Book Review – Doctor Who: The Anachronauts

  • Title: The Anachronauts
  • Series: Doctor Who Companion Chronicles
  • Discs: 2 CDs
  • Author: Simon Guerrier
  • Director: Ken Bentley
  • Characters: Sara Kingdom, Steven Taylor, First Doctor
  • Cast: Jean Marsh, Peter Purves
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 05/25/2018

**Spoiler Alert** The Anachronauts is a two-disc story in the Big Finish Companion Chronicles line. It features the characters of the First Doctor, Steven, and Sara Kingdom and takes place during “The Daleks Master Plan” aired story. The Doctor, Sara and Steven are in the TARDIS when there is a collision with another vehicle. The TARDIS crash lands on a desert island and meets the crew of the other ship – which has been completely destroyed in the crash. This other ship was an experimental time ship. The TARDIS is nowhere to be seen. The new crew and the Doctor’s crew join together, although the time pilots don’t entirely trust the Doctor and company. They trek through the jungle, in the rain, find a cave, and locate the TARDIS food machine – sitting by itself in the jungle. Sara and Steven are convinced the TARDIS broke apart in the crash. The two groups stay in the cave overnight.

During their stay, however, they are attacked by what can only be described as a Banshee – a wailing figure with long, white hair. The Doctor calls this figure a “Time Sprite” but says it’s a myth, a fairy tale, something that does not exist.

The next morning the Doctor and Steven head out to find the TARDIS. Sara stays behind. The Doctor leads Steven straight to the time pilot’s ship, which he wants to investigate – where they run into the “Time Sprite” again. They return to the cave, only to find Sara missing. Steven confronts the time pilots and gets shot.

Meanwhile, Sara and the female leader of the Time Pilots climb a cliff to get a better view. The Time Pilots leader takes readings to try to determine where they are, then sets a homing beacon. Sara gets hurt climbing back down and Steven gets shot confronting the Time Pilots.

In part 2, after a bit of a review, Sara and the leader of the Time Pilots return to their ship for medical supplies for Steven. When they get back – Steven is fine, it’s as if he was never shot. Sara falls asleep and wakes feeling better than ever, her broken arm healed.

The Doctor tells everyone the Island was an illusion, a dream – and they all wake on the floor of the TARDIS. But the leader of the Time Pilots attacks – trying to pilot the TARDIS and eventually firing a gun – at Steven.

Sara and Steven wake up in the dark and fog in a city devastated by war – and on the run, pursued by armed police, they quickly find shelter. They are in East Berlin in 1966. They hide, and run, but are eventually picked up by the police for having no papers. They are interrogated but can’t say anything – Germans and Russians in 1966 aren’t going to believe they are time travelers. They are jailed but escape. They are captured again. Sara tells Steven they will betray each other, betray the Doctor, just to get the torture to stop. So Steven decides to get ahead of the game and tell the Stasi he and Sara wish to defect. To back up his claim, he hands over a piece of paper with basic scientific information from his own (future) time period.

Sara and Steven are taken by car to a house in the suburbs and told to wait. Sara, meanwhile, every time she and Steven are jailed, is freaked out by hearing a creature and claims to see it outside the house. Steven tells her she’s imagining it. When the Stasi come around, asking questions and offering the two a house and a weekly allowance – Steven suddenly becomes belligerent. He refuses to answer questions. Sara is perplexed.

The two are separated, and when Steven return to Sara, he apologizes and tells her it’s not real – this whole scenario is fake, like the one on the island. And, he tells her – she’s also not real, part of the illusion. Sara screams but fades away. The Doctor, what Sara had seen as a mysterious creature, pulls Steven out of the illusion. They rescue Sara from her dream, which was quite the happy one.

In the TARDIS console room, the Doctor explains they were in cells in the TARDIS – continuing to heal from the collision, and that the time pilots are still in cells. He pilots the TARDIS to the Cobalt Moon, long after all the cobalt is mined, and drops the time pilots off. There is a beautiful pink sea and sky, and a nearby city – the pilots will be fine. The Doctor, Sara, and Steven return to confront the Daleks.

Peter Purves (Steven) and Jean Marsh (Sara) take turns narrating each of the four parts of this adventure, but also play their own characters during the sections that the other is narrating. And Peter also plays the First Doctor. So, this story – with music and sound effects as well, is closer to a full-cast audio drama than the typical, performed, audiobook style of the Companion Chronicles. This is also a good story – plenty of twists and turns, with excellent performances by Peter Purves and Jean Marsh.

Recommended.

Find out more about Big Finish audios at their website: www.bigfinish.com.

Click this link to order The Anachronauts on CD or Download.

Note: No promotional consideration was paid for this review. I review because I enjoy it!

Book Review – Doctor Who: The Guardian of the Solar System

  • Title: The Guardian of the Solar System
  • Series: Doctor Who Companion Chronicles
  • Discs: 1 CD
  • Author: Simon Guerrier
  • Director: Lisa Borrowman
  • Characters: Sara Kingdom, Steven Taylor, First Doctor
  • Cast: Jean Marsh, Niall MacGregor
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 12/08/2016

**Spoiler Alert** The Guardian of the Solar System is the third audio in the Doctor Who Sara Kingdom First Doctor Trilogy. The audio is performed by Jean Marsh as Sara and Niall MacGregor as Robert. I also listened to it about a week ago and this is the first chance I’ve had to sit down and write my review.

Anyway, Sara and Robert have switched places and now Sara is alive and Robert is the spirit of the House – and even though Sara was able to leave the house, she still cannot leave the Island of Ely because there are no boats or other ways off the Island. So again, Sara must tell Robert a story.

Sara tells Robert how she, Steven, and the Doctor landed on her Earth, a year or two before she originally met the Doctor. On Earth, there is a massive Grandfather Clock that is the balance to the hyperspace lanes – it keeps the entire system going and the Earth Empire depends on it for trade and commerce. The hyperspace lanes are essential to Earth. However, the Clock is fed old men – grandfathers, literally. The men work the Clock, and the Clock balances the system. The ticking of the clock underpins the CD, and the sound had started at the end of the previous volume.

Sara does try to change things at first, especially trying to warn her brother, Bret Vyon, but he, of course, doesn’t believe her. Sara also gets an “audience” with Mavic Chen, who explains the importance of the Clock. Sara realizes that, even though the Clock is a great evil, she can’t destroy it – because that will lead to the greater evil of Chen throwing in with the Daleks. But she also sees the inevitability of it all. Sara goes to stop the Doctor and Steven – but she is too late, and they are assisting the old men in their sabotage of the Clock. In the end, the Grandfather Clock is destroyed and the Doctor, Steven, and Sara escape in the TARDIS.

Back at the house, Robert asks what Sara wants … what she wishes for. Then we hear the sounds of the TARDIS landing in the House. And the story ends open-ended, with Sara needing to decide – Will she open the TARDIS door?

I enjoyed this story, and, in fact, the entire trilogy. It’s was wonderful to see a story with Sara Kingdom (especially as “The Daleks’ Masterplan” is one of those stories that no longer exists). The third volume brings in lines and situations from the previous two volumes, sometimes reversing them. In a sense, the entire story is a circle – and I liked that as well. The trilogy is highly, highly recommended, especially for Classic Doctor Who fans.

Please also read my Doctor Who: Home Truths Review.

Please also read my Doctor Who: The Drowned World Review.

Find out more about Big Finish audios at their website: www.bigfinish.com

Click this link to order The Guardian of the Solar System on CD or Download.

Note: No promotional consideration was paid for this review. I review because I enjoy it!

Book Review – Doctor Who: The Drowned World

  • Title: The Drowned World
  • Series: Doctor Who Companion Chronicles
  • Discs: 1 CD
  • Author: Simon Guerrier
  • Director: Lisa Borrowman
  • Characters: Sara Kingdom, Steven Taylor, First Doctor
  • Cast: Jean Marsh, Niall MacGregor
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 12/06/2016

**Spoiler Alert** The middle volume of a trilogy is often an odd duck – it’s a story without a beginning and without an ending, a link in a larger tale. Is it any wonder that the “middle film” or “middle book” is often the poorest rated – yet without it the third story wouldn’t be as strong or popular. The Drowned World doesn’t fall into that trap by being almost stand-alone, except for the framing story. This is the second audio play in the Sara Kingdom trilogy. If you haven’t listened to Home Truths first, do. And you may seriously want to listen to Home Truths before reading this review.

Sometime after the events in Home Truths, Robert returns to the House on the Island, Ely. Sara, the spirit of the house, is waiting for him. Sara cares for Robert, urging him to eat something, and begins to tell him another tale.

The TARDIS lands in a tilted laboratory. From the beginning, it’s clear something is horribly wrong – everything in the lab is askew, bolted tables, chairs, and equipment hanging off the walls, the door on the ceiling, and a lake of silvery water filling the room. As the First Doctor, Steven, and Sara exit, the TARDIS slips from its precarious position and falls below into the water. Sara, telling the story to Robert, remarks she felt very grateful she had thought to close the TARDIS door. The lab is part of a mining colony on an asteroid – the miners are in trouble, their atmosphere generator has been damaged and they won’t have enough air to last until the rescue party arrives. The Doctor immediately sets to work fixing the oxygen generator. Meanwhile, Sara and Steven work with three miners to pull the TARDIS out of the lake. The rope they try to use to rescue the TARDIS melts in the water as if it was acid. One of the assisting miners is killed. The other miners, Steven, and Sara are attacked by the living water, literally – an alien being with the appearance of water. To escape the attack, the rising water, and prevent the deadly water from flooding the rest of the colony, it’s Sara who slams shut the door and locks it. It’s also Sara who breaks open the portal to outside – taking the group to the surface of the asteroid. Unfortunately, though they make it to the airlock they can’t get the door open from the outside. Sara crosses back to the deadly water-logged room to tell the Doctor and the other miners of the colony that they need to let everyone in. Sara’s message is heard, the group rescued, but Sara is still trapped – and dies.

In dying, Sara communes with the water-being. She discovers that the mining is destroying the water beings and poisoning the asteroid. Then she is let go. Sara recovers and convinces the miners to abandon the colony when the rescue ship arrives. Yet, as she tells Robert – she knows that she only delayed the inevitable. The rock held valuable minerals – sooner or later the unique beings living there would be destroyed to get to those minerals.

That is the story-within-the-story, the framing story connects with Home Truths and The Guardian of the Solar System. As it concludes, Robert’s motivations become clear – it wants something from Sara, something she isn’t sure she can grant – but if she does, there is a price to be paid. And this leads into the final volume of the trilogy.

Sara is played, wonderfully, by Jean Marsh (Sara Kingdom in Doctor Who “The Daleks’ Masterplan”; Morgaine in Doctor Who “Battlefield”; and Rose the Lady’s Maid in the original Upstairs, Downstairs). Robert is played by Niall MacGregor. The Drowned World is written by Simon Guerrier and directed by Lisa Bowerman.

Find out more about Big Finish audios at their website: www.bigfinish.com

Click this link to order The Drowned World on CD or Download.

Note: No promotional consideration was paid for this review. I review because I enjoy it!

Book Review – Doctor Who: Home Truths

  • Title: Home Truths
  • Series: Doctor Who Companion Chronicles
  • Discs: 1 CD
  • Author: Simon Guerrier
  • Director: Lisa Borrowman
  • Characters: Sara Kingdom, Steven Taylor, First Doctor
  • Cast: Jean Marsh, Niall MacGregor
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 11/24/2016

Home Truths is a haunted house story. No really – it really is. And it’s a incredibly well-constructed one that works particularly well on audio. I can see this one becoming an annual Halloween favorite. Home Truths begins with the First Doctor (as played by William Hartnell in the original Doctor Who television series), Sara Kingdom, and Steven Taylor landing the TARDIS inside a house. Yes, inside the house – wherein becomes the problem, because they can’t leave by the traditional method – the door, the house has been well and truly sealed. And if you’re wondering how a companion could be traveling around with the Doctor when she’s mostly famous for dying (opps, sorry, spoiler there – but we are talking about a character death from 1966, ok, 50 years – that’s well enough time to not need a spoiler warning) – it turns out that Sara per canon did travel in the extremely unreliable TARDIS for awhile. Anyway, the trio alight the TARDIS and almost immediately stumble over the dead body of a woman, and later, a young man. The deserted house is strewn with wedding presents, most not even unwrapped. The Doctor starts to figure out the mystery when a glass of water appears near his hand, and he remarks that he was thinking about how he’d like some water. But it’s Sara who makes a mistake – placing her hand in a hand-shaped groove near the near from the kitchen. Sara had thought it was a door control, similar to the security panels in her own time. But Sara’s innocent action will have far-reaching consequences – that stretch into the two sequels that follow this story, The Drowned World, and The Guardian of the Solar System.

Eventually, the Doctor, with some help from Sara and Steven solves the mystery – which I’m not going to reveal, though the truth is quite horrifying. I’m also not going to reveal here what effect Sara’s innocent action would have. The story is also framed as an interview between the mysterious “Robert”, a policeman of sorts, and Sara, who narrates the story.

Sara is played, wonderfully, by Jean Marsh (Sara Kingdom in Doctor Who “The Daleks Masterplan”; Morgaine in Doctor Who “Battlefield”; and Rose the Lady’s Maid in the original Upstairs, Downstairs). Robert is played by Niall MacGregor. Home Truths is written by Simon Guerrier and directed by Lisa Bowerman.

Find out more about Big Finish audios at their website: www.bigfinish.com

Click this link to order Home Truths on CD or Download.

Note: No promotional consideration was paid for this review. I review because I enjoy it!