The Three Musketeers

  • Title:  The Three Musketeers
  • Director:  Stephen Herek
  • Date:  1993
  • Studio:  Walt Disney Pictures
  • Genre:  Adventure
  • Cast:  Charlie Sheen, Kiefer Sutherland, Chris O’Donnell, Oliver Platt, Tim Curry, Rebecca De Mornay, Gabrielle Anwar, Paul McGann
  • Format:  Color, Widescreen
  • DVD Format:  NTSC, Region 1

“You go back, and you tell the Cardinal, we will continue to perform our sworn duty, which is to protect the King, and we will use every means in our power to fight him.” – Athos

“A remarkable woman – the most beautiful I’ve ever known, and the deadliest, which would explain my attraction.” – Cardinal Richelieu

“D’Artagnan, would you be so kind as to redistribute this wealth? [D’Artagnan looks confused] Throw the coins, man, people are hungry.” – Aramis

“This world is an uncertain realm filled with danger, honor undermined by the pursuit of power, freedom sacrificed when the weak are oppressed by the strong, but there are those who oppose these powerful forces, who dedicate their lives to truth, honor, and freedom. Those men are known as Musketeers.” – the King

Disney’s The Three Musketeers is a fun, adventurous, romp. Although there are lines here and there referring to the sorry state of the people of France, and the assassination of the previous King of France (the new King’s father), it’s not dwelt upon – at all. The result is this is a fun, light, frothy adventure film.

With the death of the previous King, and a very young new King on the throne of France, the evil Cardinal Richelieu is posed to take over France, and even aims to become King himself. Richelieu is played with considerable relish, and some chewing of scenery by Tim Curry, so you know it’s going to be fun. Richelieu’s opening move is to dismantle the Musketeers the King’s personal and private guard. Told of the disbanding of the Musketeers, the men ceremonially burn their blue tunics and turn in their swords.

Three Musketeers refuse to give in, however, and become outlaws.

Meanwhile, Chris O’Donnell plays an arrogant young man who is on his way to Paris to join the Musketeers like his father. He gets into a duel with Girard, who believes he wronged his sister. The duel is, however, swiftly broken up and the young man, D’Artagnan, heads to Paris. Upon arriving he find a man in the destroyed former HQ of the Musketeers. Assuming the HQ has merely been moved, he asks for the new location. D’Artagnan learns that the Musketeers have been disbanded. He manages to get Athos, Porthos, and Aramis, upset with him and ends up with appointments for duels with each of them – at 12:00, 1:00, and 2:00, respectively.

When he arrives, late, for his duel with Athos, he meets the other Musketeers as well. The three are surprised to learn D’Artagnan has arranged duels with them all. And D’Artagnan is shocked to learn the three men he’s agreed to fight are Musketeers. He finds no joy in killing a Musketeer. But there will be no killing – the Cardinal’s guards attack and the four men fight back. The Three Musketeers are surprised by the young D’Artagnan’s skill. They defeat the first group of the Cardinal’s guards, then another group attacks. Athos urges D’Artagnan to leave and go home.

D’Artagnan, doesn’t leave, gets separated from the group and is captured. But he frees himself from the dungeons and hears the Cardinal meet Mi Lady D’Winter – and hears their entire plan. Richelieu plans to betray France to England by signing a treaty with Lord Buckingham – his payment for this will be the throne of France. Mi Lady D’Winter will carry his terms, and the treaty to Calais. Somehow, though he hears the entire plan, D’Artagnan doesn’t see Mi Lady D’Winter, or forgets who she is when he meets her later.

The Three Musketeers rescue D’Artagnan from the chopping block – literally, and they escape in the Cardinal’s own coach. The four drink the Cardinal’s wine, eat his food, and give his coin to the poor as they leave Paris. D’Artagnan tells the Musketeers of Richelieu’s plot – and the Musketeers realize that if they can stop the spy and get the treaty, they will be able to prove Richelieu’s a traitor, as well as saving France. Unfortunately, the Cardinal knows that D’Artagnan knows about his plot – he orders a 1000 gold coin bounty on the heads of him and the Musketeers. This makes getting to Calais difficult.

To make their travel less obvious, and to double the chances of finding the spy – the four split into two groups. Athos and D’Artagnan are attacked by bounty hunters. D’Artagnan offers to stay with Athos (until the bitter end, because they are outnumbered by men with guns, or at least, muskets), but Athos orders him to go on to Calais, knowing that finding the spy, stopping Richelieu and rescuing the King are more important than a single Musketeer’s life.

D’Artagnan takes the surviving horse and heads off but eventually falls asleep and falls off his horse. He’s picked up by a woman in a carriage – a woman he doesn’t recognize. She’s Mi Lady D’Winter. They go to the ship for her meeting with Buckingham. But Porthos and Aramis have reached the ship first, and have knocked out or killed the crew. The Musketeers end-up with the treaty, and D’Artagnan is again, rescued. Mi Lady D’Winter turns out to be Sabine – Athos wife, whom he kicked out and thought dead. Athos had regretted his decision to kick out his wife (he thought her an enemy of France and a murderer, she professed her innocence, he exiled her anyway.)

The next morning she’s to be executed. Athos had tried to get her to tell him the rest of Richelieu’s plan, but she refuses. At the execution, Athos stops the ax-man. Sabine reveals that Richelieu plans to have the King assassinated at his birthday celebration, that Friday. She forgives Athos for not believing in her all those years ago, then kills herself by jumping off a cliff.

The Musketeers and D’Artagnan rush to Paris, leaving “All for one and One for All” markers everywhere in their wake. At the birthday celebration, the four try, desperately, to find the assassin. He gets a shot off, misses, and the plaza fills with Cardinal’s guards and Musketeers. D’Artagnan, meanwhile fights the assassin on a nearby rooftop. The battle moves inside as Athos, Porthos, Aramis, and D’Artagnan, try to find and rescue the King and Queen from the Cardinal. They succeed, the Cardinal is captured, and the King admits D’Artgnan into the Musketeers.

Again, this is fun, light, adventure film. There’s no serious violence. No one gets killed. The good guys win and the bad guys lose. In the middle there’s lots, and lots, of sword-fighting to enjoy – as well as chases. The film’s score is excellent, and the cast is good – if a bit young. The filming is gorgeous – and especially the greens just pop off the screen. The whole film has a very storybook quality to it. It’s highly enjoyable, and not too deep. I recommend this, especially for families.

Recommendation:  See it!
Rating:  Four Stars
Next Film:  Thunderbirds