Crisis on Earth-X Review

  • Series: The Flash, Arrow, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow
  • Third Arrowverse Crossover Special: Crisis on Earth-X
  • Episodes: 4
  • Discs: 1
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Stephen Amell, Melissa Benoist, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Emily Bett Rickards, Victor Garber, Caity Lotz, Chyler Leigh, Franz Drameh, Paul Blackthorne, Jeremy Jordan, Wentworth Miller, Russell Tovey
  • Network: CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

Barry and Supergirl arrive, and a few moments later Green Arrow pulls up on a motorcycle, “Just a quick reminder, super speed – I don’t have it.” – Oliver Queen, the Green Arrow

“My grandparents didn’t survive the Holocaust so the world could be ruled by Nazis. So if you want Kara, you gotta’ go through me and even if you do, you’re not going to win. Because we will not back down, we will keep fighting. So get the hell off our Earth while you still can.” – Felicity.

Just like DC Comics occasionally does crossovers between two or more books, and all their characters live in the same “universe”, from the very beginning all the “Arrowverse” shows have been clearly in the same universe, and even though Kara Danvers (Supergirl) is on another Earth, she has met Barry Allen (the Flash) and company before, and the characters from Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow in the previous crossover, “Invasion”. “Crisis on Earth-X” starts innocently enough, with all our characters gathered together for Barry and Iris’s wedding. But just as their minister gets to the part about, “Does anyone object to the marriage of this couple?” Nazis burst in and a huge fight erupts. All of our heroes use their powers to fight off the Nazis, despite being dressed for a wedding. It’s total chaos.

Dr. Harry Wells explains that there is a 53rd Earth, beyond the known 52 Earths of the Multiverse. It’s a place so awful, it’s only known as Earth-X because no one would want to travel there. It’s the Earth where the Nazis won World War II. To make matters worse, in this version, Oliver’s doppelganger is the current führer of the Nazi-world and his wife is Overgirl, an evil Nazi version of Supergirl. First, evil Oliver and Evil Supergirl and their soldiers break into a lab and steal a prism, and then they come after Supergirl. Their plan? Well, Overgirl is dying after being exposed to too much sunlight so they’ve come to Earth One to kill Supergirl, take her heart, and implant it in Overgirl – because Supergirl would be the perfect donor. The Nazis manage to take over Star Labs and send half of our large group of Heroes to Earth-X and the rest are locked up in the pipeline. They miss Felicity and Iris though, who manage to be badass in trying to rescue everyone. Felicity and Iris also send a distress call to the Legends.

On Earth-X, Oliver, Barry, Alex Danvers, and company are locked in a cage with others in black and white striped convict clothes, with badges pinned to their chests. They meet Ray, and when Jax asks what he “did wrong” to be locked up, Ray responds, “I loved the wrong person”. Alex and Sara, who shared a one night stand the night before the ill-fated wedding, look knowingly at each other. The doppelganger of Captain Lance arrives and separates out our heroes and Ray, and leads them to a trench, they are told to stand on the edge, and a firing squad is readied. But at the last minute, Leonard Snart (“Leo”) arrives and rescues them all. They are taken to the base camp of the Freedom Fighters and meet General Winn Schott. The good – they are now in with a group that’s organized to fight and overthrow the Nazis. The bad? Their main plan is to destroy the Nazis’ new doomsday weapon, which happens to be housed with the interworld transport terminal that’s the only way for the Legends to get home. They also discover Ray is actually from Earth 1 and he and Leo are partners.

On Earth-X, the heroes need to convince Winn to give them a shot at getting to the portal before Winn uses a secret weapon of his own to blow it up. Meanwhile, on Earth One, Iris and Felicity are trying to get Cisco and anyone else locked in the Pipeline free, and stop Reverse Flash (who is in league with Evil Oliver and Overgirl) from killing Supergirl. They delay the operation that would kill Kara by turning off the power. When Felicity is caught, she tries to stand up to Thawne, but he threatens to kill her, and she gives up the encryption code for getting the power on. Thawne again ties Kara down under Red Light lamps to weaken her, but just as he’s about to cut her open, Ray, the Atom, stops him. The rest of the Legends – The Atom, Amaya, Zari, and Nate have arrived. They get everyone out of the Pipeline and rescue Kara. Everyone else returns from Earth-X, but Martin was shot during the mission to get to the inter-Earth Gateway. Martin Stein is dying, and because he is linked with Jefferson, he is dying also. Cisco, however, had designed, with help from Caitlin, a serum that would safely separate Martin and Jefferson but at the cost of the loss of their powers. Martin takes the serum as he lies dying in the Waverider’s med bay, to save Jefferson.

Even though everyone has returned to Earth One safely, except for Martin, and they’ve rescued Kara. Reverse-Flash is still determined to use their Nazi Waverider to launch an invasion of Earth One and Evil Oliver is still determined to kill Supergirl to save Overgirl. They also discover that not only will Overgirl’s overexposure to sunlight kill her, but she’s a living bomb who will explode with the power of a neutron bomb. Part four largely consists of major fight scenes, and a money shot of all the heroes, in costume, just all-out fighting back against a troop of black and red uniformed Nazis. Nazis who have just stormed a city block, randomly killing anyone they come across. Everyone has their part in the fight. Iris and our Wells are on the Waverider fighting the Nazi one but can’t get through their shields. Supergirl teases Overgirl out to fight, and Overgirl breaks through a window in her own ship, this allows Killer Frost, Amaya and Zari access into the ship to fight Nazis, take it over, and then lower the shields. Vibe arrives to transport them off just in time before the ship is destroyed by the Waverider’s missiles. Kara takes Overgirl Up, Up, and Away, so she can safely explode. Evil Oliver is devastated by the loss of his wife. Oliver kills his evil doppelganger.

Our heroes clean up against the Nazis and exile them back to Earth-X. Everyone attends Martin’s funeral, then one by one, or in small groups, they head back to their own homes. The Ray returns to Earth-X, but Snart decides to stay on Earth One for a short time. Barry brings Diggle to a lakeside park and he marries not only Iris and Barry but Felicity and Oliver.

On the one hand, “Crisis on Earth-X” has some very satisfying moments – superheroes and their human non-powered companions punching Nazis and being badass (especially Iris, Felicity, Alex, and Sara all get to have some great moments. When they finally arrive, Zari and Amaya aren’t left out of the girl power fun.) But the entire crossover is fight-heavy and at times plot light. There is some horrific imagery, but also moments of pure power and generosity such as our Oliver breaking his impersonation of his evil self to save the Earth-X Felicity and Felicity herself standing up to the Nazis that invade Star Labs. Evil Oliver though has an almost understandable goal – to save his wife, whom he clearly loves – Overgirl. Still, his plan, to kill Kara to save Overgirl is horrific. And one has to wonder how he knew to find Supergirl on Earth One since she normally lives on Earth 38. Also, once most of our characters are on Earth-X, their one mission is to return home. General Winn Schott is incredibly stubborn about wanting to destroy the inter-Earth portal before everyone can return home. And Flash and the Ray end up destroying his weapon, which turns out to be Red Tornado, so you have to wonder what that did to Schott’s resistance. But overall, considering the logistics of having so many characters, even in a four-hour special, and giving all of them screen time and stories, the crossover works. I also really, really liked The Ray (Russell Tovey of the original British Being Human) and cuddly Leonard Snart (Wentworth Miller).

Note: Over-exposure to sunlight giving Superman cancer, or at least a sort of cancer, is the plot of All-Star Superman.

Note 2: The first episode opens with a brief preview of Earth-X, which has red skies and yellow lightning, a reference perhaps to the future Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Note 3: Crisis on Earth-X, all four parts, is included in full on the Blu-Ray edition of Season 3 of Legends of Tomorrow. The individual DVD box sets of Arrow (Season 6), Supergirl (Season 3), The Flash (Season 4), and Legends (Season 3), on the other hand, only include their individual episode of the crossover.

The Flash Season 5 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 5
  • Episodes: 22
  • Discs: 5
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Hartley Sawyer, Jessica Parker Kennedy
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

This review contains spoilers for Season 5 of The Flash.

The mysterious young girl who appeared at the end of Season 4 of The Flash is Nora West-Allen, Barry and Iris’s daughter from the future. She’s traveled to the past to meet and spend time with her father who has been missing most of her life and to stop Cicada, a villain that the Flash never caught. To solve the mystery of Cicada, the team at S.T.A.R. Labs brings in Sherloque Wells from another Earth – the best detective in the multiverse. Sherloque is French, a good detective, and initially not good with people – he’s also been married seven times and has five ex-wives, so he likes being paid for his work so he can keep up with his alimony payments.

Season 5 has Nora building her relationship with her parents, she initially doesn’t get along with Iris but they work things out, and the season also has the season trying to stop Cicada. Sherloque tells them who Cicada is – but due to Nora’s interference in the timeline not only is this Cicada killing different victims – it’s a different person. It turns out a man named, Dwyer, who works in a chemical plant, became the guardian of a little girl named Grace after her parents were killed in an accident. Dwyer initially has no idea how to raise a child, but he grows to love Grace and tries to be a good parent to her. The night of the Enlightenment when Barry and Nora break up the satellite and sent dark-matter infused shards to Earth, Dwyer and Grace are at a street carnival. A dagger-shaped shard hits Dwyer and Grace is knocked on to the concrete and ends-up in a coma. Dwyer, with the help of a very prejudiced doctor, decides that meta-humans were to blame for Grace’s coma and her parents’ death and that all metas are dangerous and therefore evil. Dwyer decides that all meta-humans must die and becomes the serial killer, Cicada.

The season has Team Flash, including Sherloque, working to solve this mystery – Who is Cicada? How can they stop him? As in any long-form mystery, they gradually discover clues and information about the case. Cicada himself is a meta and using the dagger he can dampen the powers of other metas – this makes Barry and company helpless when they fight him. The season also has Cisco and Caitlyn developing a cure for meta powers. They insist the cure will not be used as a weapon, but that only people who choose to do so will cure their meta-human powers. Barry suggests using the cure on Cicada, but Cisco and Caitlyn insist they have to give Cicada a choice. They also discover that the reason Grace didn’t wake up from her coma is that she has a piece of the satellite embedded in her forehead, flooding her body with dark matter and making her a meta who can steal powers from other metas.

Team Flash is able to capture Cicada and offer him the cure. When they explain Grace is a meta, he agrees to take the cure if Grace gets it too. Dwyer also insists that the doctor he’s been working with administer the cure. But when they try, a second Cicada breaks into S.T.A.R. labs. She kills the doctor. Team Flash has to reset and figure out who this new Cicada is. Nora travels back to the future to speak to her up to now unseen partner – it’s Eobard Thawne who is on death row. Sherloque has been trying to solve the case of Nora West-Allen throughout the season, and when Nora is about to admit she’s working with Thawne, Sherloque interrupts her and tells the team she’s working with Thawne. Barry flips out and takes Nora back to the future. Iris and Ralph use a Time Bubble to travel to the future to talk to Nora and bring her back, but when she realizes Barry isn’t there – she gets so angry she uses Thawne’s last lesson and disappears into the Negative Speed Force. Back in 2019, she gathers together a group of young, female rogues and robs a military weapons research lab to steal a mirror gun that will destroy Cicada’s dagger.

Nora and Barry repair their relationship and the team refocuses on stopping Cicada II (a future version of Grace). Sherloque also meets and falls for Rene Adler, Earth 1’s version of Irene Adler (all his wives are Irene Adler’s from different Earths). Cisco meets a photographer in a bar named Kamilla and starts dating her. Joe West and DA Cecille Horton raise their new baby girl. Wally is in a few episodes at the beginning of the season, then goes on sabbatical in Tibet and isn’t seen again, though he’s mentioned a couple of times.

Team Flash discovers Cicada II has a weapon that will kill all the metas, not only in Central City but in the US. Sherloque sends Rene to his Earth to keep her safe. CCPD, under the direction of Joe West, organizes a mass distribution of the cure. Team Flash tries to stop Cicada and destroy the dagger, stop Cicada’s cure-bomb, and even convince Grace to take the cure – but the cure doesn’t work because of the dark matter shard in her head. They eventually wake up Grace and manage to stop her from becoming Cicada.

However, Barry also wants to stop Thawne and when the dagger is destroyed, instead of being led to his execution (in 2049), he escapes. Also, the timeline changes catch up to everyone and Nora is wiped from existence and the Crisis which had been predicted for 2024 is moved up to 2019. Barry Allen will disappear in the Crisis.

I really liked Sherloque Wells – he’s an element of lightness in what could have been a very depressing season. Nora is earnest, and makes a lot of mistakes – and she didn’t deserve her fate. I hope that’s reversed in next year’s crossover.

This season includes Elseworlds – a crossover that is so much fun it deserves its own review. After Elseworlds, we are promised that next’s year’s crossover will be Crisis on Infinite Earths. Crisis was a massive DC Comics crossover, the first of its kind in the industry, and a story in which heroes died and nothing was the same. Read my review of the graphic novel Crisis on Infinite Earths.

Read my Review of The Flash Season 1.
Read my Review of The Flash Season 2.
Read my Review of The Flash Season 3.
Read my Review of The Flash Season 4.

The Flash Book One (by Geoff Johns) Review

  • Title: The Flash Book One
  • Author: Geoff Johns
  • Artists: Angel Unzueta, Scott Kolins, Ethan Van Sciver, Doug Hazlewood, Prentis Rollins, Tom McCraw, James Sinclair, Gasper Saladino, John Costanza
  • Line: Post-Crisis on Infinite Earths and Pre-Final Crisis
  • Collection Info: Collects The Flash 164-176 and The Flash: Iron Heights (2000-2001) 
  • Characters: Wally West, Linda Park (West), Rogues
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 11/10/2018

**Spoiler Alert** The Flash Book One collects a year of The Flash comic book (and a special) from 2000-2001, so it contains several multi-issue stories. The first story starts with a bang with Wally West’s Flash arriving in what he eventually figures out is a mirror universe, where there was no Flash – no Jay Garrick Golden Age Flash, no Barry Allen Silver Age Flash, and no Wally West Modern Age Flash. As a result, there are no other heroes – the members of the Justice Society and Justice League of America having been killed or forced into retirement. Keystone City has a zero-tolerance policy against all masks both Rogues and Heroes. West finds himself in jail, drugged by a “counselor” and then rescued by Captian Cold. Wally, Cold, and Mirror Master end-up having to work together to get out of the Mirror Universe before it collapses in on itself. They eventually succeed, only to find Keystone City missing when they return.

Mirror Master helps Wally and Capt. Cold to figure out what’s happened to Keystone City. While they were captured inside Linda’s wedding ring, Keystone was shifted into another dimension. Mirror Master gets them there and they end up in a fairy-tale like alternate universe. Wally had been there once before as Kid Flash with Barry Allen as the Flash. Wally discovers the current king of this fairyland holds quite a grudge. It seems when he and Barry last visited, he told the young, artistic prince he could “do whatever he wanted” rather than be king. So after the kingdom rose up and defeated the tyrant king, the young prince made his younger brother king, only to have his brother become a worse tyrant than the old king. This new king also launched wars that killed off much of the population of the kingdom. Wally tries to explain that the prince, who is now king, missed the point, but the king decides to execute him anyway to get even. Cold and Mirror Master try to leave but they discover they are now trapped. Jay Garrick, the Golden Age Flash arrives – first he’s bounced from Grimm, but then he returns. The Flash (Wally) is able to borrow some of Jay’s speed and give it to Cold and Mirror Master. They work together to break the spells and return to Keystone City to where it belongs, with everyone back to normal rather than believing they are their alternate selves.

The next story starts with some background information on Keystone City, an industrial blue-collar city that works hard and plays harder. An old girlfriend of Wally’s shows up but before he can talk to her about their break-up, she’s murdered. Magenta, another old girlfriend of Wally’s, who happens to be an unstable Meta, also returns. However, she seems to have calmed down a lot. Meanwhile, the Keystone City police are dealing with a serial killer. It takes a while to figure out the pattern, but it turns out that everyone who died was at one point in their lives saved by the Flash. The killer is Cicada, and he leads a cult of people saved by the Flash who are now some sort of religious cult. Cicada convinces his followers to offer themselves as a sacrifice and he wants to gather enough energy to bring his wife back from the dead. Oh, and due to a lightning strike, Cicada is immortal. The Flash is able to finally send Cicada to Iron Heights. But it turns out that Julie, the cop who once dated Wally had a baby.

There’s a one-issue story of the Flash verses Tarpit in which Wally quickly defeats the new foe.

As Wally deals with the death of Julie, and the possibility of being the father of her baby, Weather Wizard goes on the attack in Keystone – and he says the child is his. But Weather Wizard only wants to control the child because he thinks the child can control the weather without a weather wand. The Flash defeats Weather Wizard and he and Linda decide they need to figure out what to do with Julie’s baby.

At Iron Heights, Warden Wolfe is not simply tough – he’s corrupt, and he’s torturing Metas, but when a mutated virus makes it way through the prison, killing prisoners and guards alike – he needs to reach out to the police for help. Wally, Pied Piper (who has reformed), and Jay Garrick rush to the prison. Jay will work on an antidote in the lab, while Wally investigates and tries to find the original contagion in the prison. Wally finds evidence of corruption and torture in the prison and he’s exposed himself. He does discover the source of the virus though and gets it to Jay in time for an antidote to be made. He also informs the police of Wolfe’s abuses. The prisoners and guards that didn’t die in the initial attack are saved with a vaccine. But a few of the Flash’s Rogues escape and form a group called, “The New Rogues”.

I enjoyed The Flash Book One there’s a variety of story types, and the writing is solid. Wally is a fun character, but here, having taken over the mantle of the Flash from his Uncle Barry who died in the line of duty – he’s a bit more serious. Even though this is an older book, I still recommend it, it is a great introduction to the Wally West Modern Age Flash.

Book Review – Titans vol. 2: Made in Manhattan

  • Title: Titans vol. 2: Made in Manhattan
  • Author: Dan Abnett and James Asmus
  • Artists: Brett Booth, Norm Rapmund, Minkyu Jung, Lee Weeks, Reilly Brown, Scott Hanna, Andrew Dalhouse, Adriano Lucas, John Kalisz, Tony Aviña, Carlos M. Mangual, Corey Breen, Josh Reed
  • Line: Rebirth
  • Characters: Titans, Wally West, Nightwing (Dick Grayson), Wonder Girl (Donna Troy), Tempest (Garth), Omen (Lilith), Arsenal (Roy Harper), Bumblebee (Karen Duncan)
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 09/23/2018

Volume 2 of Titans in DC Comics’ Rebirth continuity starts off in the middle of a fight scene. The Titans (Nightwing, The Flash (Wally West), Donna Troy, Omen (Lilith), Arsenal) are fighting a big guy determined to tear-up New York and disagreeing with each other about how to do it. However, Arsenal manages to trip him up, without destroying any buildings, though a couple of parked cars are flattened (to Wally’s chagrin). Superman arrives but the Titans have taken care of everything. Superman lets slip that it’s “good to see Wally again” then runs off.

Wally runs after him. Superman and Wally talk, and it turns out that Superman also remembers the pre-Crisis / pre-Flashpoint universe that Wally comes from. He encourages Wally to fight for his old girlfriend, Linda Park, who currently doesn’t even remember him.

Meanwhile, Bumblebee (Karen Duncan) and Mal Duncan head to Meta solutions to find out more about Bumblebee’s new powers. Meta Solutions promises to remove unwanted meta powers and to help metas train to learn how to control their powers if they want to keep them. While Karen talks to Psimon (who claims he is now reformed) Mal waits in the waiting room. When Mal sees Mammoth arrive he has a panic attack. Omen (Lilith) recognizes his panic and the Teen Titans arrive. Psimon had Karen try on a suit (costume) to measure her powers and control them. Karen loves her new Bumblebee suit and powers. When the Titans arrive they run into the Fearsome Five – who claim they are “good guys now”, having given up their powers and in the case of Psimon dedicating himself to helping others, especially other new metahumans.

Later, Wally tells Nightwing that the man they fought earlier who had Mammoth’s powers, previously had no priors and no metahuman powers. They discover a black market in superpowers – superpowers that Meta Solutions is siphoning from other metahumans.

Returning to Meta Solutions, the Titans confront the “former” Fearsome Five – only to discover they were lying about giving up their powers. There’s a big fight, but Bumblebee arrives in her costume and in control of her powers and rescues everyone. Karen is disappointed to learn though that her husband gave up his powers.

In a special holiday issue, Arsenal invites the Titans to Times Square for the New Year’s Eve ball drop – but they end up fighting a pair of metas instead. They manage to get the two thieves to drive their car into the harbor where they are rounded-up by Tempest. Arsenal explains that New Year’s is special to him because having struggled with addiction (he was a heroin addict) he now sees each new year as a new beginning and a chance to further improve his life. The Titans then realize how important it was to Roy to spend time with them on a day that he considers special in a personal way.

In Titans Legacy – four Titans and their four mentors find themselves stuck in a box together. Nightwing, Batman, Donna, Wonder Woman, Wally, The Flash (Barry Allen), Tempest, and Aquaman are actually at first suspicious – wondering if someone is a ringer. They then realize they need to work together to discover how they ended up in the box, who locked them up, and how to get out. Wonder Woman is especially cold towards Donna. A couple of challenges are thrown into the box to fight our heroes and keep them busy, first Metallo (who is a copy and not the original) and then a group of Parademons (also projections). But throughout these fights, and Batman trying to figure a way out, Wonder Woman and Donna are having issues. When Batman scans everyone, Donna doesn’t register as human. Wonder Woman explains Donna was made from clay, brought to life, and given false memories and history. Donna is completely broken by this revelation. She’s so hurt, despite Diana’s apologies, her mental anguish reaches Omen who is able to call in rescue troops, including the Justice League. They discover the Key was behind the abductions but he escapes into a metaphysical door.

This was a very fast read, with enjoyable characters and a good team. I like Nightwing, Flash (Wally) and Arsenal together – they are good friends and work together. Omen and Donna are new to me but their characterizations were clear and it easy to see how they fit. I also liked Tempest. I recommend this series.

Also, read my review of Titans vol. 1: The Return of Wally West.

The Flash Season 4 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 4
  • Episodes: 23
  • Discs: 5
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Hartley Sawyer
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

Season Four of The Flash opens with Barry having been trapped in the Speed Force for six months with Iris in charge of the new “Team Kid Flash”. But when Wally is challenged by a Samari who demands to see the Flash, Cisco quickly works out a way to get Barry out of the Speed Force without blowing up the city. However, he appears in Keystone not Central City and when he returns… a wave of dark matter hits a city bus full of people, creating new metahumans.

Wally leaves to find himself, and Barry returns to Iris, being the Flash, and working with Cisco (Vibe) and Caitlin (Killer Frost). At the beginning of the season, they are dealing with a sudden increase in new metahumans, who like always can be criminals, or heroes, or something in between. But before long, Barry realizes there is a new villain at work – someone who isn’t a Speedster. The Thinker is a Chessmaster – someone who plans everything and has been plotting events for three years. The Thinker gained powers during the particle accelerator accident but also was “cursed’ with an advanced and deadly form of ALS. Yet, as we discover – his planning predates the particle accelerator accident as does his sociopathic nature and utter hatred of humanity.

Clifford Devoe was a history professor at Oxford when he met and married a scientist Marlize, and the two relocated to Central City to take tenured positions. However, Devoe was angered by his students paying more attention to their phones that him and his lectures. He also insulted Marlize and her work when they met – and revealed his negative view of humanity. As the season progresses, Marlize changes from being completely complacent and even an aide to her husband’s work, to a manipulative and cold woman, to a victim – as she realizes her husband’s plans would hurt her too, and he doesn’t care. By the end of the season, it’s clear that Marlize is key to taking down The Thinker.

Wally leaves after Barry returns. Cecile discovers she’s pregnant and tells Joe West about this. She also gains temporary telepathic abilities during her pregnancy. One of the bus metas is Ralph Dibny, a private investigator who lost his position with the CCPD after Barry as a new CSI accused him of evidence tampering. After a certain amount of questioning from Barry and doubt from Ralph, he joins Team Flash as the Elongated Man – and adds a considerable amount of lightness to the team. Ralph is one of those characters who acts tough and even self-centered, but he has a good heart and cares considerably about stopping the bad guy. I liked Ralph and I hope he’s still on the show next season.

Many of the other bus metahumans are good people who have no idea what to do with their new abilities. Unfortunately, The Thinker’s plan includes killing each of the new metas in turn and absorbing their powers, as well as using their bodies. This leads Marlize to realize her husband isn’t a good person, though it takes her a while – and her discovery that he’s drugging her and manipulating her mind and memory before she starts to realize anything.

This set includes part 3 of the “Crisis on Earth X” crossover – which was pretty good but it’s without context since parts 1 and 4 are missing (they are on the Supergirl and Legends of Tomorrow DVD sets presumably, which won’t be available until later in September). The first episode after the crossover has a “Did I miss something?” feel to it. And apparently, Iris and Barry are now married, finally. As I said in my review of Arrow Season 6, I really wish that Warner Brothers and the CW would do what the BBC does with the Doctor Who Christmas specials and put them out on DVD/Blu-ray immediately after the entire special airs. I would pay for a disc that includes the entire special – and still buy the season sets with that episode included in context on each series’ season set. It would be nice to have a movie version of the crossover special.

Despite all their setbacks, in the end, Team Flash, including Cecile, work together with secret weapon, Marlize, and defeat The Thinker, reversing his diabolical plan, as expected. However, this was a good season. Ralph Dibny, the Elongated Man, one of DC’s lesser-known heroes, provides a sense of humor and fun – and also someone for Barry to train as a new hero. The Thinker isn’t a speedster, which was a different approach to a season-long villain, though I must admit I liked the “new meta of the week” episodes almost better than the ones focusing on figuring out what the Thinker’s plans were and how to stop him. The Thinker is a chessmaster, a planner, someone who can easily pull Barry’s strings. He’s also a diabolical psychopath – something held in reserve until his evil plan is finally revealed. Parts of this worked, whereas other parts really seemed like our characters being dumb for plot purposes (especially when Barry is set-up, accused of murder, found guilty, and sentenced to life in prison in the same cell as his father had occupied).

Overall, I enjoyed the season and I’m looking forward to watching season 5.

Read my review of The Flash Season 1.

Read my review of The Flash Season 2.

Read my review of The Flash Season 3.

The Flash Season 3 Review

  • Series: The Flash
  • Season: 3
  • Episodes: 23
  • Discs: 6
  • Cast: Grant Gustin, Candice Patton, Danielle Panabaker, Carlos Valdes, Tom Cavanagh, Jesse L. Martin, Keiynan Lonsdale, Tom Felton
  • Network:  CW (Warner Brothers Productions)
  • DVD Format: Color, Widescreen

The third season of The Flash begins with Flashpoint, after his father is killed, Barry Allen travels back in time and saves his mother. He has three wonderful months with both his parents being alive, but eventually things don’t go so well, and Barry decides he’s made a mistake, so he has to reverse it. He releases the Reverse Flash whom he’s kept hostage and allows the death of his mother to happen. But when he returns to the new present things are different. Iris isn’t talking to her father, Joe. Cisco is extremely angry at Barry and grieving. Caitlin, unknown to the others at first, is developing cold powers and fears becoming Killer Frost. And at the Central City Police Department, Barry is now working under a new head of the CSI department, Julian Albert, a man that doesn’t like or get along with him.

At first, Barry is at a loss. But within an episode or two, Barry gets the team back together, and although things are not perfect, they are at least working together. It takes Cisco a little longer to come around (he lost his brother, Dante, as a result of Flashpoint), but he works with Team Flash anyway. Flashpoint has another effect – new metas are appearing in Central City, and the police forensic department is finding husks that are somehow linked to these new metas and a villain called “Alchemy”. Barry suddenly realizes that the new metas had existed in Flashpoint.

There’s more investigation, and it becomes apparent that Julian is Alchemy but he’s merely a harbinger and servant to Savitar – the God of Speed. Julian had become obsessed with an artifact known as The Philosopher’s Stone, but when he found it on a dig in India, his entire archaeological team died, and unknown to Julian, he became Alchemy. Julian is brought in to Team Flash and the fight against Savitar. Meanwhile, Caitlin’s cold powers become more obvious. At first, she takes a pair of meta-power damping bracelets to suppress her powers. Later, Cisco makes her a necklace. Wally also becomes Kid Flash – as he was in Flashpoint.

But once the Alchemy plot is resolved, and the fallout from Flashpoint largely settled, the main focus of the season becomes clear: Savitar. In an attempt to destroy The Philosopher’s Stone, Barry is thrust into the future and he sees Savitar murder Iris. Saving Iris becomes the focus of the rest of the season. Team Flash tries to change the future, by changing the other headlines Barry saw on a TV news broadcast when he traveled to the future. There are villains of the week to defeat, but the majority of the plot is devoted to preventing Iris’s death, and figuring out who or what Savitar is and how to stop him. Barry even travels to the future again, and discovers just how messed-up everyone is without Iris – and how broken, he, Barry, is. By the end of the season, it becomes clear who Savitar is: he’s a time remnant of Barry Allen – and essentially a time paradox.

The last two episodes of the season play like one big 2-hour finale, even though there is no “to be continued” title card at the penultimate episode. In the second-to-last episode, we see the events from a few months before – and Savitar kills Iris despite Team Flash finding a physicist, Tracy Brand to build a speed cannon to defeat him. But, it turns out to not be Iris but rather HR Wells, using a projector to hide his appearance and take Iris’s place. Tracy, who was starting to fall in love with HR was devastated. But now that Iris is alive, it changes things – and essentially Team Flash is waiting for the Time Paradox to catch up and for Savitar to disappear from reality. Savitar tries to save himself at the last minute – but Barry shows him mercy and even invites this other scarred Barry on to Team Flash.

This doesn’t go well, and Savitar kidnaps Cisco. But Cisco gets through to “Killer” Frost. At first, it looks like Caitlin will still choose Savitar, but in the end she doesn’t. Julian develops a cure for her, but she also chooses to return it to him, deciding to keep her frosty personality, but maybe without the “Killer” part. Barry has a final fight with Savitar, defeats him, turns away and is nearly killed – until Iris saves Barry by killing Future Evil (Savitar) Barry.

You’d think all would be well, but as Barry and Iris start to discuss wedding plans – a speed force storm erupts and threatens the entire city. Barry voluntarily goes into the Speed Force to fill the prison that Savitar left empty.

Season three of The Flash had it’s ups and downs. Although having Yet Another Evil Speedster seems like a bad idea – I had less of a problem with that than the main plot point being the threat to Iris’s life. The majority of the season seems to rest on the idea that no matter what Team Flash does – they can’t change things enough to save Iris – and the future is fixed. But, we know, Iris is a main character – and she’s not likely to really “die”. Throughout the history of DC Comics – Iris West is Barry Allen’s wife, not his girlfriend – and whether she is “Iris Allen” or “Iris West-Allen” she is his wife. So, despite this “big threat” that she will die – it’s an empty one, we know that she won’t. It is possible to make something interesting to see how she will survive, and HR’s sacrifice to save her is actually a surprise – but that she survives isn’t really a surprise.

That Savitar turns out to be Barry almost doesn’t work – it explains how Savitar knows everything Team Flash will do – he simply remembers what happened. But it’s actually “Killer” Frost who gives the game away – when she says everything Barry will say, as he says it, she’s actually giving Barry a big hint as to who Savitar is. Plus the Savitar-is-Barry plot actually mirrors the Wells/Thawne/Reverse Flash plot from season 1 – but this time in a sense we see the time travel paradox from Barry’s point-of-view, and Savitar is Barry as Reverse Flash, which in some ways works but in a lot of ways does not fit Barry’s character. Barry, despite his dark past, is one of the happiest characters in DC Comics. And, although it makes sense that in a fit of despair, after the loss of his father, he would go back in time and create Flashpoint, it doesn’t follow that he would then become Savitar, especially as Savitar originally exists in the Flashpoint Universe – which is the one where Barry’s parents are both alive and Barry doesn’t have super speed.

However, despite that, and season 3 of The Flash being darker than previous seasons, I still enjoyed it. Watching the development of Iris and Barry’s relationship is joyful. Wally West, especially once he becomes Kid Flash is awesome. I like Julian and HR as members of Team Flash. Caitlin’s story was well told – and I liked, a lot, that she was given agency throughout her story. She was able to choose if she’d be “Killer” Frost (though it’s Julian who causes the manifestation of her powers), and, more importantly, it’s Caitlin who decides not to take the experimental “cure” to remove her powers. It would have been so easy for someone to simply shoot the cure into her – but The Flash didn’t go that route. I also really liked Tracy Brand as a character, and I hope we see more of her in Season 4, but I doubt we will.

Follow this link to read My Review of Season 1 of The Flash.

Follow this link to read My Review of Season 2 of The Flash.

Book Review- The Flash Book 1 (by Mark Waid)

  • Title: The Flash Book 1
  • Author: Mark Waid
  • Artist: Greg LaRocque
  • Line: early Modern Age
  • Characters: Wally West (The Flash)
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 05/23/2017

It is just fun to go back in time, so to speak, and read a collection from the 1990s, even with the occasional cringe-worthy moment (oh, Golden Glider… let’s just say the CW version is much better). The Flash Book One by Mark Waid, is a collection of a number of Flash stories, focusing on the early modern age Flash, Wally West. This was my Flash, simply because I started reading DC Comics in the mid-1980s, after Crisis on Infinite Earths and to me, Barry Allen’s sacrificial death was a fait accompli and Wally was the Flash and a full-fledged member of the Justice League (aka Justice League International, later Justice League America).

The first story has a far future Flash traveling back in time to gather past Flashes (Jay Garrick the Golden Age Flash, Barry Allen, the Silver Age Flash, and Wally West) to help against a world-ending disaster in the far future. However, this Flash, John Fox, fails to even meet the various other Flashes and even manages to really mess-up the life of a mobster’s girl by preventing her from talking to the Flash.

The rest of the book is various adventures of the Flash, Wally West. From seeing Wally get his powers in a million-to-one exact repeat of the accident that made Barry Allen the Flash to Wally becoming more comfortable in his own skin as the Flash, this is a fun and light introduction to the character. Note that in the story where Wally becomes Kid Flash – he doesn’t know Barry is the Flash, even though Barry is his uncle (or uncle to-be – at this point Iris and Barry are engaged). It is clear, later, that Wally knows the truth about Barry and is a little resentful of the former Flash’s deception. (Though Barry was merely trying to protect Wally and Iris.)

The book includes adventures between the Flash and various members of his Rogues Gallery, including a final story featuring The Trickster, who is always fun.

Overall, this is a fun and light book. Wally West is a happy-go-lightly character who, although is adventures are exciting, they are above all fun. This is not a grim, serious, gritty book – it’s the exact opposite of that. Most of these stories even carry the “Comics Code Approved” seal. Still, “light and fun” have always been associated with the Flash, and this book is that. It’s the perfect light reading.