevin Conroy could do. In this version, Bruce is either WAY over-the-top, or so morose he sounds semi-suicidal. Neither is right for Bruce Wayne, not even a young Bruce Wayne.

Alfred is also practically non-existent in this film. One of the advantages of early Batman stories, is they tend to use Alfred more. And the Alfred and Bruce relationship has always been one of my favorites in the Batman mythos. (The other is Batman and Nightwing. And there’s a similarity between those two relationships. Alfred is very much a father to Bruce — he raised him, and is the only person in the entire DC universe to have any idea what Bruce was like before that fatal night. Bruce, in turn, raised Dick Greyson, and he’s very much a father to the younger man.) There was a missed opportunity, by showing Alfred hardly at all.

But if Alfred is practically non-existent in Batman: Year One, it’s ironic, given the title of the film, that Batman really doesn’t get much screen time. This is Gordon’s story, it’s Gotham’s story, but it sure isn’t Batman’s story — and therefore it misses the boat. I was disappointed, for I did have high hopes. So, yes, the film is good, and the animation is incredible, but it’s not great (as it should be), and that’s to be laid at the feet of a major casting mis-step.

Recommendation: See it at least, it’s worth it for the noir story.
Rating: 3 out of 5 Stars