Book Review – Doctor Who: The Road to the Thirteenth Doctor

  • Title: Doctor Who: The Road to the Thirteenth Doctor
  • Authors: James Peaty, Jody Houser
  • Artists: Iolanda Zanfardino, Pasquale Qualano, Brian Williamson, Dijjo Lima (Colorist), Rachael Stott (Artist), Enrica Eren Angiolini (Colorist), Richard Starkings (Letterer), Jimmy Betancourt (Letterer)
  • Line:  13th Doctor Prequel
  • Characters: Tenth Doctor, Eleventh Doctor, Twelfth Doctor, Gabby Gonzalez, Cindy Wu, Alice Abiefune, Bill Potts
  • Collection Date: 2019
  • Publisher: Titan Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 05/20/2019

**Spoiler Alert** The Road to the Thirteenth Doctor consists of three short stories, one each with the Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Doctors and some interstitial pages which directly lead into the first Thirteenth Doctor graphic novel. The graphic novel is also published by Titan Comics who publish a number of tie-in graphic novels to the British Doctor Who television series produced by the BBC.

The first story features the Tenth Doctor, as played on the television series by David Tennant, and his companions Gabby Gonzales and Cindy Wu. The TARDIS lands on a spaceship and the crew step outside only to have a man run right into the TARDIS exterior walls. He yells, “You idiots, you’ve killed me,” only to have a ghostly figure zap the man and kill him. The other crew on the spaceship arrive and take the Doctor and his companions to the control center of the ship. The Doctor tells them he’s with Earthcorp Rescue and finds out the ship is a “ghost ship”, a retired ship put back in service after budget cuts. The Doctor finds this unlikely as their “mission” is to explore an already explored and mapped galaxy. The Doctor is quickly proven right as one of the crew attacks the remaining members and the ghostly figures return and attack. It turns out the ship is on a weapons test. The weapon takes a person’s “aura” and turns it against them to kill that person. Earthcorp plans on using it to kill the indigenous species on planets they want to colonize. The Doctor heads off to the ship’s engine room to stop the weapon, while Gabby and Cindy take the remaining living crew member, Capt. Kelly, to the TARDIS. The Doctor is able to shut down the weapon, and then he returns her to Earth in the TARDIS. Captain Kelly vows to change Earthcorp’s ways.

The Eleventh Doctor and Alice land the TARDIS in 19th Century San Francisco, but the town is filled with anachronistic robots. The Doctor and Alice investigate and find a robot butler at a home – which is startled and kills its owner. The police arrive and the Doctor, the police officer, and Alice take the TARDIS to the harbor. But then the police officer also turns out to be a robot. The Doctor investigates the man who introduced the robots to San Francisco, but the battle drone robots kill him before the Doctor can find out much. The Doctor and Alice are confronted with the robot leader, who is mildly more intelligent than the robots. The Doctor manages to disable the spaceship that controls the robots and they become harmless. He and Alice leave.

The Twelfth Doctor and Bill Potts are in the TARDIS when the Doctor receives a message from Kate Stewart. He arrives in London and sees the city is filled with strange creatures. Kate barely has time to talk to the Doctor before there’s another attack and she’s frozen in time. But the Doctor has an inkling of what’s going on. He soon confronts the Kar-yn, species that had the ability to turn dreams into reality, but when their planet arrived at the end of its lifecycle, they sought to extend their lifespan by creating a memetic archive. A young man on Earth found the archive and activated it. The Doctor confronts the Kar-yn, telling them that instead of preserving their culture they only preserved the death of their planet – a death they were now bringing to Earth. This reverses the Kar-yn’s strategy and saves Earth and London. The young man who found the archive is trapped in his own dream world, a diner where he meets a waitress named Karen.

The interstitial pages consist of a hand reaching out of some type of portal for help, but the Tenth and Twelfth Doctor both fail to grab the hand. The Eleventh Doctor doesn’t even notice the hand or the portal. This mystery will be solved in the next graphic novel, the first to feature the Thirteenth Doctor.

I enjoyed this short graphic novel. All three short stories were good. Recommended.

Advertisements

Book Review – Doctor Who: The Lost Dimension Book Two

  • Title: Doctor Who The Lost Dimension Book Two
  • Authors: Gordon Rennie, Emma Beeby, George Mann, Cavan Scott
  • Artists: Ivan Rodriguez, Wellington Diaz, Rachael Stott, Mariano LaClaustra, Anderson Cabral, Marcelo Salaza, Fer Centurion, Thiago Ribeiro, Mauricio Wallace, Carlos Cabrera, Rod Fernandes, Mony Castillo, Richard Starkings, Jimmy Betancourt
  • Line:  All-Doctors Crossover Special
  • Characters: Fourth Doctor, Eighth Doctor, Ninth Doctor, Tenth Doctor, Eleventh Doctor, Twelfth Doctor, Romana II, Rose, Gabby, Cindy, Alice, Nardol, Bill, Cameos by other Doctors and Companions
  • Collection Date: 2018
  • Publisher: Titan Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 03/27/2019

Titan Comics’ The Lost Dimension Book Two is the second volume in this series, which concludes the story. This volume opens with the Fourth Doctor as played on the BBC series Doctor Who by Tom Baker and Romana II in the TARDIS, but instead of materializing the TARDIS is caught between two transmat beams. When the Doctor and Romana exit the TARDIS they are confronted with Krotons, from the Second Doctor story, “The Krotons”, but these Krotons are considerably more dangerous. The other ship is crewed by Quarks from the Second Doctor story, “The Dominators”. Soon a spaceship appears from the Ogron Confederation of Planets and tries to take over. The Doctor soon realises that all of these new invaders are from other universes, universes without the Daleks. He and Romana manage to escape in the TARDIS after convincing the new invaders to leave the universe with the Daleks in it.

Meanwhile, Dr. River Song and her graduate student discover a lost colony of Silurians who are about to be destroyed by an asteroid crashing into their planetoid. Things do not go well.

The Ninth, Tenth, and Twelfth Doctors meet up in Australia while investigating the infection that turns humans into automatons saying, “peace”. They realize the Doctors TARDISes are all linked and that several versions of the Doctor have already been lost in the white void universe. The Eighth Doctor also arrives. The Ninth, Tenth and Twelfth Doctor use Jenny’s Bowship to investigate the White Void that is taking over everything. The Eighth Doctor stays behind to try to protect the humans on Earth from the infection of the Void. The three Doctors in the bow ship find at the center of the Void, an ancient TT capsule, and the Eleventh Doctor. The time capsule is eating everything in sight, consuming whole galaxies. The three Doctors are able to talk to the Eleventh Doctor, who needs help. Together the Doctors manage to fix things for the Time Capsule (ancient TARDIS) and reverse the damage. Everyone is then safe and able to go home.

The Lost Dimension Book Two is a good conclusion to the story. Book One had introduced the Eleventh Doctor’s journey to Gallifrey, and Book Two focuses on solving that mystery and concluding the story. Book Two also has more Doctors working together, with a minimum of the various aspects of the Doctors sniping at each other. Other than the Fourth Doctor and the Eighth Doctor, though, the Classic Doctors are still only seen in cameos, although having all the Doctors working together to rescue the Eleventh Doctor and reverse the damage caused by the TT Capsule works and makes this seem like a true multi-Doctor story. I enjoyed this graphic novel, though I did find it extremely confusing at times and I had to read it multiple times to really figure out what was going on. Still, recommended.

Read my Review of Doctor Who – The Lost Dimension Book One.

Book Review – Doctor Who: The Lost Dimension Book One

  • Title: Doctor Who The Lost Dimension Book One
  • Authors: George Mann, Cavan Scott, Nick Abadzis
  • Artists: Rachael Stott, Adriana Melo, Cris Bolson, Mariano LaClaustra, Carlos Cabrera, Leandro Casco, INJ Culbard, Rod Fernandes, Marco Lesko, Dijjo Lima, Hernan Cabrera, IHQ Studios, Richard Starkings and Jimmy Betancourt
  • Line:  All-Doctors Crossover Special
  • Characters: Ninth Doctor, Tenth Doctor, Eleventh Doctor, Twelfth Doctor, Rose, Gabby, Cindy, Alice, Nardol, Bill, Cameos by other Doctors and Companions
  • Collection Date: 2018
  • Publisher: Titan Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 03/24/2019

The Lost Dimension is Titan Comics attempt to do a crossover story with all the Doctors both from the Classic Series and New Who. However, even at two volumes (second volume to be reviewed separately), it doesn’t work as well as it should. The stories end up being more vignettes than a single, coherent story, and at times stories aren’t even told in order, which is confusing – even after multiple reads. Jenny’s story is particularly told backward: first, we see her trying to save Captain Jack and Tara who have arrived on a planet that is full of volcanic activity and very dangerous. But Jenny is unable to rescue them and is sucked into a white void. She’s pushed out of the void by the Fifth Doctor’s TARDIS which is sucked into the void in her place. Jenny’s ship is damaged. But the next thing we see in the book is Jenny crashing into the Terrance Dicks library on Earth – in a different ship. Later, we learn what happened to Jenny after she was freed from the Void and how she got her Time Lord Bow Ship, which subsequently crashed into the library. The story would have been stronger if it had been told in order.

There are other vignettes – the Twelfth Doctor is there with Bill when Jenny crashes her ship into the library. Kate Stewart arrives with Osgood to slap a D-notice on the incident. But some sort of radiation affects Osgood and everyone else, so they are all saying, “Peace”.

The Ninth Doctor and Rose arrive on a pirate ship, captained by Vastra and Jenny. The ship crashes into an island hidden by a perception filter. It’s home to a colony of Silurians, but unfortunately for Vastra, these Silurians have a plague that can kill her. Still, the Doctor and Rose pick-up a psychic message from Captain Jack – which the Doctor ignores.

The Tenth Doctor, Cindy, and Gabby arrive on a space station, where they are welcomed with open arms. The Doctor fixes the station’s power overload, but he can’t do a lot about an invasion of Cybermen. That the Cybermen have been affected by the White Void and are acting weird just makes the situation that much more strange.

The Eleventh Doctor and Alice end-up on ancient Gallifrey, just as the Time Lords are beginning to experiment with time and space travel. Even though the Doctor warns Alice they must be extra careful and not interfere, the Doctor, well, does. He walks in on a TARDIS training session and uses calming persuasion instead of “breaking” to get the new time-space capsule to accept an interior dimension bubble. His success convinces Rassilon that the Doctor will be perfect for his test pilot program. Alice gets a warning about this from the Second Doctor, but when she gets to the training and testing center – it’s too late, the Doctor’s time/space capsule has exploded with him inside it.

We also see brief cameos of the Third Doctor in this volume as he briefly appears in one of his successors TARDISes. The story will be continued in the next volume.

Most of the stories in this volume felt somewhat disjointed and out of sync. Just as one was getting involved in the individual story of an individual Doctor and companions, that story would end on a cliffhanger. The cliffhangers usually weren’t resolved, so it left the reader hanging. Also, The Lost Dimension promises to feature all Twelve Doctors – but the Classic Doctors only appear in cameos, and the New Who Doctors get longer stories within the main storyline. Not that the New Who stories are bad – I enjoyed them. Titan Comics has excellent writers for their various New Who series. I was frustrated by the unresolved cliffhangers though. The general storyline involves this White Void that’s taking over space. Still, recommended.

Book Review – Doctor Who: The Supremacy of the Cybermen

  • Title: The Supremacy of the Cybermen
  • Authors: Cavan Scott and George Mann
  • Artists: Ivan Rodriguez, Walter Geovanni, Alessandro Vitti, Tazio Bettin, Nicola Righi, Enrica Eren Angiolini, Richard Starkings, Jimmy Betancourt
  • Line: Multi-Doctor Specials (Doctor Who Comics Event)
  • Characters: Twelfth Doctor, Eleventh Doctor, Tenth Doctor, Ninth Doctor, Gabby Gonzalez, Cindy Wu, Alice Obiefune, Rose Tyler, Captain Jack Harkness, Jackie Tyler
  • Collection Date: 2017
  • Collected Issues: Issues # 1-5
  • Publisher: Titan Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 3/25/2017

Supremacy of the Cybermen is the collection of the 2016 Doctor Who Comics event. It features the four modern Doctors and their companions in the main stories, plus cameos from every Doctor ever from Hartnell to John Hurt (the “War Doctor”). The story features Cybermen who have gotten a hold of time travel technology and are changing history. The Doctors, in various time periods know something is wrong but don’t know how to fight it. And, scarily enough, they are losing. From Cyber-Silurians in the Dinosaur Age, to Ace as a Cyber-person attacking the Seventh Doctor – this book is richly illustrated and quite depressing – until the very end.

It is the Twelfth Doctor who discovers that the Cybermen aren’t bent on attacking Gallifrey, but that Rassilon has forged an alliance with the Cybermen – giving them control of space/time and the Eye of Harmony (Gallifrey’s black hole that powers time travel) itself. The Doctor is justifiably angry at Rassilon and realises he is being duped by the Cybermen.

Rassilon is absorbed as pure regenerative energy, then the Doctor is also connected to the Eye of Harmony. Inside, the Doctor meets Rassilon and they must work together to overcome the Cybermen’s plot. But the Twelfth Doctor still remembers the disasters of the past – even after they are reversed.

I enjoyed this story very much, especially the cameos of the past Doctors. The artwork was particularly beautiful. And the story was very complex. Doctor Who Supremacy of the Cybermen is a story not to be missed by any Doctor Who fan. Highly recommended.

Book Review – Eleventh Doctor Vol. 4 – The Then and the Now

  • Title: The Then and the Now
  • Authors: Si Spurrier and Rob Williams
  • Artists: Simon Fraser, Warren Pleece, Gary Caldwell, Hi-Fi, Richard Starkings, Jimmy Betancourt
  • Line: 11th Doctor
  • Characters: Eleventh Doctor, Alice Obiefune, The War Doctor, Abslom Daak
  • Collection Date: 2016
  • Collected Issues: Year 2, Issues # 1-5
  • Publisher: Titan Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 5/30/2016

Titan Comics Doctor Who: The Then and the Now starts off it’s collection of the second year of their adventures of the Eleventh Doctor as played by Matt Smith on the BBC television series, and his companion Alice Obiefune. This story mentions the Time War and glimpses of the War Doctor (as portrayed by John Hurt) occur throughout the book. But I was expecting to see the Eleventh Doctor and the War Doctor meet – or at least a full flashback and that didn’t happen.

However, even though at times the story was confusing, and it ended on a cliffhanger, it was still a good book – exciting, with excellent characterization, and beautiful art.

This story also brings in Abslom Daak from Doctor Who Magazine and is used with permission. Daak’s a chainsaw (chain sword) wielding Dalek-killing mercenary – and an odd choice for a one-time companion.

I think this story will be interesting once it gets going, however, this particular story felt like a very confused beginning, and it had no end because of the cliff-hanger. I’m thinking that Year 2 for the Eleventh Doctor will be like Year One, in that it’s mostly a single story.

Update/Note: I have read volumes five and six, and volume six is reviewed on GoodReads; however, I want to post my reviews here on WordPress in order as much as possible. Therefore, I will re-read volume five and probably volume six as well and then post my reviews.

Book Review – Eleventh Doctor vol. 3 – Conversion

  • Title: Conversion
  • Authors: Al Ewing and Rob Williams
  • Artists: Simon Fraser, Boo Cook, Warren Pleece, Gary Caldwell, Hi-Fi, Richard Starkings, Jimmy Betancourt
  • Line: 11th Doctor
  • Characters: Eleventh Doctor, Alice Obiefune
  • Collection Date: 2015
  • Collected Issues: Issues # 11-15
  • Publisher: Titan Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 12/20/2015

I read this a few weeks ago, but never got around to writing a review because I was busy with other things. So here it goes, although the story is no longer fresh in my mind.

Doctor Who – Conversion is the third Eleventh Doctor (Matt Smith) graphic novel from Titan Comics. It features the companions original to the Titan Comics series of Eleventh Doctor adventures: Alice, Jones, and Arc. The artwork, as always for the Titan Comics Doctor Who graphic novels and comics is brilliantly good! The story promises to bring about a conclusion to the Serveyouinc storyline – and it seems to, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the villain of Titan’s 11th Doctor stories returns. The story also gives us more background to Arc’s origins – and start’s off where last issue’s backwards story ended (or started). And if you think that sounds confusing, much of the novel was very confusing as well. Also, Cybermen land in Roman Times during a Civil War, and the Doctor and his companions must prevent Earth’s history from being forever changed.

Overall, I felt this graphic novel was good, though not as good as the previous Eleventh Doctor volume, Serve You, though the two volumes are very inter-related.

I can highly recommend the Titan Comics series, though. Each set reflects the era it represents: the Tenth Doctor, the Eleventh Doctor, and the Twelfth Doctor. This year (2016) they will be adding the Ninth Doctor, the Eighth Doctor and a special Fourth Doctor special.

Book Review – Eleventh Doctor Vol. 2 – Serve You

  • Title: Serve You
  • Authors: Al Ewing and Rob Williams
  • Artists: Simon Fraser, Boo Cook, Warren Pleece, Gary Caldwell, Hi-Fi, Richard Starkings, Jimmy Betancourt
  • Line: 11th Doctor
  • Characters: Eleventh Doctor, Alice Obiefune
  • Collection Date: 2015
  • Collected Issues: Issues # 6-10
  • Publisher: Titan Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 10/26/2015

The first story in Titan Comics 11th Doctor Doctor Who graphic novel, Serve You is presented in a very unique, confusing, but ultimately successful fashion: backwards. It opens with Alice and the Doctor lamenting the loss of Jones. The bottom panel is even marked, “The End”. But then the story leaps back in time. Every page or so is earlier than the previous one, and even the page numbers run backwards. This is disconcerting, but eventually the Doctor, who remains conscious through the time leaps, even if his “other body” has been knocked unconscious, explains what is happening. He’s able to save both Jones and Arc with help from Alice and defeat the Nimon who has gotten into the TARDIS. The Doctor even saves (and protects) the planet the Nimon had destroyed. Despite the initial confusion, the story works.

Chapter 7 and 8 tell the story of an eons-long space war that comes to Earth but doesn’t involve Earth. Never-the-less the Doctor and his companions become involved. It’s a good story and I liked Alice’s involvement. Bits of the story, without giving too much away, reminded me of Farscape (crossed with the film 2001).

Chapters 9 and 10 resolve the on-going Serveyouinc storyline from volume 1 of the Titan Comics 11th Doctor graphic novel series. I must admit, I found parts of it to be very confusing. I liked some parts and not others. Overall, I was a bit (just a bit) disappointed as to how the conflict which has been building through two graphic novels was resolved.

Still, overall Serve You is an excellent Doctor Who graphic novel. The art is gorgeous, as it has been for all the Titan Comics I’ve read so far (in the Doctor Who line). The stories really feel like episodes from the Matt Smith era, even though the Doctor has new companions. There is a slight young adult feel to the stories, but they are still quite enjoyable for adults. Both Serve You and the series of Doctor Who graphic novels are recommended.