The Flash Season 5 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 5
  • Episodes: 22
  • Discs: 5
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Hartley Sawyer, Jessica Parker Kennedy
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

This review contains spoilers for Season 5 of The Flash.

The mysterious young girl who appeared at the end of Season 4 of The Flash is Nora West-Allen, Barry and Iris’s daughter from the future. She’s traveled to the past to meet and spend time with her father who has been missing most of her life and to stop Cicada, a villain that the Flash never caught. To solve the mystery of Cicada, the team at S.T.A.R. Labs brings in Sherloque Wells from another Earth – the best detective in the multiverse. Sherloque is French, a good detective, and initially not good with people – he’s also been married seven times and has five ex-wives, so he likes being paid for his work so he can keep up with his alimony payments.

Season 5 has Nora building her relationship with her parents, she initially doesn’t get along with Iris but they work things out, and the season also has the season trying to stop Cicada. Sherloque tells them who Cicada is – but due to Nora’s interference in the timeline not only is this Cicada killing different victims – it’s a different person. It turns out a man named, Dwyer, who works in a chemical plant, became the guardian of a little girl named Grace after her parents were killed in an accident. Dwyer initially has no idea how to raise a child, but he grows to love Grace and tries to be a good parent to her. The night of the Enlightenment when Barry and Nora break up the satellite and sent dark-matter infused shards to Earth, Dwyer and Grace are at a street carnival. A dagger-shaped shard hits Dwyer and Grace is knocked on to the concrete and ends-up in a coma. Dwyer, with the help of a very prejudiced doctor, decides that meta-humans were to blame for Grace’s coma and her parents’ death and that all metas are dangerous and therefore evil. Dwyer decides that all meta-humans must die and becomes the serial killer, Cicada.

The season has Team Flash, including Sherloque, working to solve this mystery – Who is Cicada? How can they stop him? As in any long-form mystery, they gradually discover clues and information about the case. Cicada himself is a meta and using the dagger he can dampen the powers of other metas – this makes Barry and company helpless when they fight him. The season also has Cisco and Caitlyn developing a cure for meta powers. They insist the cure will not be used as a weapon, but that only people who choose to do so will cure their meta-human powers. Barry suggests using the cure on Cicada, but Cisco and Caitlyn insist they have to give Cicada a choice. They also discover that the reason Grace didn’t wake up from her coma is that she has a piece of the satellite embedded in her forehead, flooding her body with dark matter and making her a meta who can steal powers from other metas.

Team Flash is able to capture Cicada and offer him the cure. When they explain Grace is a meta, he agrees to take the cure if Grace gets it too. Dwyer also insists that the doctor he’s been working with administer the cure. But when they try, a second Cicada breaks into S.T.A.R. labs. She kills the doctor. Team Flash has to reset and figure out who this new Cicada is. Nora travels back to the future to speak to her up to now unseen partner – it’s Eobard Thawne who is on death row. Sherloque has been trying to solve the case of Nora West-Allen throughout the season, and when Nora is about to admit she’s working with Thawne, Sherloque interrupts her and tells the team she’s working with Thawne. Barry flips out and takes Nora back to the future. Iris and Ralph use a Time Bubble to travel to the future to talk to Nora and bring her back, but when she realizes Barry isn’t there – she gets so angry she uses Thawne’s last lesson and disappears into the Negative Speed Force. Back in 2019, she gathers together a group of young, female rogues and robs a military weapons research lab to steal a mirror gun that will destroy Cicada’s dagger.

Nora and Barry repair their relationship and the team refocuses on stopping Cicada II (a future version of Grace). Sherloque also meets and falls for Rene Adler, Earth 1’s version of Irene Adler (all his wives are Irene Adler’s from different Earths). Cisco meets a photographer in a bar named Kamilla and starts dating her. Joe West and DA Cecille Horton raise their new baby girl. Wally is in a few episodes at the beginning of the season, then goes on sabbatical in Tibet and isn’t seen again, though he’s mentioned a couple of times.

Team Flash discovers Cicada II has a weapon that will kill all the metas, not only in Central City but in the US. Sherloque sends Rene to his Earth to keep her safe. CCPD, under the direction of Joe West, organizes a mass distribution of the cure. Team Flash tries to stop Cicada and destroy the dagger, stop Cicada’s cure-bomb, and even convince Grace to take the cure – but the cure doesn’t work because of the dark matter shard in her head. They eventually wake up Grace and manage to stop her from becoming Cicada.

However, Barry also wants to stop Thawne and when the dagger is destroyed, instead of being led to his execution (in 2049), he escapes. Also, the timeline changes catch up to everyone and Nora is wiped from existence and the Crisis which had been predicted for 2024 is moved up to 2019. Barry Allen will disappear in the Crisis.

I really liked Sherloque Wells – he’s an element of lightness in what could have been a very depressing season. Nora is earnest, and makes a lot of mistakes – and she didn’t deserve her fate. I hope that’s reversed in next year’s crossover.

This season includes Elseworlds – a crossover that is so much fun it deserves its own review. After Elseworlds, we are promised that next’s year’s crossover will be Crisis on Infinite Earths. Crisis was a massive DC Comics crossover, the first of its kind in the industry, and a story in which heroes died and nothing was the same. Read my review of the graphic novel Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Read my Review of The Flash Season 1.
Read my Review of The Flash Season 2.
Read my Review of The Flash Season 3.
Read my Review of The Flash Season 4.

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The Flash Season 4 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 4
  • Episodes: 23
  • Discs: 5
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Hartley Sawyer
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

Season Four of The Flash opens with Barry having been trapped in the Speed Force for six months with Iris in charge of the new “Team Kid Flash”. But when Wally is challenged by a Samari who demands to see the Flash, Cisco quickly works out a way to get Barry out of the Speed Force without blowing up the city. However, he appears in Keystone not Central City and when he returns… a wave of dark matter hits a city bus full of people, creating new metahumans.

Wally leaves to find himself, and Barry returns to Iris, being the Flash, and working with Cisco (Vibe) and Caitlin (Killer Frost). At the beginning of the season, they are dealing with a sudden increase in new metahumans, who like always can be criminals, or heroes, or something in between. But before long, Barry realizes there is a new villain at work – someone who isn’t a Speedster. The Thinker is a Chessmaster – someone who plans everything and has been plotting events for three years. The Thinker gained powers during the particle accelerator accident but also was “cursed’ with an advanced and deadly form of ALS. Yet, as we discover – his planning predates the particle accelerator accident as does his sociopathic nature and utter hatred of humanity.

Clifford Devoe was a history professor at Oxford when he met and married a scientist Marlize, and the two relocated to Central City to take tenured positions. However, Devoe was angered by his students paying more attention to their phones that him and his lectures. He also insulted Marlize and her work when they met – and revealed his negative view of humanity. As the season progresses, Marlize changes from being completely complacent and even an aide to her husband’s work, to a manipulative and cold woman, to a victim – as she realizes her husband’s plans would hurt her too, and he doesn’t care. By the end of the season, it’s clear that Marlize is key to taking down The Thinker.

Wally leaves after Barry returns. Cecile discovers she’s pregnant and tells Joe West about this. She also gains temporary telepathic abilities during her pregnancy. One of the bus metas is Ralph Dibny, a private investigator who lost his position with the CCPD after Barry as a new CSI accused him of evidence tampering. After a certain amount of questioning from Barry and doubt from Ralph, he joins Team Flash as the Elongated Man – and adds a considerable amount of lightness to the team. Ralph is one of those characters who acts tough and even self-centered, but he has a good heart and cares considerably about stopping the bad guy. I liked Ralph and I hope he’s still on the show next season.

Many of the other bus metahumans are good people who have no idea what to do with their new abilities. Unfortunately, The Thinker’s plan includes killing each of the new metas in turn and absorbing their powers, as well as using their bodies. This leads Marlize to realize her husband isn’t a good person, though it takes her a while – and her discovery that he’s drugging her and manipulating her mind and memory before she starts to realize anything.

This set includes part 3 of the “Crisis on Earth X” crossover – which was pretty good but it’s without context since parts 1 and 4 are missing (they are on the Supergirl and Legends of Tomorrow DVD sets presumably, which won’t be available until later in September). The first episode after the crossover has a “Did I miss something?” feel to it. And apparently, Iris and Barry are now married, finally. As I said in my review of Arrow Season 6, I really wish that Warner Brothers and the CW would do what the BBC does with the Doctor Who Christmas specials and put them out on DVD/Blu-ray immediately after the entire special airs. I would pay for a disc that includes the entire special – and still buy the season sets with that episode included in context on each series’ season set. It would be nice to have a movie version of the crossover special.

Despite all their setbacks, in the end, Team Flash, including Cecile, work together with secret weapon, Marlize, and defeat The Thinker, reversing his diabolical plan, as expected. However, this was a good season. Ralph Dibny, the Elongated Man, one of DC’s lesser-known heroes, provides a sense of humor and fun – and also someone for Barry to train as a new hero. The Thinker isn’t a speedster, which was a different approach to a season-long villain, though I must admit I liked the “new meta of the week” episodes almost better than the ones focusing on figuring out what the Thinker’s plans were and how to stop him. The Thinker is a chessmaster, a planner, someone who can easily pull Barry’s strings. He’s also a diabolical psychopath – something held in reserve until his evil plan is finally revealed. Parts of this worked, whereas other parts really seemed like our characters being dumb for plot purposes (especially when Barry is set-up, accused of murder, found guilty, and sentenced to life in prison in the same cell as his father had occupied).

Overall, I enjoyed the season and I’m looking forward to watching season 5.

Read my review of The Flash Season 1.

Read my review of The Flash Season 2.

Read my review of The Flash Season 3.