Book Review – Star Trek Green Lantern vol. 2: Stranger Worlds

  • Title: Star Trek/Green Lantern vol. 2: Stranger Worlds
  • Author: Mike Johnson
  • Artist: Angel Hernandez, Mark Roberts, Andworld Design
  • Characters: Capt. Kirk, Dr. McCoy, Spock, Scotty, Uhura, Chekov (ST 2009); Hal Jordan, John Stewart, Guy Gardner, Kilowog, Carol Ferris, Guardians, Saint Walker, Sinestro, Khan, LarFleeze, Atrocitus, Manhunters, Klingons
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Publisher: IDW Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 10/27/2017

Stranger Worlds picks up where the previous volume, Spectrum War left off, with the Lanterns learning to adapt to life in the Star Trek film reboot universe. Hal Jordan, John Stewart, Kilowog, and even Guy Gardner have a problem – with no individual lanterns and no Great Power Battery their rings cannot be re-charged, and they are running out of power. Hal and Carol Ferris are now members of Starfleet but not together. Carol, in fact, has joined the engineering department and fallen for Montgomery Scott. However, Carol can still become a Star Sapphire by using her ring, but has the same problem as the other Lanterns – she’s running out of power. John, Kilowog, and Guy are on Earth, but are soon called in to help Star Fleet.

Before long, Sinestro and Atrocitus show up. Atrocitus finds Khan (the Benedict Cumberbatch Khan from the reboot film) by landing on the asteroid where he and his Augments were put in suspended animation. Sinestro discovers the Manhunters and wants them to lead him to Oa so he can find the yellow impurity in the Great Lantern Power Battery and impose an empire of Fear. Khan, on the other hand, takes Atrocitus’ red power ring but can’t seem to use it. When he kills Atrocitus, he is then able to use the Ring of Anger with it’s full power.

The Enterprise crew, discovering the Manhunters, and learning their history from the Lanterns, must decide if they will go to Earth to stop Khan and his genetic augments or go to Oa. Hal Jordan convinces Kirk and Spock that Sinestro is the bigger threat.

The Enterprise and the Lanterns reach Oa. The Guardians exists, and are in very early days for their researches into the color spectrum and harnessing it’s power. Sinestro attempts to take and corrupt the power battery. He fails. The Green Lanterns recite their oath – and the rings are fully charged. They also swear to find the other power batteries. Something which should be much easier, now that they have found the Guardians. The Guardians will start a new Green Lantern Corps.

In the concluding pages of the volume, Hal offers to lead Kirk to an uncharted star system with a big, red, sun.

I enjoyed Stranger Worlds. The Star Trek and Green Lantern universes mesh well together. The art for this volume, especially the full-page spreads, is beautiful. The characterizations are also very well done, especially considering how large the cast is. I hope that IDW continues to publish additional volumes in this series, because I would certainly read them.

The previous volume was concerned with introductions and set-up. This particular volume is concerned with normalizing the situation – getting the Lanterns their power back, fighting the negative rings again (the orange ring of Larfleeze and the Red Ring used by Khan are captured and put in stasis to keep them from being used by anyone). Khan himself is defeated. Sinestro, not so much, but he fails to turn the Green Power Battery into a yellow one. St. Walker is mentioned, and has been captured, and finding him and helping him recover is sure to be grounds for another story. No mention is made of the Enterprise crew members that were chosen by other rings in the previous volume. There are situations in this volume that are a bit confusing here and there, but overall it is a fun tie-in SF story and highly recommended.

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Book Review – Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War

  • Title: Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War
  • Author: Mike Johnson
  • Artist: Angel Hernandez, Alejandro Sanchez, Neil Uyetake
  • Characters: Capt. Kirk, Dr. McCoy, Spock, Scotty, Uhura, Chekov (ST 2009); Hal Jordan, Carol Ferris, Saint Walker, Green Lanterns, Sinestro, LarFleeze, Atrocitus, Klingons, Romulans, Gorn
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Publisher: IDW Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 07/10/2017

Star Trek Green Lantern: The Spectrum War crosses the 2009 Star Trek movie with Green Lantern. In DC Comics’ continuity this takes place immediately after Blackest Night. Ganthet enacts the Last Light – sending himself, six power rings, and all the living Lanterns to another universe. And that universe is the Star Trek (reboot) movie universe. After enacting Last Light, the Enterprise finds Ganthet’s skeleton on an airless rogue planet. The skeleton is surrounded by the six rings. The away team takes the skeleton and rings to the Enterprise, where Dr. McCoy makes the rather obvious statement that, “He’s dead, Jim,” however, McCoy also notes that Ganthet is from an unknown species. Meanwhile, Scotty and his friend investigate the rings – exposing them to tachyon radiation. This activates the power rings – three find new people to wield them on the Enterprise, while the other three speed off into space. Chekov is chosen by the Blue Ring of Hope. Dr. McCoy is chosen by the Indigo Ring of Compassion. Uhura is chosen by the Pink Ring of Love and becomes a new Star Sapphire. Then Hal Jordan arrives.

Jordan begins to explain what is going on to Kirk and company. Meanwhile, the other rings have also found new hosts. The Red Ring of Rage choses a Gorn. The Orange Ring of Greed (Avarice) chooses a Romulan. And the Yellow Ring of Fear chooses a Klingon. We also discover that Sinestro, LarFleeze, and Atrocitus have arrived in the Star Trek universe. They find the new members of their respective corps, but insist on being in charge of the new ring wielders.

Meanwhile, Jordan knows the three negative rings have found new owners, so he theorizes that any living Lanterns would have been thrust into the new universe. Star Sapphire Carol Ferris arrives with Saint Walker, who is injured. Dr. McCoy attempts to treat Saint Walker. Carol confirms that Nekkon has also made it into the new universe. And Jordan explains to Kirk that the Lanterns lost their last battle with Nekkon through attrition. In the end, his universe was destroyed.

The Klingons, led by Sinestro attack a Starbase – as does Atrocitus and the Gorn. The Enterprise tries to protect the Starbase – and rescue the survivors – but even with the help of the Lanterns, including the few surviving Green Lanterns, the Enterprise cannot hold off the energy weapons of the Yellow and Red Lanterns. After rescuing the survivors of the Starbase, and receiving strange signals from Vulcan – Kirk orders a strategic retreat.

Nekkon has raised Vulcan from destruction, and it’s citizens, including Spock’s parents are now zombies. Both the Lanterns, especially Hal, and the Enterprise crew realize there isn’t much to be done, and Hal fears this new universe will be destroyed like his home one. However, Kirk asks how they defeated Nekkon the first time. Hal tells the story of Kyle Raynor, the White Lantern, who could combine the power of all the rings in the Emotional Spectrum to create the Life Entity who can destroy Nekkon. While Hal destroys Spock’s (zombie) parents for him, Spock then uses the Life Entity to destroy Nekkon. Without Nekkon, Vulcan is again destroyed, as the Enterprise crew watches from space, with the Lanterns. Meanwhile, without any protection from space – the Klingon, Romulan, and Gorn die in space without their rings. Hal, Carol, Saint Walker, and the other Lanterns stay in the Star Trek universe, each making their own decisions about how to fit in in their new home.

This is a very enjoyable book. All the characters are in character, and there is a lot of humor. I really liked how it’s pointed out that Hal Jordan and Capt. Kirk are a lot alike. The art is wonderful, with the characters looking very much like the actors from the Star Trek movies and the DC characters looking just as they should. I really liked the full-page covers and the alternate covers in the back of the book. The only negative is at times, this book feels like there are too many characters, so at times it’s a little hard to follow. But the writing and situations feel very much like those in the Star Trek movie universe, and the Green Lantern mythology is very well explained and handled. Highly recommended.

Star Trek The Animated Series Review

  • Series Title: Star Trek:  The Animated Series
  • Season:  The Complete Series
  • Date:  1973 – 1975
  • Episodes:  22
  • Discs:  4
  • Cast: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Majel Barrett
  • Original Network:  NBC
  • Production Network:  Paramount; Filmation Animation

Star Trek: The Animated Series (ST:TAS) does manage to feel like original Classic Trek, especially towards the end of it’s run. The main drawback to this series is the animation – it’s Filmation, not the best animation company, and it’s very flat. Now animation is much better than this – but even back when ST:TAS was made there were other companies and other countries that produced much better animation. Also the early episodes in ST:TAS often are remakes or sequels to episodes of the original series. As the Animated Series moves on, though, the stories become more original, and by the end of the animated episodes there are a number of pretty good episodes – or at least good ideas.

The second criticism for this series is it is a kids’ version of Star Trek. I wouldn’t really say it’s “dumbed down” (because among other things I hate that phrase). But especially the early episodes seem to play for laughs and for children. Later episodes improved a bit and ST:TAS felt more like the Classic Trek we know. The series does feature the cast from the original series, with the notable exception of Walter Keonig (Chekov) who gets to actually write an episode – so that’s something. The navigator is Mr. Arex – an intelligent being with three hands. We don’t learn much about Arex, a missed opportunity, but I did like him. We also occasionally see a Catperson as Communications Officer instead of Uhura. However, Nichelle Nichols, Majel Barrett, and James Doohan all did extra voices according to the special features on the set’s last disc. At times you can tell a “guest” voice is Nichelle or Majel or George Takei, which can be distracting. On the other hand, the actors were given a chance to show their range – and all did an excellent job playing various aliens.

The aliens on the show were some of the most inventive we’ve seen on Star Trek (though, flat, because: Filmation). But it was nice to see Star Trek doing aliens that looked alien and alien vistas that didn’t look like Southern California or a Paramount back lot. The entire Animated Series also manages to stay away from dipping in to the Paramount Studios cast offs which were so common on the Classic Series (which did Rome/Greece several times, as well as Nazi Germany, and 1930s Chicago Gangsters). It was nice to get away from the lack of originality of visiting historic Earth periods in Outer Space.

One of my favorite episodes was “The Eye of the Beholder”, Kirk and Company were investigating the disappearance of a Federation scientific team – only to discover the planet was a zoo belonging to a highly evolved species – and the previous crew were taken as exhibits (as were Kirk and his beam-down team). But I liked the aliens which looked like purple and pink snails – but were more intelligent and scientifically advanced than Kirk and company. “Albatross” has Dr. McCoy arrested for murder, because after he administered a common vaccine – the entire planet succumbed to plague. McCoy angsts about whether he made some soft of ghastly mistake, while Kirk and Spock travel to the planet to figure out what happened. It’s a good medical mystery, not immediately obvious (other than McCoy’s non-guilt of course) and I liked the cooperation between Spock, McCoy, and the aliens of the episode. There are other good stories here too, so the show is worth watching.

Sherlock, Star Trek, Time Travel, & Pon Farr

bakerstreetbabes:

sherlocknyc:

So we just had an experienced Sherlockian / Trekkie (original trekkie/ sherlockian of many years) ask Lyndsay Faye if there could ever be a story where Pon Farr and a time traveling space ship is how Sherlock Holmes came to be.

Excuse me but this is an amazing convention.

#slowclap

OK – I had to read that three times to figure it out, but, man… yes.  Doesn’t explain Mycroft though.

Star Trek: Into Darkness – Movie Theater Advertising

cumberbatchweb:

cumberbuddy:

ivanessens:

Sold.

#STID new Ads! It looks bloody gorgeous!

New Star Trek Into Darkness US one sheet & banner. Absolutely love the new banner!

Love the banner – even though it reminds me of both Star Trek III the Search for Spock, and the Challenger disaster. (Yeah, I’m sure they didn’t intend that second one, and probably not the first either).