Young Justice Season 3 Review

  • Series Title: Young Justice – Outsiders
  • Season: 3
  • Episodes: 26
  • Discs: 4
  • Network: DC Universe (Warner Brothers)
  • Cast: Jesse McCartney, Danica McKellar, Nolan North, Khary Payton, Stephanie Lemelin, Zehra Fazal, Troy Baker, Jason Marsden, Greg Cipes, Alyson Stoner, Mae Whitman, Zeno Robinson, Tara Strong, Bryton James, Jason Spisak
  • DVD: Widescreen Blu-Ray (R1, NTSC)

Young Justice is an excellent series about the younger superheroes and protegees of the major heroes in the DC Universe – don’t call them sidekicks. The show had two popular and critically acclaimed seasons on Cartoon Network before being abruptly canceled because rumor said the show didn’t “sell enough toys”. Fans set out to bring the show back, and it finally arrived on DC Comics’ new streaming service DC Universe.

The new season is just as good as the previous ones – and gets back to the feel of the first season, with references to The Light, Vandal Savage, Darkseid, and even War World (which is now under the control of Savage). But many of the episodes concentrate on the characters – and what it means to be a teenager, especially a teen with superpowers. Starting in Markovia, where Nightwing hopes to break up a meta-trafficking ring including a lab to “activate” the metagene, the operation doesn’t go to plan. The King and Queen of Markovia who have opened the border to refugees from the rogue state of Qurac and announced an anti-trafficking initiative are murdered. Their second son agrees to have his metagene activated so he can protect Markovia. Their oldest son takes over but is under the control of his general – a conservative Xenophobe who wishes to exile the protected refugees and not only turns a blind eye to meta-human trafficking but was behind the lab in the first place (in collusion with Lex Luthor and the Light). The older brother exiles his younger brother. Also, their younger sister, Tara has been kidnapped and is still missing. She also is a meta. Brion, the younger brother, now a Meta, eventually using the code name Geo-Force, joins the team.

Next, the team of young heroes is contacted by Orion of the New Gods because something is happening on his home planet of New Genesis. The team discovers that someone is impersonating Orion and other New Gods and intimidating the “bugs” who live on the surface of New Genesis. Forager, one of these bugs helps the Young Justice team and joins them, in part because he can’t stay on New Genesis – it’s too dangerous.

Also, joining the team, a young girl, named Violet, whom one of the team sees dropped in a pit with other dead teenagers but she isn’t dead. It isn’t quite evident immediately what Violet’s powers are. She has a Halo around herself (thus her superhero name of “Halo”), can make shields and defensive weapons. She also cannot die, as her healing powers bring her back. Eventually, it’s discovered she is fused with a Motherbox from New Genesis and she can make Boom Tubes.

The season alters between episodes about the various characters – checking in on characters from previous seasons, and also developing the new characters. Violet’s character takes several episodes to develop – we know some things about her immediately, but not everything. Fred Bugg/Forager is a marvelous character and a bit more complicated than he seems at times. Prince Brion/Geo-Force spends a lot of time insisting the team find his missing sister, Tara, but when they do – it becomes very complicated since she’s under the abusive thumb of Slade Wilson. Brion is also exiled from his own country. This season also introduces Victor Stone – Cyborg, who is having a very hard time adjusting to his new identity. The season also opens with Batman withdrawing from the Justice League in protest to Lex Luthor’s restrictions on the League placed through his role as president of the United Nations. Batman takes several people with him to form “Batman Inc.” Jefferson Pierce, Black Lightning, retires at the same time after thinking he killed a teenager who had been turned into a Meta. Nightwing takes Black Lightning under his wing, no pun intended, and he joins the Team unofficially.

Batman Inc. isn’t really seen, but it’s clear they are manipulating events, behind the scenes to give the Young Justice team good publicity (which sometimes works and sometimes doesn’t) and to battle The Light and G Gordon Godfrey – a tabloid television journalist who’s a real pain.

Halfway through the season, once Tara is rescued and reunited with her brother, and Cyborg joins the team but is still learning how to control his powers that come from a Fatherbox, Beast Boy proposes a new direction for the Young Justice team. Calling themselves “Outsiders” – they are to generate good publicity for all metas, including young meta teens who have been rescued from meta trafficking and are being housed in the Justice League’s Teen Center. Beast Boy’s day job is playing “Commander Tork” on “Space Trek 3016” produced by GW Goode Studios run by Gretchen “Granny” Goode. Early in the season, the Young Justice team discovers the Virtual Reality goggles her company is producing are being used to tempt young potential meta children and teens away to be kidnapped by traffickers. Later, they discover “Gretchen” is none other than Granny Goodness from  Apokolips. Beast Boy is in charge of the positive image campaign and social media for the Outsiders.

At this point, there are multiple teams: the traditional Young Justice covert ops team, the Outsiders public PR team, and Batman’s Batman Inc. undercover team. It’s not clearly spelled out who is on what team, and there is overlap – but the show now has much more intrigue and covert operations feel to it, much like the first season. This doesn’t overshadow the character relationships though, which are really what makes Young Justice special. The series also has an extremely large cast, with pretty much any and all DC characters appearing at least once. The core for season three though is: Nightwing, Superboy, Tigress (Artemis Crock), Violet, Brion, and Forager, Beast Boy (Garfield Logan), Will Harper, Cyborg, M’Gann, El Dorado, Impulse (Bart Allen), Static, Wonder Girl, and Terra (Princess Tara).

I highly recommend Young Justice as a whole and Season 3 in particular. It is a series that is complex and multi-layered and you do need to watch each season in order to really catch everything that is happening and all the connections and characters. Seasons 1 and 2 are on my re-watch list at which point I will need to see this a second time. Highly recommended.

Thunderbirds Are Go Series 3 Vol. 1 Review

  • Series Title: Thunderbirds Are Go
  • Season: Series 3 Vol. 1
  • Episodes: 13
  • Discs: 2
  • Network: ITV
  • Cast: Rasmus Hardiker, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, David Menkin, Kayvan Novak, Rosamund Pike, David Graham, Sandra Dickinson, Angel Coulby
  • Format: Widescreen, Color, DVD (R2, PAL)

This review contains spoilers for Thunderbirds Are Go Series 3, Volume 1 (episodes 1-13).

Thunderbirds Are Go continues to be one of my favorites shows that I catch-up on via DVD (since I don’t have streaming access and I cannot watch it on Amazon Prime, the US distributor). The series is a worthy successor to the original Gerry Anderson Supermarionation series broadcast on ITV in the 1960s. The animated series uses CGI and model work. It is also incredibly fun – with plenty of action, characterization and memorable moments. It short, it’s enjoyable to watch, and one of the few shows I watch that I’d recommend for younger children as well as adults.

Series 3 kicks off right away by introducing the Choas Crew: Fuse and Havoc. They are out to cause, well, as much chaos as possible, and they have special equipment and vehicles in a similar manner to International Rescue. The Choas Crew is also working for the Hood. Unfortunately, as a season-long villain (or half-season I should say since once again the DVDs only include the first half of the season) the Choas Crew really has no motivation and there’s no good reason for their actions or their partnership with the Hood. Over the course of the season, we learn a little bit about the Choas Crew, but not enough to make them a truly interesting villain. The Mechanic is mentioned a few times, but not shown – both by the Hood, who wants to free him and use him again in his nefarious plans, and Brains, who wants to find a way to permanently free the Mechanic from the Hood’s control. Hopefully, when the second part of the season finally arrives on DVD, these threads will be wrapped up – the Choas Crew will be finally defeated and turned over to the GDF, and maybe the mentions of the Mechanic will have a purpose.

However, Thunderbirds Are Go Season 3 vol. 1 does have some great episodes and stories. Ned Tedford and Gladys the geranium show-up again. This time, the GDF has transferred him to the World Food Store to protect a repository of seeds that can be used to raise new plants in the case of a disaster. Of course, Ned has Gladys with him. When the Choas Crew attacks, International Rescue responds – but the Seed Store has its own defenses, including a deadly gas, and growth serum stores. Needless to say, Kayo, Ned, and the GDF’s Captain Rigby barely escape the gas (probably Halon or something similar) but poor Gladys gets hit with the growth serum! Still, Ned has carefully curated her seeds and cuttings and starts a new baby Gladys after losing his original plant. Even so, it was sad to see poor Gladys go – she and Ned have been through so much together!

“Night and Day” has Alan and John helping a mobile mining and storage crew on Mercury. Due to the extreme heat on the planet’s “day side” – their operation must continually move to stay in the dark. When an accident means they can’t move – it’s International Rescue to the, well, rescue. I liked this one very much – Alan was a bit more competent than the youngest Thunderbird pilot can sometimes be shown to be, and it was great to see John in a more action-oriented role, instead of simply managing communications on Thunderbird 5. Plus the rescue itself had some very intriguing aspects to it and the photography and animation were awesome!

In “Deep Water” – Gordon, Lady Penelope, and Parker have to rescue a mother and son who were checking on the Supreme Barrier Reef, a project to replace the destroyed Great Barrier Reef when their sub is destroyed by acidic water. Rescuing people quickly turns into trying to clean-up/stop an environmental disaster as Gordon and Lady Penelope must locate a leaky tanker and remove it from the Ocean Floor before the entire area is destroyed, including the new coral that’s started to grow beyond the Supreme Barrier Reef. The story is tense, has a great message (something unusual for this show) and the rescue and removal of the tanker is pretty cool.

Having given Gordon his own episode, Alan and Kayo get their own story in “Endgame”. Alan has been playing an online massive multiple player game called, “Cavern Quest”, but no one shares his interest or his enthusiasm for the new “Cavern Quest” theme park opening in a week. But when the Choas Crew attacks the park and an emergency call is sent out, Kayo is sent to respond, and Alan aids her virtually. Kayo meets Aezethril the Wizard, and real-life game designer, who is in trouble because the Choas Crew stole his wand before trapping him in the first cavern of the theme park. The wand controlled the actual holographic theme park, and without it, the only way out is through. Kayo and Aezethril must play through the game, stop the Choas Crew and their destruction of the park, and escape. Aezethril is voiced by Slyvester McCoy (of Doctor Who and The Hobbit)! Kayo chooses a sword as her weapon, Aezethril adds a hammer to his costume, and Alan holographically joins them. They play through the game, cavern by cavern, until reaching the final test. As silly as it sounds, I loved this one! The dynamics between Kayo, Alan, and Aezethril worked really well, and Sylvester definitely is enjoying himself!

The final story, “SOS” is another two-parter, like the opening one of the set, though the first part does have a definite end. The second-part makes up for the lack of a cliffhanger in the middle by ending on a cliff-hanger – and it’s a big one. The story itself involves the spaceship Calypso returning to Earth from its deep-space mission. And not only is it returning, but it is also about to crash into planet Earth. International Rescue must work together to rescue the crew, it’s data, and in part two – Braman. When the Choas Crew intervenes in Gordon’s ocean rescue/salvage operation, it’s Gordon who must soon be rescued by his brothers. Braman’s eventual rescue leads to a startling cliffhanger, as I mentioned.

I still recommend this series. The rescues are great. I love the interaction between the characters, regulars, reoccurring characters, and guests. I didn’t find Havoc and Fuse that interesting – their destruction vehicles seriously seemed solely designed to sell toys. But I still seriously love watching this show. And it’s good to see something positive, with the Tracy family (and their friends and associates) risking their own lives to rescue people in impossible situations, for no other reason than because someone has to, otherwise those people would surely die.

Read my review of Thunderbirds Are Go Series 1 Vol. 1.
Read my review of Thunderbirds Are Go Series 1 Vol. 2.
Read my review of Thunderbirds Are Go Series 2 Vol. 1.
Read my review of Thunderbirds Are Go Series 2 Vol. 2.

Star Trek: Discovery Season 2 Review

  • Series Title: Star Trek: Discovery
  • Season: 2
  • Episodes: 14
  • Discs: 4
  • Network: CBS (CBS All-Access)
  • Cast: Sonequa Martin-Green, Anson Mount, Doug Jones, Anthony Rapp, Mary Wiseman, Emily Coutts, Michelle Yeoh, Shazad Latif, Wilson Cruz, Mary Chieffo, Jayne Brook
  • DVD: Widescreen DVD (R1, NTSC)

The second season of Star Trek Discovery is very different from the first season, and much more like a traditional Star Trek series. Captain Christopher Pike is appointed the new captain of the Discovery, while the Enterprise is in spacedock for repairs. Seven strange “red signals” have appeared, signals which have some connection to Spock and Michael. Michael is Spock’s adopted sister, having been raised by Sarek and Amanda after the death of her parents. The Discovery follows the signals, also discovering the mystery of the “Red Angel” – a mysterious being that appears in times of crisis and seems to help.

Each episode of the series focuses on these two missions – the Red Angel and the signals. We also see Ash on the Klingon homeworld, but only briefly as for political reasons he is unable to remain as the Chancellor’s consort and he and their son go in hiding. L’Rell even claims she executed Ash and her baby to prove her loyalty to the Klingon Empire. The child is sent to a Klingon monastery. Later, Captain Pike will go to the monastery to obtain a Time crystal – and see a horrifying vision of his future as a result.

Suru has a health crisis, but when Discovery goes to his home planet, through complex means, it’s discovered that he is evolving into the advanced form of his species – a form largely without fear, and the planet’s apex predator which nearly wiped out the Ba’ul – the other species on the planet and the one that uses technology to cull the Kelpians. Suru helps his people to evolve.

Slowly Michael, Pike, and others solve the mystery of the Red Angel and of the signals. It does work as a series-long plot, with several interesting stops along the way. And Pike is an interesting captain, logical, calm, focused, and driven. He doesn’t rely too much on his instinct (Like Kirk), but he’s colder than Picard. And Pike has an inclusive style of leadership that brings takes into consideration the opinions of others on his staff, without more formal command staff meetings.

Section 31 again rears its head and proves to be very much the villain of the season.

Overall, I preferred Season 1 of Star Trek Discovery – it had some real surprises and pulled no punches in showing the compromises that happen when the Federation is at war. Season 2 isn’t bad, but it’s much more predictable and feels very much like traditional Star Trek, with traditional storylines and characters. Whereas in Season 1, Michael was the point of view character but she was flawed, and the season was very much about her learning things and changing her viewpoint, in Season 2 she’s very much a Mary Sue – everything revolves around her, and considering her still rather low rank, she spends too much time telling her captain what to do. She’s also become much less flawed, which is a problem. I will say though, I really liked the actor playing Spock – once they got him back from a Section 31 prison (it’s complicated). I also liked Pike – he’s a bit cold, but he fits with his crew.

Overall, recommended. If you watched only a few episodes of Season 1 of Star Trek: Discovery and thought it “really wasn’t Star Trek“, Season 2 is probably much more to your liking. There also isn’t much overlap between Season 1 and 2, so it’s perfectly possible to start with the second season without being extremely lost.

Read my Review of Season 1 of Star Trek Discovery.

 

The Handmaid’s Tale Season 3 Review

  • Series Title: The Handmaid’s Tale
  • Season: 3
  • Episodes: 13
  • Discs: 4 (Blu-Ray)
  • Cast: Elisabeth Moss, Yvonne Strahovski, Amanda Brugel, Ann Dowd, Joseph Fiennes, Madeline Brewer, Alexis Bledel
  • Original Network: Hulu
  • Original Production Company: MGM

This review contains spoilers for Season 3 of The Handmaid’s Tale.

At the end of the previous season, June gives her baby to Emily and sends her off to escape Gilead, while she remains behind. Season 3 opens with Emily and the baby continuing their escape and successfully obtaining asylum and refugee status in Canada. Emily brings the baby to Luke and Moira, and after a period of adjustment living with them, she locates her wife and son. By the end of the season, she’s returned to her profession as a doctor.

In Gilead, June returns to the house of Commander Lawrence, where she discovers he’s a psychopathic game-player and his wife is ill and not always able to get the medications she needs due to the laws and rules of Gilead. June is determined to see her daughter, Hannah, and try to get her out. She also has a young walking partner, who constantly repeats the Gilead Party Line. June doesn’t pay as much attention to this as she should. Finally, a plan is made for June to see Hannah at her School for the Domestic Arts, using Mrs. Lawrence as a cover. It doesn’t work – and soon after Hannah and her Commander and his wife are moved again. Not only that, but the entire household – Martha, Handmaid, even Guardian are executed by Gilead, with the Handmaids literally pulling the ropes to hang them.

June’s walking partner gets pregnant but doesn’t immediately reveal it to her Commander. Aunt Lydia has June publically shamed. June fights back by claiming her walking partner doesn’t want her baby – and the girl is publically shamed by Lydia. A few episodes later, in a sequence without much explanation, the girl goes crazy and starts firing a gun in the market. She is shot down by a Guardian in front of Lydia and June. The woman is taken to a hospital and put on life support until her child is developed enough to be removed by Cesarian section, then she is allowed to die. Aunt Lydia forces June to remain in the room, on her knees. June slips into a deep depression and altered status. She even takes a used scalpel from the sharps container and attacks Serena when she visits, as well as harming herself. The doctor examines the cut and asks her how long she’s been suicidal. At first, June insists she isn’t but realizes that she is – and that she has been since she realized she’d probably never see her daughter again.

Now back at the Commander’s house, June gets access to records of Handmaids and their children. She finds out Janine had a son that was taken from her by Gilead, only for that child to be killed in a traffic accident. All of the Handmaids we know through June have also lost children. June has an epiphany and changes her focus. Instead of focusing on her daughter only, she decides she’s going to get children out. Any child. As many as she can. When she talks to the Martha network about this – she gets an incredible amount of support, more than she could possibly have expected. By focusing on others, on her fellow Handmaids and their children, June grows and also gets help, whereas before the Handmaids and Marthas were getting tired of her selfishness. June works on getting help from Commander Lawrence by promising to take his wife with her to escape to someplace she can get the medical help she needs.

The second half of the season focuses on June and the Martha Network trying to set up this escape. There are setbacks, but June’s determination wins the day. She returns to Jezebel’s to convince the bartender there to help the Handmaids. They know he brings in regular shipments by plane of contraband, so June wants to use the plane as an escape route for 52 children. Billy seems uncommitted, but as she’s leaving June is spotted by the Washington DC Commander of Gilead who forces her to an upstairs room and tries to brutally rape her. June kills him but then shuts down in shock. A Martha finds her, one she had chosen to be saved from The Colonies. The Martha helps June get out of Jezebel’s and she and her fellow Marthas burn the Commander’s body and clean-up the mess. No one in authority ever realizes he’s dead, they just think he’s missing. Meanwhile, Serena becomes more and more determined to get her daughter, Nichole, back from the Canadians. This had resulted in the Waterfords, Aunt Lydia, and June taking a trip to Washington DC where Haidmaids cannot even speak, their lips are sealed together with metal rings. But Serena realizes that despite her husband’s assurances – he has no intention of actually getting Nichole back. Serena works with an American spy to get herself and Commander Waterford to Canada to face war crimes accusations. Serena gets immunity by testifying against Waterford. So now, the Waterfords are in Canada facing war crimes charges (Serena is charged with separate crimes later on), and the Commander they met in DC is dead. Furthermore, Billy decides to help the Marthas and Mayday is a go – June and company will rescue the children. As her new Martha tells her – she is “fucking fantastic”.

The details of the plan have a few setbacks, especially when a Martha brings a child to the house, gets cold feet, and decides to return to her mistress. But the younger Martha in Commander Lawrence’s house, Sienna, points out that because they don’t have any transport that they can go through the woods to get to the airport – it’s shorter. The route also proves to be safer, with less chance of getting spotted. They reach the border of the airport only to face fences and guardians on the lookout. June decides she will create a diversion while the Marthas find a safer way to get to the actual plane. Handmaids and Marthas return and help with the diversion – throwing rocks at the Guardians. It’s women armed with rocks versus men in black with machine guns, but the women actually do okay, definitely providing the needed distraction, even though some are shot and injured. June further leads a Guardian into the woods – he shoots her, but she gets him, at gunpoint, to call in the all-clear before she shoots him dead, then collapses. The plane, with the children, escapes. Later the plane lands in Canada and Moira and Emily are leading the refugee aid. Luke looks on in hope to see June. Rita tells Moira that June did all this – pointing to the rescued children.

Back in Gilead, six Handmaids find June and carry her off. June is injured but alive.

Going into Season 3, I was expecting to see June meeting with the Resistance and becoming a Harriet Tubman of Gilead – leading others out but staying herself to continue to help the Resistance. It takes June about half a season to come to that realization. She does help the Resistance throughout, using Commander Lawrence’s house as a safe place. One woman she smuggles through she’s told isn’t going out – she’s going deeper in, as a chemist, she can make bombs to be used by the Resistance. This knowledge is part of June’s journey to becoming a leader, not simply another victim. Her Epiphany after kneeling, for months, watching a woman as a human incubator (a metaphor for how all Handmaids are treated in Gilead) is the second step in her journey. Seeing how much help she is offered when she becomes determined to save others, strangers, children but strangers she doesn’t know is the final step. June has gone from being fundamentally selfish and getting others killed to becoming a Resistance leader who saves lives. I cannot wait to see what she does in the next season!

I highly recommend The Handmaid’s Tale. From the premise, it might seem like it would be depressing, difficult to watch, or angering – and it is, but it is also hopeful and just a really well-told story. The acting, cinematography, and stories are excellent.

Read my Review of The Handmaid’s Tale Season 1.
Read my Review of The Handmaid’s Tale Season 2.

Legends of Tomorrow Season 4 Review

  • Series Title: Legends of Tomorrow
  • Season: Season 4
  • Episodes: 16
  • Discs: 2 (Blu-Ray) (DVD set is 3 discs)
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: Caity Lotz, Brandon Routh, Maise Richardson-Sellers, Dominic Purcell, Nick Zano, Tala Ashe, Matt Ryan, Jes Macallen, Adam Tsekhman
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

This review will contain spoilers for Season 4 of Legends of Tomorrow

As the tease at the end of Season 3 promised, Season 4 brings magic into the Legends of Tomorrow universe and John Constantine becomes a regular. The first half of the season has relatively self-contained episodes, as the Legends chase magical creatures before they can mess-up the timeline. These episodes though are so very character-centric and each one allows our characters to shine. In the third episode of Season 4, the Legends meet a punk shapeshifter in 1970s London. Although Constantine wants to send the creature to hell, as he had previous magical creatures they had met, Ray Palmer, who has gotten to know Charlie, convinces the Legends to capture her instead. First imprisoned by the Legends, Charlie eventually becomes one of them, assisting on the current mission. She also looks like Amaya.

The two-part midseason finale, “Hell No, Dolly!” and “Legends of To-Meow-Meow” gives us more information on Constantine, including explaining why he’s been in a weird headspace all season and introduces the season’s villain, a demon called Neron, who bonded with Constantine’s lover Des (Desmond) forcing Constantine to send them both to hell. Being in the same city at the same time that he lost his lover, Constantine cannot resist trying to change things and save Des. But when he does he breaks time. He and Charlie, who helped run interference while he was on his unsanctioned solo mission, return to the jump ship and find Zari’s been turned into a cat.  In “Legends of To-Meow-Meow” Constantine, Charlie, and Zari with help from Nora and Mona attempt to find a solution that will allow them to save Des, allow Charlie to keep her shapeshifting powers, but that won’t have the Legends die – because in this new broken universe, members of the Legends team keep dying in magical creature attacks. These losses cause the Legends to become reckless killers. Although the episode expresses this with various genre-style “TV series”, complete with credit sequences, including, “Guardians of the Chronology” (an 1980s-style, all male-led, action show with lots of guns and violence), “Sirens of Spacetime” (in “Charlie’s Angels” style – Sara, Ava, and Gideon are action stars) and “Puppets of Tomorrow” (the Legends have been turned into singing puppets). But the only way to prevent disaster is to prevent John from changing time in the first place.

The second half of the season features more magic, Mona becomes a regular – despite being essentially a werewolf, and Nora Darhk also, through her friendship with Ray Palmer, joins the crew. It’s not a straight or easy transition for either Nora or Mona. Mona starts as the girl who delivers food to the bureau (and is continuously mind-wiped by Gary) to the creature keeper to falling for a Kaupe named Konané to being scratched/bit by Konané and becoming a Kaupe herself. Mona’s journey includes learning both to control and embrace “Wolfie” – her werewolf side. Nora had escaped the time bureau using the time stone Ray gave her, but when John Constantine goes too far to save a young camper – only Nora can save him. Ray finds her and Nora learns she can use and control her power without becoming evil. She too joins the Legends but is still considered a fugitive.

Throughout the season Nate is mostly based at the Time Bureau, which leads to some interesting confrontations with his father. Henry Haywood seems to behind a plot to torture the captured magical creatures. Too late, Nate, John and the others discover Henry had made a bargain with the demon Neron for funding. When Henry tries to reject the demon, Neron kills him. Nora, a captive herself, feels Neron’s attack but when she tries to stop it, she’s caught and accused, of course, of killing Henry. Fortunately, Ray, Nate, and John believe her when she says she didn’t do it. John discovers Neron’s kidnapped Ava to be a new vessel for his “Tabitha”. John sends Sara to Ava’s personal purgatory to rescue her. It proves to be a test (and a successful one) of their relationship, which has suffered a few setbacks due to the Legends “harboring” Charlie and Nora.

Mona, Zari, Sara, and Charlie end-up solving a magical alert when Jane Austin’s books disappear. Mona not only meets her favorite author, but Zari confronts the Hindu god of love who is causing chaos. Mona is initially upset with Jane’s practical advice on love (marrying for security not love) but when she “wolfs out” and confronts Jane again, Jane is more honest, telling her not only she does believe in love, but that she rejected her only marriage prospect because she didn’t love or respect him. She then says that she and her sister will be penniless. Mona assures her she will publish her writing and it will be timeless, and she is her favorite author. Jane helps Mona to embrace Wolfie. Meanwhile, Zari is nearly talked into marriage by the Hindu god, leading to a fabulous Bollywood-style musical number. The Legends prevent her from making a mistake and free the young man who is being possessed. The unexpected musical number is wonderful!

The rest of the season focuses on finding a way to stop Neron, someone Constantine has failed to stop once. Ray, unfortunately, gets possessed by Neron, and starts a campaign to raise fear and paranoia – he even introduces a new app to report monster sightings. The app’s terms of service include the statement that “in return for using this service the user signs over their eternal soul to the demon Neron”. Neron is gathering souls to confront the Triumvirate that rules Hell. Also, by owning people and stirring up fear, hatred, and paranoia, he makes the atmosphere ripe for all sorts of trouble. When he doesn’t get enough downloads he arranges a “monster attack” during congressional hearings into monsters. Zari remarks that this is how her dystopia started – then they passed the anti-meta act and soon after ARGUS took total control. She and her family were forced to move to a ghetto (restricted living) and later her brother and family were killed – all because of their religion (Muslim). But Nate also discovers his father’s plan wasn’t to “out” magical creatures, or to turn them into weapons, but to capture and train them for a magical theme park called HeyWorld. Zari discovers that if the Legends are able to successfully start HeyWorld and get people to believe magic is well, magical and wonderful, she can save her family and change the future. But she has to stay on the ship in the temporal zone or she’ll lose her memories if time changes.

Constantine finds out that Ray made a bargain to let Neron take him over if Neron didn’t kill Nate. Nate is willing to sacrifice himself – if that’s the only way to stop Neron. The Legends have Mick Rory, now an accomplished romance writer (a thread slowly introduced in season 3), create HeyWorld using the journal of Bridget that creates whatever a writer can imagine. But they still have to convince people that magical creatures are magical and wonderful, not dangerous and evil. Sara, Nate, and Gary try a stage show that is bombing badly (while the Monitor sits in the stands, munching popcorn). But when Tabitha (the fairy godmother), and Constantine (returned from Hell) arrive it becomes more of a confrontation. Nate and Charlie switch places, tricking Neron into “killing” Nate. Zari arrives when she sees that it’s Nate who died. Neron’s hold over Ray is broken and he’s sent back to hell. Zari gets everyone to sing Henry Heywood’s favorite song to revive Nate. But, although the timeline is now safe, and Zari’s dystopia is erased, she is replaced by her brother who is now the air totem bearer. Nate doesn’t seem to remember Zari. In Hell, Astra cashes in the soul coins she stole from Neron’s vault (where Constantine and Nora went in search of Ray’s coin) – in a set-up for next season.

Although not quite as surprisingly wonderful and marvelous as the season finale for Season 3, Season 4 still has a fun finale. I loved the “looking for magic” theme that developed from “magical creatures are evil – send them to hell” to “OK, some magical creatures are all right” to “let’s live in concert and happiness with magical creatures”. And the singing scene was similar to saving Tinkerbell by clapping in Peter Pan. But while the sing-along is going on, Nate has a much-needed final conversation with his father, Hank.

We also get some wonderful girl power this season – Legends has gone from Sara being the only female member of the crew (albeit the captain) to having four members: Sara, Zari, Charlie, and Mona – plus regular appearances by Ava and occasional ones by Gideon as more than just a computer voice. Because the cast, in general, has gotten so large (the guys include Mick, John, Nate, Ray, and Gary) many of the episodes have two or three plots with the crew being split into groups. (Such as the wonderful, “The Eggplant, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” – where Nate and Zari go on a date in the 1930s and find a dragon egg, Ray figures out Nora didn’t kill Hank, and Sara has to save Ava from Purgatory.) This allows the women to shine and work together, while at the same time gives everyone something to do. Even “quarterbacking” from the Waverider isn’t a way to shove a character aside for a story or two. And Sirens of Spacetime – starring Gideon, Ava, and Sara – I just love it!

I highly recommend Legends of Tomorrow, especially seasons 3 and 4 – the show just gets more original and more magical every season and its tons of fun to watch. Because the Legends were not involved in this season’s crossover it is not included on the Blu-Ray or DVD set.

Read my Review of Legends of Tomorrow Season 1.
Read my Review of Legends of Tomorrow Season 2.
Read my Review of Legends of Tomorrow Season 3.

Crisis on Earth-X Review

  • Series: The Flash, Arrow, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow
  • Third Arrowverse Crossover Special: Crisis on Earth-X
  • Episodes: 4
  • Discs: 1
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Stephen Amell, Melissa Benoist, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Emily Bett Rickards, Victor Garber, Caity Lotz, Chyler Leigh, Franz Drameh, Paul Blackthorne, Jeremy Jordan, Wentworth Miller, Russell Tovey
  • Network: CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

Barry and Supergirl arrive, and a few moments later Green Arrow pulls up on a motorcycle, “Just a quick reminder, super speed – I don’t have it.” – Oliver Queen, the Green Arrow

“My grandparents didn’t survive the Holocaust so the world could be ruled by Nazis. So if you want Kara, you gotta’ go through me and even if you do, you’re not going to win. Because we will not back down, we will keep fighting. So get the hell off our Earth while you still can.” – Felicity.

Just like DC Comics occasionally does crossovers between two or more books, and all their characters live in the same “universe”, from the very beginning all the “Arrowverse” shows have been clearly in the same universe, and even though Kara Danvers (Supergirl) is on another Earth, she has met Barry Allen (the Flash) and company before, and the characters from Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow in the previous crossover, “Invasion”. “Crisis on Earth-X” starts innocently enough, with all our characters gathered together for Barry and Iris’s wedding. But just as their minister gets to the part about, “Does anyone object to the marriage of this couple?” Nazis burst in and a huge fight erupts. All of our heroes use their powers to fight off the Nazis, despite being dressed for a wedding. It’s total chaos.

Dr. Harry Wells explains that there is a 53rd Earth, beyond the known 52 Earths of the Multiverse. It’s a place so awful, it’s only known as Earth-X because no one would want to travel there. It’s the Earth where the Nazis won World War II. To make matters worse, in this version, Oliver’s doppelganger is the current führer of the Nazi-world and his wife is Overgirl, an evil Nazi version of Supergirl. First, evil Oliver and Evil Supergirl and their soldiers break into a lab and steal a prism, and then they come after Supergirl. Their plan? Well, Overgirl is dying after being exposed to too much sunlight so they’ve come to Earth One to kill Supergirl, take her heart, and implant it in Overgirl – because Supergirl would be the perfect donor. The Nazis manage to take over Star Labs and send half of our large group of Heroes to Earth-X and the rest are locked up in the pipeline. They miss Felicity and Iris though, who manage to be badass in trying to rescue everyone. Felicity and Iris also send a distress call to the Legends.

On Earth-X, Oliver, Barry, Alex Danvers, and company are locked in a cage with others in black and white striped convict clothes, with badges pinned to their chests. They meet Ray, and when Jax asks what he “did wrong” to be locked up, Ray responds, “I loved the wrong person”. Alex and Sara, who shared a one night stand the night before the ill-fated wedding, look knowingly at each other. The doppelganger of Captain Lance arrives and separates out our heroes and Ray, and leads them to a trench, they are told to stand on the edge, and a firing squad is readied. But at the last minute, Leonard Snart (“Leo”) arrives and rescues them all. They are taken to the base camp of the Freedom Fighters and meet General Winn Schott. The good – they are now in with a group that’s organized to fight and overthrow the Nazis. The bad? Their main plan is to destroy the Nazis’ new doomsday weapon, which happens to be housed with the interworld transport terminal that’s the only way for the Legends to get home. They also discover Ray is actually from Earth 1 and he and Leo are partners.

On Earth-X, the heroes need to convince Winn to give them a shot at getting to the portal before Winn uses a secret weapon of his own to blow it up. Meanwhile, on Earth One, Iris and Felicity are trying to get Cisco and anyone else locked in the Pipeline free, and stop Reverse Flash (who is in league with Evil Oliver and Overgirl) from killing Supergirl. They delay the operation that would kill Kara by turning off the power. When Felicity is caught, she tries to stand up to Thawne, but he threatens to kill her, and she gives up the encryption code for getting the power on. Thawne again ties Kara down under Red Light lamps to weaken her, but just as he’s about to cut her open, Ray, the Atom, stops him. The rest of the Legends – The Atom, Amaya, Zari, and Nate have arrived. They get everyone out of the Pipeline and rescue Kara. Everyone else returns from Earth-X, but Martin was shot during the mission to get to the inter-Earth Gateway. Martin Stein is dying, and because he is linked with Jefferson, he is dying also. Cisco, however, had designed, with help from Caitlin, a serum that would safely separate Martin and Jefferson but at the cost of the loss of their powers. Martin takes the serum as he lies dying in the Waverider’s med bay, to save Jefferson.

Even though everyone has returned to Earth One safely, except for Martin, and they’ve rescued Kara. Reverse-Flash is still determined to use their Nazi Waverider to launch an invasion of Earth One and Evil Oliver is still determined to kill Supergirl to save Overgirl. They also discover that not only will Overgirl’s overexposure to sunlight kill her, but she’s a living bomb who will explode with the power of a neutron bomb. Part four largely consists of major fight scenes, and a money shot of all the heroes, in costume, just all-out fighting back against a troop of black and red uniformed Nazis. Nazis who have just stormed a city block, randomly killing anyone they come across. Everyone has their part in the fight. Iris and our Wells are on the Waverider fighting the Nazi one but can’t get through their shields. Supergirl teases Overgirl out to fight, and Overgirl breaks through a window in her own ship, this allows Killer Frost, Amaya and Zari access into the ship to fight Nazis, take it over, and then lower the shields. Vibe arrives to transport them off just in time before the ship is destroyed by the Waverider’s missiles. Kara takes Overgirl Up, Up, and Away, so she can safely explode. Evil Oliver is devastated by the loss of his wife. Oliver kills his evil doppelganger.

Our heroes clean up against the Nazis and exile them back to Earth-X. Everyone attends Martin’s funeral, then one by one, or in small groups, they head back to their own homes. The Ray returns to Earth-X, but Snart decides to stay on Earth One for a short time. Barry brings Diggle to a lakeside park and he marries not only Iris and Barry but Felicity and Oliver.

On the one hand, “Crisis on Earth-X” has some very satisfying moments – superheroes and their human non-powered companions punching Nazis and being badass (especially Iris, Felicity, Alex, and Sara all get to have some great moments. When they finally arrive, Zari and Amaya aren’t left out of the girl power fun.) But the entire crossover is fight-heavy and at times plot light. There is some horrific imagery, but also moments of pure power and generosity such as our Oliver breaking his impersonation of his evil self to save the Earth-X Felicity and Felicity herself standing up to the Nazis that invade Star Labs. Evil Oliver though has an almost understandable goal – to save his wife, whom he clearly loves – Overgirl. Still, his plan, to kill Kara to save Overgirl is horrific. And one has to wonder how he knew to find Supergirl on Earth One since she normally lives on Earth 38. Also, once most of our characters are on Earth-X, their one mission is to return home. General Winn Schott is incredibly stubborn about wanting to destroy the inter-Earth portal before everyone can return home. And Flash and the Ray end up destroying his weapon, which turns out to be Red Tornado, so you have to wonder what that did to Schott’s resistance. But overall, considering the logistics of having so many characters, even in a four-hour special, and giving all of them screen time and stories, the crossover works. I also really, really liked The Ray (Russell Tovey of the original British Being Human) and cuddly Leonard Snart (Wentworth Miller).

Note: Over-exposure to sunlight giving Superman cancer, or at least a sort of cancer, is the plot of All-Star Superman.

Note 2: The first episode opens with a brief preview of Earth-X, which has red skies and yellow lightning, a reference perhaps to the future Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Note 3: Crisis on Earth-X, all four parts, is included in full on the Blu-Ray edition of Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow. The individual DVD box sets of Arrow (Season 6), Supergirl (Season 3), The Flash (Season 4), and Legends (Season 3), on the other hand, only include their individual episode of the crossover.

No Offense Series 1 Review

  • Series Title: No Offense
  • Season: 1
  • Episodes: 8
  • Discs: 3
  • Network: ITV
  • Cast: Joanna Scanlan, Elaine Cassidy, Alexandra Roach, Will Mellor, Colin Salmon
  • DVD: Widescreen DVD (R1, NTSC)

Set in Manchester in the UK, No Offense at first seems to be your typical British procedural cop show, good, but not great. However, as the show builds its characters and plot it develops into something different and enjoyable, though as with all procedurals, at times the show can be violent. During the first episode, DI Viv Deering’s squad realizes that they may have a serial murder on their hands. A young woman is kidnapped and after the previous deaths of two young women with Down’s Syndrome, they think they have a third. When it turns out the young woman doesn’t have Down’s Syndrome but was in a severe accident and her nose was packed with gauze and her eyes swollen, they think it could be the same person. The hunt is on to save Cathy before she is killed. The squad manages to rescue her, but she’s a street kid who will go into foster care. Dinah, one of the officers, feels sorry for Cathy and decides to take her in.

Each episode of No Offense has our officers solving one case, but continuing to work on the serial murder case – at first their DSI (Viv’s boss) doesn’t believe it’s a serial case, because Cathy doesn’t have Down’s Syndrome – but Deering and Dinah point out that at night, in the rain, with her eyes and nose swollen, it was probably a case of mistaken identity. When another Down’s Syndrome girl goes missing, the serial murder case is confirmed. At first DSI Maclaren assigns it to someone else, but DI Viv Deering and her crew get it back. In each episode, as they work on and solve other cases, they also make progress and have setbacks in the main case – the serial murders.

The season develops, and also develops the characters, becoming an intriguing mix of short cases, long-form mystery, and development of flawed but dedicated detectives – including unconventional and hard as nails DI Viv Deering, her new sergeant DS Joy Freers, and detective Dinah Kowalska, who is now caring for Cathy. Traumatized by her experience, Cathy cannot remember the details of who took her, including what he looked like. She works with a female forensic psychologist to try to restore her memories. The gradual recovery of her memory and the clues the police team discover leads to solving the case, but not before another Down’s Syndrome girl dies. However, when the killer is caught, Cathy realizes he wasn’t acting alone, and it was his partner who raped her.

This fact creates a brand new wrinkle in the case. DI Deering also realizes that someone in her department is leaking information to the killer, intentionally or not. She and Dinah launch a secret investigation into their own department, even including DSI Maclaren in their suspects. This is a bad decision with huge consequences for everyone. Eventually, DI Deering discovers this mole is much closer to her than she realizes and she’s faced with some serious questions.

I don’t want to spoil the ending of the season, but this is not, after all, just another typical police procedural. I highly recommend it, especially if you like complex mysteries with quirky yet real characters.