Riverdale Season 2 Review (Spoilers)

  • Series Title: Riverdale
  • Season: Season 2
  • Episodes: 22
  • Discs: 4
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: KJ Apa, Lili Reinhart, Camila Mendes, Cole Sprouse, Madelaine Petsch, Ashleigh Murray, Marisol Nichols, Luke Perry
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

Some Spoilers Below – be warned.

Riverdale Season 2 opens with the cliffhanger from the end of Season 1 with Fred Andrews getting shot at Pop’s. Archie runs to his father and also sees the man, a man in a Black Hood, who shot his father. Archie rushes to the hospital with his Dad. It’s a near thing, but Fred recovers. Shortly thereafter Ms. Grundy (Archie’s former music teacher) is murdered in Greendale, and Moose and Midge are attacked by a hooded man with a gun in Lover’s Lane, where they are also trying the new street drug, Jingle Jangle. The mystery for the season is: Who is the Black Hood? The mystery of who the Black Hood is is simply not as compelling as the mystery of Who Killed Jason Blossom? from last season. Not to say Season 2 is bad – it isn’t. This is still a well-crafted mystery show, but the first season had a tenser feel and a mystery that was more connected to the characters. About halfway through the season, the Black Hood, who has been tormenting Betty with sick phone calls, is caught. But Archie isn’t sure it’s the right man, because he saw the Black Hood’s eyes and he thinks he could identify him. But since Sheriff Keller shot the man in the back (while he was threatening Archie and Betty) the narrative is set.

The rest of the season focuses more on the characters and their dark emotions and secrets. Whereas season 1 showed us some really messed-up parents, season 2 shows us teenagers who haven’t fallen that far from the tree so to speak. Betty is especially becoming a dark character, but Archie isn’t the “all-American teenager” he appears to be – from briefly founding a vigilante group/protection league for students called, “The Red Circle”, to working for Veronica’s mobster father, Hiram Lodge – Archie is often just not a sweet kid, not by a long shot.

Meanwhile, Jughead is shipped off to the South Side of Riverdale, and it’s through him that we meet new characters, see new locations and form sympathies with people who are poorer than those on the “Northside” and who have fewer opportunities. In his new school, Southside High – a nightmare of a place with metal detectors on the doors, no doors in the restrooms, drugs, gangs, and violence, Jughead’s first priority is to get the school paper up and running again. Told by the teacher-sponsor to steer clear of drugs and gangs, Jughead plans on doing just that. But Toni Topaz, a girl in his father’s gang the Southside Serpents, gives him lay of the land and warns him that he needs to join the Serpents or a rival gang, the Ghoulies, will have him for lunch. Jughead resists briefly but then joins the Serpents. In the Serpents, he finds a home, a community, and as he tries to navigate this new and dangerous world, he also finds dangerous rivals in the gang, especially Tall Boy and the Serpent lawyer, or “Snake Charmer”, Penny.

Jughead shines throughout the season – his narration underlines many of the episodes, and episodes without it are somehow missing something. Jughead emerges as an artistic, romantic, and justice-seeking soul, despite his dark, sarcastic narration. Jughead believes in justice, justice for all, and even manages to see the good in the Serpents.

Unfortunately, another theme of the season is the Northside blaming every bad thing on the Serpents, including the Black Hood crimes (who turns out not to be a Serpent or even from the Southside – both of them). From Hiram Lodge’s business dealings to acquire Southside land, and even landmarks, at rock-bottom prices for a project that’s very hush-hush; to Betty’s mother’s tirades against the Southside in her paper, The Register, to the mayor and Riverdale principal attacking Southside tradition – it’s a virtual Civil War in Riverdale. And pretty much everything the more privileged Northsiders say about the Southside is proven false, but too late to stop Hiram’s plans.

Once we’ve met our Southside cast, and become familiar with its locations – things are shaken up. Southside High is closed so Hiram can buy the land dirt cheap, for, it turns out, building a prison. Jughead, Toni, and other Serpents are sent to Riverdale High. There’s an adjustment period, but when it looks like the Serpents will be transferred again to a school two hours away, Archie and Jughead rally the school to stand with the new students – who get to stay.

Season 2 of Riverdale was not as focused as Season 1 – some plotlines get dropped or resolved too quickly. The street drug Jingle Jangle is mentioned in the first episode, but other than a pair of kids getting high on the drug at Lover’s Lane while doing what one does at Lover’s Lane, and one wild party held by Veronica and an old friend of her’s Nick St. Clair – the drug isn’t much of an important plot. It doesn’t help that Jingle Jangle looks like Pixie Stix – and it’s eaten the same way. Nick is a jerk who tries to assault Veronica (and gets flattened for his trouble), then roofie’s Cheryl and tries to date rape her – only to be stopped by the Pussycats, led by Veronica and Josie. Jingle Jangle is made by a drug dealer called “The Sugarman” with ties to Clifford Blossom. But when the Black Hood sends Betty after him, she discovers his identity in one episode – so not much suspense there.

The kids have ups and downs in their relationships, but for the most part throughout the season, it’s Archie and Veronica and Betty and Jughead. Any issues tend to be temporary. At the very end of the season, we find out that Cheryl is a lesbian, who starts a relationship with Toni Topaz. I hope we see more of this relationship next season because the little we see crackles and it’s awesome. And yes, Cheryl’s horrible mother disapproves of her daughter’s sexuality. Penelope Blossom even tries to have it beat out of her, but Kevin and Veronica rescue Cheryl. (Their line? “Cheryl, We’re here to rescue you!”)

This season includes, “Carrie, the Musical”, which seems to fit the characters, though it also felt like an episode of Glee instead of Riverdale. But the episode ends with Midge getting killed, which gets everyone to realize they caught the wrong guy when it comes to the Black Hood. The end of the season is a wild ride to find out who the Black Hood is. Not saying who it was, though it wasn’t entirely a surprise, especially with hints that get dropped quickly. Also, a character I never quite trusted. And that’s all I’m saying about that.

Overall, I recommend Riverdale Season 2, but it’s not for younger viewers – there’s a lot of implied violence and sex (strong PG-13 levels, sometimes light R). I like Jughead’s narration. When our core characters – Jughead, Betty, Veronica, and Archie are together and not on the outs or fighting – it works. Some of the secondary characters: Cheryl, Josie, Kevin, and now Toni, round out the cast and add some needed diversity to the universe. I will definitely watch Season 3.

Read my review of Riverdale Season 1.

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Free Comic Book Day 2018

Free Comic Book Day is an annual event to promote independent comic book shops and the art and stories of comic books for all ages. I’ve been attending Free Comic Book Day for three or four years now, and I usually really, really enjoy it. This year, unfortunately, I didn’t enjoy it as much – but that’s nothing on the site of the event or anything – I ended up getting sick, and that made it really hard to have a good time.

I met up with a friend of mine – at 8:30am. The plan was to go to his favorite coffee shop and then to the event at our local comic shop, Vault of Midnight. Well, we got to the shop before it even opened, so of course, there was a very long line. I’d been expecting this. And it was very warm and sunny, which I figured would be an improvement on the cold of last year. Sigh. Well… First, my friend started to complain of not feeling well, not that we could do much about it since we were in line. Then I started to not feel well myself. So by the time we were at the front of the line, which wasn’t really that long, considering, both of us ending up going through the store as fast as possible to pick up our free books, and I picked up my pull. I also bought Bombshells, which I ended up loving! After leaving the store we ended-up at a nearby restaurant to use the facilities and I sat at the bar and drank three glasses of water and an iced tea in about 20 minutes. The verdict was: dehydrated and too much sun. And because I still didn’t feel great – I went straight home. But with all of that, the event was still great. I love Free Comic Book Day – and, all things considered, I had a good time, I just really wish I hadn’t been so sick. The staff at the comic book store were great – couldn’t have been better.

FCBD 2018 – Doctor Who from Titan Comics

I always pick-up the Titan Comics Doctor Who offering and this year was no exception. The book this year offers three stories, which stand alone but also wet the appetite for the next year in Titan’s many Doctor Who series of books and graphic novels. The first story is, “Catch a Falling Star”, Gabby is falling through space, reflecting on her life and her imminent death. It’s a good character piece, even though I found myself lost a bit as I’m currently way behind on my Doctor Who graphic novels. The end is wonderful, and I won’t spoil it, though I will say that I hope it means what I think it means.

The second story, “The Armageddon Gambit”, has the Seventh Doctor and Ace running into a war-like species, whom the Doctor defeats with cleverness and skill. The Doctor then gets a message from Captain Gilmore and his Counter-Measures team. The story ends with a “to be continued in Operation Volcano!” information box. I hope this means that sometime next year, Titan will issue a Classic Doctors graphic novel featuring the Seventh Doctor and Ace – one of my favorite Doctor-Companion combinations.

The final story, “Midnight Feast” features the Eleventh Doctor and Alice. It’s a fun story of the Doctor in search of the perfect Midnight Snack – only to discover a plain tuna sandwich made by his companion is exactly what he’s looking for.

The final page of the book is a splash page introduction of Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor – answering the question of whether Titan would be doing a 13th Doctor series (yes!) and the inside back cover announces the new book’s creative team: Jody Houser (writer) and Rachael Stott (art). I’m looking forward to the new book, but as usual, for Doctor Who comics from Titan, I will probably wait for the graphic novel. Although the three stories were short, and all meant as introductions to future volumes of Titan’s various series, I enjoyed the book.

Riverdale – Archie Comics

Next, Riverdale, from Archie Comics, based on the CW television series. I’m behind on Riverdale as well, but this story is outside current continuity – so there were no spoilers. In “Chock’Lit Shoppe of Horrors”, on a dark and stormy night, no less, Betty goes to Pop’s to interview Pop about the history of his restaurant and Riverdale. Pop obliges her with a series of stories: famous celebrities who have stopped by Pop’s, the story of Sweetie the hidden monster of the Sweetwater River, and finally a mysterious stranger who gave him some advice which saved Pop’s – but at a cost. It’s a wonderful story, and completely self-contained. I enjoyed it very much. The final pages of the book include informative advertisements for other books from Archie Comics both classic all-ages books and modern books for older (teen) readers.

The Mall – Scout Comics

The Mall I picked up solely because of the cover. With the grey, black, white, and hot pink – it screamed 80s Noir, and it caught my eye. I ended up really enjoying it. I hope this book comes out in a collected volume. The Mall is about a typical 80s shopping mall, a hang-out spot of typical suburban teenagers. Well, except for the fact that the “typical” nerd is the illegitimate son of a mobster, and already working for the mob, picking up money, delivering cash, and running odd jobs. He’s fallen for the cheerleader, and when he hears her complaining how her date ignores her to play a kung-fu arcade video game, our hero jumps in, telling the cheerleader he can beat her boyfriend. The bet is arranged, and Diego wins – not only humiliating Chauncy (the boyfriend) but winning a date – dinner and a dance with the cheerleader. Diego also has a sideline with the Cubans, so his dinner date is a bit complicated with business – but it all works out. I enjoyed this story. It’s self-contained but would also work as the first chapter of a larger story. The book also contains short previews for several other books from Scout Comics, many of which sounded very interesting.

DC Nation #0 – DC Comics

DC Nation # 0 is the first preview issue of a new DC Comics news and feature magazine. The cover cost of the first preview issue was only 25 cents, and per the information in the book, new issues will be free. I hope so – because this was an enjoyable read! This issue contains three stories, all of which are previews of upcoming events or new books in the DC universe.

The first story is Batman in “Your Big Day”, The Joker has taken a random guy hostage in his house and states he is waiting for an invitation in the mail to Batman’s upcoming wedding. There’s a great deal of tension between Joker and this random guy, who goes from insisting he has a daughter so the Joker shouldn’t kill him, to asking the Joker to kill him to get the tension over with. Finally, the mail arrives, and the Joker claims he received his invite. But it isn’t an invitation at all – it’s a letter from the daughter’s school. Not that random guy knows that – because the Joker kills him.

The next story features Superman in “Office Space”. Clark returns to the Daily Planet in time for Perry White’s declaration that he’s done printing suspicion, innuendo, rumor, and fear-mongering about Superman. He insists on facts and good reporting. He also gives Lois’s office to Clark, since she’s quit the Daily Planet. Clark insists he doesn’t want the office but doesn’t explain. Perry also introduces Robinson Goode, formerly of the Star City Sentinel, the new city beat reporter. We later see Robinson in a bar, talking to someone, and it seems she’s up to no good, pardon the pun. This is a preview of the new Man of Steel series.

Finally in the “No Justice” prelude, the Justice League, or rather, Leagues, led by Batman are up against an intergalactic threat. This short story introduces the four teams who will fight the Omega Titans, “giant beings who absorbs galaxies for energy”. The teams are: Justice League: Team Entropy (Lobo, Deathstroke, Lex Luthor, and Beast Boy); JL: Team Mystery (Martian Manhunter, Superman, Starro, Starfire, Sinestro); JL: Team Wonder (Wonder Woman, Raven, Doctor Fate, Etrigan the Demon, and Zatanna); and finally JL: Team Wisdom (Cyborg, Atom, Robin (Damian Wayne), The Flash, and Harley Quinn). It’s an introduction – but it sounds like an awesome, complex, galaxy-spanning story.

Overall, I enjoyed the books I choose at Free Comic Book Day. The event was enjoyable, though I would have enjoyed it more if I’d been feeling better. Still, that most certainly wasn’t the fault of the store or the event organizers. I cannot wait for next year! Recommended – if there’s an FCBD event near you next year, make it a point to go. You’ll not be disappointed!

Riverdale Season 1 Review (Spoiler-free)

  • Series Title: Riverdale
  • Season: Season 1
  • Episodes: 13
  • Discs: 3
  • Network: CW
  • Cast: KJ Apa, Lili Reinhart, Camila Mendes, Cole Sprouse, Madelaine Petsch, Ashleigh Murray, Marisol Nichols, Luke Perry
  • Format: Color, Widescreen, NTSC, R1

The CW’s Riverdale is much, much better than I expected, and, in a sense even better than it has any right to be. The show is like Twin Peaks meets the Archie comic books characters meets a typical CW teen/twenty-something soap opera, with a little bit of the original Scooby Doo Mysteries from Saturday mornings, and just a dash of film noir. The series spends it’s first few episodes introducing the characters and their world, but quickly becomes focused on one question and plot point: Who killed Jason Blossom?

When watching a long-form mystery – there are two tests: how does it work on first viewing? And does it still work upon re-watching? Riverdale passes both tests. When watching this show last year week to week, each episode brought new secrets, new revelations, new information, as slowly week-by-week the kids from Riverdale: Archie, Betty, Veronica, and Jughead not only formed their own relationships – but uncovered the mystery and found out the murderer in episode 11 and 12. Upon re-watching the series, knowing who the murderer was – the series was still very watchable, even more so. Knowing “whodunit” did not, as it often does, especially in long-form mysteries, make this show boring, or make the viewer (well this viewer) want to bang their head against a table or yell at the characters in frustration. So it’s a good mystery. There a few scenes, here and there, in the entire first ten episodes, that have a stronger meaning once you know the murderer’s identity, but the entire series also holds up incredibly well. Riverdale has the same staying power for it’s first season as a neo-noir like L.A. Confidential, or a classic one like Double Indemnity.

Each episode of the series has opening and closing narration by Jughead, who is writing a manuscript about Jason’s death (in episode 1, everyone in town thinks he accidentally drowned – this changes when two gay teenagers go to the river for a tryst and instead find Jason’s body). This adds to the film-noir feel, and acts as a reflection on the events of the series, much like the narration in many classic films noir, especially those directed by Billy Wilder.

The series also has, as a CW show, that excellently done, teenagers learning how to grow up and dealing with conflicts with parents. However, in Riverdale, pretty much every parent is nuts – and hiding a lot of secrets. And what I picked-up on a second watch was that these parents are still holding on to feelings from high school: old crushes, resentments, rivalry, anger, jealousy. In a sense, these bonkers parents never grew-up, and Archie and his friends are considerably more mature than their parents. Which isn’t to say these kids are perfect. The series opens with Archie having a Summer fling with his music teacher – something he tries to continue into the school year, but it, of course, falls apart – and the unprofessional teacher leaves after episode 4. Later in the series, Betty convinces Archie to have a birthday party for Jughead because he doesn’t care about his birthday and never even had a party. Cheryl, back to feuding with the others, crashes the party and turns it into a kegger. When you compare the behavior of the “kids” with the parents – a central question emerges: Will these young characters repeat the mistakes of their parents? Will they be ruled by the same prejudices, the same hatreds, the same jealousies, and the same assumptions? Or will our characters be better? And in season one, for the most part, they seem to be better.

The cinematography in this series is incredible. The series starts in Summer, the Fourth of July, with everything lit in a warm, golden glow. It proceeds through Fall – with mist and haze, then into Winter. Perhaps accidentally, perhaps not, but the changing of seasons perfectly reflects the series’ slide into darkness as more and more secrets come to light. The use of red to indicate the influence of the rich Blossom family is striking throughout the series. The snow adds to the feeling of scenes, as does the mist and rain. This is one of the few television series I’ve ever seen in my life that looks like it actually takes place in the Upper Midwest (even in a fictional town), rather than on Hollywood backlots. And the cinematography is movie-worthy. This show CW can hold up to demonstrate just what they are capable of because it shines.

Finally, the DVD box set includes deleted scenes for most episodes. Some of these deleted scenes are simply extra bits, probably cut for time. But there are a series of scenes between Veronica and her mother, Hermione, that changes their relationship – and not for the better. And there’s a scene between Jughead and his father, JP, that is just fantastic. That scene also sheds light on a seemingly bad decision Jughead makes in the final episode (he’s between a rock and a hard place – so his decision also makes sense for the character, if not being the best thing he could do). Between the scenes with Hermoine and the scene with Jughead – it seems to be setting-up season 2, something I am eager to see.

The question of who killed Jason is revealed in episode 12. But where in most series, the following episode (and last of the season) would merely be a chance for the characters to catch their breath, the screenwriters to wrap-up loose ends and the series to be reset for the next season – Riverdale takes a darker path. Episode 13 sees the fallout of the revelation of the murderer that feels real, but scary. It also sees major changes for the characters, especially for Jughead. There are events in the last episode of the season that will no doubt lead directly to Season 2, and I’m not just talking about the shocking twist at the end of the episode.

I highly, highly recommend watching Riverdale. It wasn’t just hype that made this show one of the most talked about series introduced last year. If some of the teen-aged hijinks at the start of the season bother you, stick with it. I initially wondered why Archie was introduced in such an essentially negative way – but having re-watched the entire thing, I realized it was actually a method to introduce a character that on paper could be considered perfect: captain of the football team, musician, popular, ladies man, but also friends with the “unpopular” kids at school – gods, Archie Andrews could have been the most boring “Marty Sue” character on TV. So, starting with showing him having a fault? That makes the character more interesting. It also serves plot purposes and shows his honesty beyond his issues with women (Archie manages to have a relationship with every girl at his school anyway). Oh and Bechdel Test? This show smashes it wide open. Does it count as “talking about a man” if the guy in question is dead and the women are trying to solve his murder? Riverdale is a must-watch, and I give it 5 out of 5 stars. Again, highly, highly recommended.

Free Comic Book Day 2017

Free Comic Book Day 2017 was Saturday May 6th, 2017. I went with a friend of mine and we arrived probably around 11:00 am. So there was a long line that wrapped around the corner. However, it was still an excellent event. There were cosplayers, and Vault of Midnight, my local comics shop, had their side walk activity area with vendors, artists, and kids activities. This year there was even a food truck! Once inside the store was less packed solid than last year – making it even easier to get to the free comics on the back wall as well as to look around the store for other items to purchase. This year we were allowed to choose four free promo books. I also picked-up my weekly pull list comics and inquired about a Doctor Who graphic novel that was missing from my collection. It is to the credit of the excellent staff at Vault of Midnight that even as busy as they were, they were still willing to check on a special order for me.

On to the comics, this year I picked-up four free comics, all tie-ins by chance. I picked up: Titan’s Four Doctors FCBD event issue; IDW’s Star Trek the Next Generation Mirror Broken; Archie Comics Betty and Veronica (a tie-in to Riverdale, somewhat), and DC’s Wonder Woman.

I’m going to start by discussing Wonder Woman. I picked this free promo comic up thinking it would be a tie-in to this Summer’s Wonder Woman movie. However, I was a bit disappointed because it’s actually a re-print of Wonder Woman Rebirth #1, which I have already read. In fact, Wonder Woman has been on my pull list since Rebirth started. Also, with two volumes of Wonder Woman Rebirth available in graphic novel format – it’s probably something that a lot of people have read since it’s included in the first Wonder Woman Rebirth Graphic Novel. That’s the negative. The positive is – I re-read the comic anyway and I really enjoyed it. As much as I enjoy Rebirth, and I do, Wonder Woman and Green Arrow have been the hardest lines for me to “get in to” so to speak. I finally dropped Green Arrow (I applaud the extremely brave social commentary of Green Arrow – but I found I couldn’t connect to Oliver and it always ended-up at the bottom of the stack when I was reading my books.) Wonder Woman is also teetering on the edge of being dropped from my pull – though I’d probably get the graphic novels instead. With two completely different storylines, Wonder Woman is really hard to follow month to month, especially if one isn’t that familiar with her storyline and background in the comics. But having said all that, I re-read this, the first issue of Wonder Woman Rebirth, and I found I really enjoyed it. Having read the bi-weekly book for about a year, I had a slightly better idea what was going on. If you haven’t read the new Wonder Woman, I do recommend it, I just feel the graphic novels are an easier format for enjoying the stories.

Betty and Veronica I picked up as a tie-in to Riverdale, the new series on the CW that’s based on Archie Comics. This story was fun, and full of surprises. It’s narrated by J. Farnsworth Wigglebottom III (a.k.a Hot Dog) Jughead’s dog. The dog speaks directly to the audience and is amusing and fun as he both narrates and comments on the action. Wigglebottom even “eats” two pages of the comic and then has Betty and Veronica giving exposition instead – in swimsuits. There’s a fair amount of humor in the book too. The story involves a national coffee chain buying out and closing down Pop’s the diner where the kids hang out. Betty is angered by this and rallies everyone to save Pop’s. When she discovers that Veronica’s father owns the coffee company, and the bank that holds Pop’s mortgage, Betty explodes at Veronica – and the issue ends there. The back of the book includes informative advertisements for Archie Comics, including the “new Archie”, and a Riverdale tie-in. There are also character portraits from Riverdale. Overall, I enjoyed this. The story is somewhat basic, one of the characters even comments that threats of Pop’s closing seem to happen a lot. But the breaking of the fourth wall, and the humor, make this an enjoyable read. Betty and Veronica and the other newer Archie comic books make for an excellent comic for teens and children, filled with Americana and a slightly old-fashioned bent.

Star Trek: The Next Generation – Mirror Broken is a return trip to the Next Gen Mirror Universe. This story follows Lt. Barclay’s Mirror Universe double. I have always like Lt. Barclay and his Mirror Universe counterpart is tough, capable, and definitely shaped by the circumstances of his universe. In the Mirror universe, the Empire is breaking down, having suffered catastrophic wars with the Klingons and the Cardassians – Spock’s era of reform is over, resulting in an even more ruthless attitude within the Terran Empire – or what’s left of it. Assassination is still the only means of advancement, something we forget as we see Barclay contemplating getting out of engineering and into a “better” life. I liked the focus on a single character with basically a concluded story in this promo book. It’s also a good intro to the ST:TNG Mirror Universe comic, and the write-up for that series promises to be very character-focused, introducing a character per issue before any major plot. That’s the type of writing I like in comics – focus on character, and character interaction as well as world-building. The plots should always add to this. But when mere “action” takes over, without character being explored – the stories can fall flat. This issue of the Star Trek: The Next Generation Mirror Universe comic emphasizes character, and a relatively minor one at that (Barclay) and I enjoyed it. The last pages of the book explain three other available series from IDW, with three sample pages of each one. They are Star Trek – Boldly Go, which follows on from the reboot Star Trek films, taking place just after Star Trek Beyond. The second is Star Trek / Green Lantern. And the third is, Star Trek – Waypoint. Star Trek – Waypoint is an anthology series featuring all the various versions of Trek, though the sample issue seems to be set in a future version of Trek (Data has been uploaded to the Enterprise and is now the ship’s computer, though he projects holograms of himself to various duty stations.) all three of these series looked pretty good, and I actually plan on looking for a graphic novel version of the ST/GL crossover series. The art in this book (and the sample pages) is also very good, with a lovely painted look that’s has a dark undertone that’s appropriate for the Mirror universe. The color palettes for the sample pages fit the various versions of Trek they represent. If you are a Star Trek fan, check out IDW’s comic series – you won’t be disappointed, I think.

Doctor Who – The Promise (Four Doctors, FCBD 2017) begins, appropriately enough with teh Twelfth Doctor and Bill running on an alien planet. They find an ancient temple and enter, using YMCA as the visual key lock. The Doctor locates a fob watch, but it’s broken. He and Bill tell the local aliens a story and prevent a civil war. In the TARDIS, Bill asks the Doctor to tell her the real story and he tells her about his friend, Plex. The story flashes back to when the Ninth Doctor has to break the bad news to the hermit, Plex, that his entire planet has been destroyed. Plex then reveals to the Doctor he’s producing clones from his own stem cells and siphoned Time Lord Arton energy. The Tenth Doctor visits Plex when he dies, where he sees a hologram from his friend, who sends him to the planet of the clones. The Tenth Doctor has t “fixing” the overly deferential nature of the race of alien clones. The Eleventh Doctor awakens Plex, who becomes the leader of his re-united planet. Though as the Twelfth Doctor tells Bill, he’s afraid the society will break down again. This is a pretty good story, though it’s a bit hard to follow at times, since the different Doctors visit Plex at different times in his life – and nothing occurs in linear order. The back of the promo book includes a very handy catalog of Titan’s various Doctor Who graphic novels and specials. The art is excellent, and colorful in this book.