Non-Fiction Textbook Review – How to Get Started as a Technical Writer

  • Title: How to Get Started as a Technical Writer
  • Author: James Gill
  • Subject: Technical Writing
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 04/24/2013

In a sense this book does exactly what it says on the tin, especially if you include the subtitle questions. But that’s why I loved it. As a person in their early 40s looking at a career change, this book answered all the questions I had, and then some. It also confirmed that I had finally made the right choice in finding a career I’d love. Technical writing seems like the perfect career for a perpetual student with a love of writing.

This book is brief (only 70 pages), clear-cut, and full of no-nonsense advice and information. It’s a practical guide, and although the author occasionally uses personal examples, it does not read like a tell-all book or expose’, rather it’s a plain, common-sense guide to the realities of working in the technical writing field. The author is calm, not condescending, helpful, not hurtful, and has no political agenda other than to answer questions from potential technical writers and offer practical help and advice. It makes for a nice change from several of the “career manuals” out there which seem to think anyone investigating a new career is a potential rival who must be shot down – cruelly.

Most of the chapter titles are questions, and the chapter accurately answers those questions. Additionally, each chapter offers “Do This” assignments, which far from being pointless homework, are practical suggestions for investigating the tech writing field, and also in some cases examples of things to do that can be applied to any new career, whether you are a 24-year old new college graduate, or a 40-something looking to try something new. I really wish I had read this book my senior year in college.

Chapters include:
• Who is this book for?
• How to use this book
• My story
• Why become a Technical Writer?
• What is Technical Writing?
• Life as a technical writer
• Five Must-Have Skills
• Should I get more education or training?
• How do I get experience?
• How do I get hired?
• Putting it all together
• Resources
• Glossary

Again, this is a practical no-nonsense career guide. It’s a helpful tool for the new technical writer. Unlike other writing guides and career books I’ve looked at or read, it’s completely free of condescending talk — and avoids re-hashing advice you find everywhere from Monster to The Ladders. And yes, it’s well written.

My highest recommendation. Oh, and by the way, if you are a perpetual student who loves writing – technical writing might be the career for you!

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Non-Fiction Textbook Review – Spring into Technical Writing for Scientists and Engineers

  • Title: Spring into Technical Writing for Scientists and Engineers
  • Author: Barry J. Rosenberg
  • Subject: Technical Writing
  • Date Reviewed on GoodReads: 08/22/2012

Update: – Read this for a technical writing class, back in 2012, per the date on GoodReads.

Spring into Technical Writing is a textbook, however, it is useful and even amusing at times. Some of the examples are a bit overwhelming but I like a challenge, and they weren’t so dense as to be completely off-putting or to cause me to put the book down.

This was a very readable textbook. It kept my interest and was a quick read. It also seemed to be full of good advice. I really liked the “bad”, “better”, “good”, “best” examples throughout the book and it could have used even more. I did at times find that the book was a bit simplistic (I do know, believe it or not, the difference between a serif and sans-serif font) and throughout the book often the starting point for a section or chapter was too easy. On the other hand, the chapter on HTML was very difficult for me. Yes, I realize this wasn’t a manual on learning HTML, but that seemed to be the only section in the book that assumed some pre-knowledge that I didn’t have. (The web is like a car, I can use it but I don’t know or care how it works. I know more about how a server and a network “serve” web pages, and the meaning of terms like “caching web browser” than I do about HTML – and I’ve learned more HTML from the Goodreads website than any web design book I’ve read or class I started then quit). But I digress. Other than the HTML section, which I intend to re-read, I found this textbook to be light-hearted, useful, and fun to read. The humor and examples helped.

Second Update: Since reading this book, I’ve learned more HTML by using WordPress, and from my four-month stint as a knowledge base writer/editor. So I should probably re-read the HTML section and see if it’s less confusing.

The Ghost Writes Back – from Tumblr

tetw:

by Amy Boesky

For six years during my twenties, I worked as one of the principal ghostwriters for a mass-market series for teenaged girls called Sweet Valley High. Years later, I’m still trying to make sense of what these books meant to me—why I wrote so many of them, and why (eventually) I stopped…

I remember reading those books.  Great essay on writing, and ghostwriting.

The Ghost Writes Back

Ask An Author: “How do you create realistic-feeling characters?”

lettersandlight:

image

Each week, a new author will serve as your Camp Counselor, answering your writing questions. Marivi Soliven, our second counselor, has taught writing workshops at the University of California, San Diego and at the University of the Philippines. Her most recent novel, The Mango Bride,…

Sounds like good advice!

Ask An Author: “How do you create realistic-feeling characters?”